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[ Active Members: 2 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 119 ]  [ Total: 121 ]  [ Newest Member: Bigbandito ]
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Author Previous Topic: Ballast Topic Next Topic: looking for switch machine
Page: of 12

Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 07/30/2008 :  06:54:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What kind of colour should I paint the sides of my rails?

I'm modelling HO industrial switching in the 1930's on the New York waterfront. I have sprayed the track a slightly reddish shade of roof brown and intend to use Woodland Scenics fine cinders ballast with a little bit of dark brown mixed in to give it some variation.

Should the sides of the rails be a dark grey that might represent fairly well used rails, or a dark rusty brown for old rust, or bright rust for fresh rust (given it is on the seafront with all that salty air), or a pale brown of blown dust and sand used for traction?

Neil



Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia

Country: Australia | Posts: 2485 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/30/2008 :  08:13:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Neil,
I would thing all of the above would work.
For any rail that is closest to the water maybe a lighter color rust as that would be the track that was most affected by the salt sea air and then going to a darker color as you move away form the wharf.

Here is a picture of a metal rail barge where you can see the color of the barge and the track.
This would be the extreme since this barge actually traveled at sea from Seattle Washington to Whittier Alaska.





John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13306 Go to Top of Page

Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 07/30/2008 :  09:19:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the quick reply John. I think you are right. The less used spurs and the pier can be rustier than the through tracks and variation wouldn't be a bad thing. Your example is a bit rustier than I would have tried so there is a prototype for everything!


Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia

Country: Australia | Posts: 2485 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/30/2008 :  1:41:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Steam engines make ash (gray) and soot/cinders (black). Brake shoe dust is rust-colored, sand is beige. Flange oiler grease and journal drippings are black. I don't know how it would work out in an oceanfront setting, but blackish gray dominated the picture in inland China, except on grades where a lot of sand was used.


Country: USA | Posts: 5860 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 09/09/2008 :  08:22:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I didn't think I should start a new thread just for one question on trackwork. If this post dont belong here, please feel free to move it.

My layout will be constructed in modules. It will be mostly logging late 1800's early 1900's.
One mainline loop, and the rest branchline construction. I need help on deciding what size turnouts to build, #4, #5 or #6? (only one size for all) Fast tracks will be the way to go.
All code 70. Thanks in advance...



Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 09/23/2008 :  09:09:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another question: I would like to replace the plastic ties on my ME code70 flextrack with wooden ties and spike them as shown in a different how-to on this subject. Are there "ready made" ties fo the correct thickness available and can someone steer me in the direction as to where to buy them.
Thanks in advance.....



Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

dave1905
Fireman



Posted - 09/23/2008 :  09:19:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit dave1905's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kappler Lumber, Micro Engineering both sell ties. Fast Tracks and Proto87 sells those and other ties. Micro Engineering and Proto87 make spikes.

For a logging branch #4, #5 or #6 would be good, depends on how much room you have. #5 is a good compromise, #6 allows any steamer to operate, but takes more room.

Dave H.


Dave Husman

Iron Men and wooden cars
Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

Country: USA | Posts: 1143 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 09/23/2008 :  10:03:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for al the info Dave! "Room" will not be a problem as I will have a layout room of about 16 x 28 feet. Maybe larger....depends where the stairs are located in the new house being built.
Since I have a couple articulated tankers, I will probably go with #6...Thanks again.



Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

emccamey
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/23/2008 :  11:45:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit emccamey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Using number 6 as your minimum is great, but for crossovers and certain yard configurations where you crate a "S" curve, you should consider a number 7 or 8 for much improved operational reliablity. You will have the space, and the difference is worth the extra length.

-ed-



Country: USA | Posts: 964 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 09/23/2008 :  12:13:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ed! I will keep that in mind....specially for the fiddle yards & stuff.
I know you are supposed to keep at least a carlength (longest car or loco) between bends on a "S" curve and crossovers.....



Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/23/2008 :  1:45:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Geezer,

Send a message to Terry at Fast Tracks with these questions. He is a great help. They carry the ties, rail, spikes and of course the turnout templates.

Best of luck with your planning ....


Tom M.

Country: | Posts: 9572 Go to Top of Page

ron_brann
New Hire

Posted - 12/10/2008 :  7:31:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mason,
Is the product you work with the same as that from California Roadbed? I have been trying to get some info from the company, but it seems to be a one-man operation with nobody on the phones.

Do you prefer their curveable or straight product? How does the 60-degree bevel look?

Thanks for your help.

Ron

quote:
Originally posted by smason2

Hi Folks,

I'm in the subroadbed, roadbed, track stages of a layout that will fill a 1,400 square foot basement. I did some research into sub and roadbed materials, and based my decisions on the following criteria: stability and longevity of the material, ability to withstand the constant changes in temperature and humidity in a New England basement, cost, ease of installation and availability.

As a result, I have chiseled my benchwork, subroadbed and roadbed out of concrete...just kidding!

When all was said and done, the traditional materials won out...1/2" plywood for the subroadbed, and Homabed for the roadbed. The latter is a milled homasote product that comes in a variety of profiles and thicknesses. It is somewhat expensive, but cutting homasote is a major pain in the arse, so this was a good trade off.

I found that none of the materials that I looked at absorbed sound any better than the next, and unlike cork, homasote won't dry out and crumble, and will hold spikes.

Scott Mason



Nobody rises to low expectations

Country: | Posts: 1 Go to Top of Page

emccamey
Crew Chief



Posted - 12/10/2008 :  10:09:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit emccamey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ron,

The California Roadbed is the Homabed supplier. Yes, it's a one many shop.

I use and prefer the curveable kind almost exclusively. I seldom have any really straight track. Even my yards have a very large bow (cosmetic curve). The curving Homabed is just more flexible to work with. I use a Spackle to fill the slots.

The 60 degree is far better in appearance and more natural ballast shoulder. At issue is that for parallel tracks, it's extra width at the base (~ 2-1/8") means and different center line offset. The 60 degree slope is easier to trim on the inside mating points of the two track parallel pieces. Since I use a narrower center line than most (less than 2"), I found the 60 degree to be better to work with for the modifications.

-ed-



Country: USA | Posts: 964 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 10/08/2009 :  11:16:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pardon my ignorance, but this is something new to me.

I attempted my first piece of weathered/balasted track for the challenge build. I used a piece of Atlas flex track I had laying around. As you can see in the pic, the tops of the rails have not been cleaned yet.



The reason being is the track is goldish colored
(don't laugh too hard...OK?) Don't know the correct name for the material the rail is made of.

My question is this...how do you go about getting the tops of the rail silver?




OK...I'll wait till you pick yourself off the floor for an answer



In memory of Mike Chambers

Country: USA | Posts: 2972 Go to Top of Page

Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/09/2009 :  07:27:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Marken,
you mean brass, right?

Do you want the rail to be conductive when finished so you can run locomotives on it or are you just wanting it to look right for the diorama?

I think you could try rubbing on Neolube or a pencil to give it a graphite shine if you didn't want the track to be operational.

If it is going to be a little used siding then the head of the rail often got quite rusty anyway so give it a bit of a rub on the inside corners of the rail head, but not too much, and add some fresher orange rust.

If you want the track to work then I don't think there is much option but to clean the track with an abrasive track cleaner and live with the brass colour but maybe other people have ideas?



Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia

Country: Australia | Posts: 2485 Go to Top of Page
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