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MikeC
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Premium Member


Posted - 01/31/2003 :  6:23:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just floating an idea here.

After visiting Matt's site and seeing what he's done with his "Gotham Sub" layout, I started wondering about a thread devoted to finescale urban modeling.

Any interest?

Would such a thread attract others interested in finescale modeling and diorama construction?

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gidlmat
New Hire

Posted - 02/03/2003 :  7:59:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit gidlmat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sounds like a good thread to me! It would be a good place to meet others with Urban railroads or areas; there don't seem to be too many out there....


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wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/04/2003 :  08:52:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Mike and Matt,

I am interested in this thread, also.

Chuck



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MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/04/2003 :  10:07:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, guys, so what are topics you would like to discuss? (And notice I did not say see discussed!) Let's get the ball rolling...

Also, if you run across any fellow finescalers on other forums who would be interested in discussions about urban modeling, invite them here. The more folks we have responding and offering input, the more successful and interesting the discussion will be.

Here's something I would like to know more about: in constructing urban scenes, how do you go about placing structures on hills/inclines and modeling the sidewalks/streets so that it all looks natural?



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Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/04/2003 :  10:19:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all
If anyone has the Kalmbach book "6 HO Railroads you can build" there is a great project called "Building the Carbondale Central" by Malcolm Furlow. The article describes the building of a small urban scene. The article describes how by using foam risers and extra walls you can get elevation which is important in urban modeling. He also makes extensive use of bridges and retaining walls effectively to gain that city look. If I remember correctly Matt on his web site said he was influenced by the work of Malcom Furlow and you can see it in his work. Malcolm also does things backward as he tends to build scenery first and then make the track fit. A man after my own heart.
Actually if you can get this book there are many great ideas presented in the building of these 6 different layouts.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

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wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/04/2003 :  11:12:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike,

That is a good starting question. So far, I don't have any scenery...something I hope to rectify this year.

Anyway, I would like to build my urban scene on a slope. It would be a good transition for my benchwork as it gains elevation from one side of the penninsula to the other.

The part I always struggle with is how to deal with entry ways of structures onto a slope. What I thought about doing is building a flat base from foamboard. Then, build up smaller pieces of foam board that is the size of the footprint for each building. Then, use a piece of foam board at an angle to build a base for the road and sidewalk. Once the sidewalk is in place, I could build up steps to get to the entryways. Or, build steps downward if I make a structure have an entryway below the road level.

But, I am interested in some suggestions.

As for placement, I have a CAD program for designing the layout. As part of it, I built footprints of my structures keeping note of which buildings belong on a corner and which ones can go in the middle of the block. Then, like a puzzle, I keep rearranging them until they fit the scene. I also try to visualize how they will look together in a block, since most of these kits are not built, yet.

Chuck




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wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/04/2003 :  11:16:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I forgot to mention....

I really liked the cover of the March issue of MR. The concrete streets with all of the cracks and asphalt patches really caught my eye. Something to consider for my urban scene.

Chuck



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MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/04/2003 :  11:33:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

The part I always struggle with is how to deal with entry ways of structures onto a slope. What I thought about doing is building a flat base from foamboard. Then, build up smaller pieces of foam board that is the size of the footprint for each building. Then, use a piece of foam board at an angle to build a base for the road and sidewalk. Once the sidewalk is in place, I could build up steps to get to the entryways. Or, build steps downward if I make a structure have an entryway below the road level.
Chuck





Chuck, this is exactly what was behind my question. It seems to me that one would almost have to construct a foundation for each building (just like in the real world) to get the building level. Then a block of buildings would have to be stairstepped down the hill. But getting the angle of the sidewalks just right for the entry ways could be tricky. Of course you could use steps to gain entry...

I wonder if Matt or someone else has dealt with this problem.



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wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/04/2003 :  11:43:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Mike,

Nice to see I am not alone in grappling with this. Having an urban scene on a slope would create a lot of interest. I do hope Matt, or someone else, who has tackled this issue chimes in....maybe even provide pictures. I didn't see anything related to this in John Prycke's Urban Scenery book.

Chuck



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gidlmat
New Hire

Posted - 02/04/2003 :  4:30:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit gidlmat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Guys!

Well, this is a toughie. I have only done a couple of buildings that are set "in" scenery. The first is a building that is toward the back of the layout. It has only two detailed walls and the other two are cut from cardstock. There is a hill that comes down one side of the building (sorry I have no pictures) so that it is one story in the back and 3 in the front. I accomplished this by using the cardboard strip scenery method and making a web from the bottom to the top of the hill (which abuts a street). Once I had the web made, I glued a bent piece of carstock (like an "l" beam) along the side of the building where the hill would go. Then I added plaster soaked towels and finished things off. There was a little clean up on the building from some stray plaster, but other than that it looked as if it was built into a hill.

My largest building, Sellios Mfg., is built on a hill on the backside only. I had bent a piece of 1/4" ply into an incline in the back (to go from a low part of the layout to a high part) and the back of this building was to set partially on this piece. The building was part plaster castings and part resin castings (Magnuson Models) and I simply cut the hill profile out of the bottom of the building so that it actually had an angled bottom. It wasn't very scientific, but it worked. Then I added scenery and some small plaster hills and - presto- it looked like it was built into the hill.

Here's a pic: http://www.gothamcitysub.com/pics/Dscn2815.jpg

I know that Gerge Sellios uses either wood or masonite for angled streets, sidewalks and hills with buildings. The buildings are then built to the contour of the hill. That takes a little planning, but it works. Good luck!! I like the foam idea by the way. I keep saying I'm goign to try foam for something....
Matt



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Drew
Fireman



Posted - 02/07/2003 :  1:21:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all!
Although I don't have any scenery that is on a "slope" so to speak, I can maybe show one way I delt with an unlevel section, where there was a large gap at the vase of a structure...
This also demonstrates why I like to save a lot of scraps...debris & "junk" being an important scenic material for an urban/industrial scene.

The structure backs up to the backdrop, & there was a large gap at the base...after toying with the idea of filling the gap with spacking, dirt, or some type of greenery, I opted to hide it with details, like the board fence, & pile of "junk" (little plastic odds & ends laying around on the workbench)

ok, now lets see if I can attach this picture...


Download Attachment: Mvc-021f.jpg
79.28 KB


-Drew-

"Life is all the stuff that happened while you were making other plans."

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Drew
Fireman



Posted - 02/07/2003 :  1:26:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hmmmm,
I think that worked...?
I'll try another one..this shows more use of workbench scraps as scenic detail...

Download Attachment: Mvc-022f.jpg
63.15 KB


-Drew-

"Life is all the stuff that happened while you were making other plans."

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cooldavion
Engine Wiper



Posted - 02/07/2003 :  2:06:28 PM  Show Profile  Send cooldavion an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Very Nice Pics Drew.


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Drew
Fireman



Posted - 02/07/2003 :  3:19:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks coolldavion!
Another suggestion I would make to anyone building urban scenery, is -
"Don't forget the trees!"
Vegetation always gets a foothold even in the most crowded of urban environs...
In the context of a model RR, this not only adds a degree of realism, but also adds depth, & breaks the scene up visually...

Download Attachment: Mvc-027f.jpg
61.9 KB


-Drew-

"Life is all the stuff that happened while you were making other plans."

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MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/07/2003 :  4:02:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great photos and suggestions, Drew. I don't think I've seen any of these before. Your scenes always amaze me because they are so realistic!

Casey



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MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/08/2003 :  11:32:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey, have you guys seen Bar Mills' "1 Kit" before? I don't know if it's new or not, but I had never seen this kit before. It looks really interesting.

It's a modular kit with laser-cut walls and windows, etc. that can be built up into any free lanced structure you can think of.

There are some really neat examples on the Bar Mills website. Go to the homepage and then click on "The 1 Kit."

http://www.barmillsmodels.com/




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