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 Old Rails as Trestle Stringers
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Author Previous Topic: Building the Estrella & Sonora Grande RR Topic Next Topic: Membership Renewal  

eTraxx
Fireman



Posted - 07/05/2012 :  12:04:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit eTraxx's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The following is from the Engineering and mining journal, Volume 96 published November 15, 1913.

Interesting .. eh? Would be easy to add just a 'bit' of this somewhere on the layout .. a bent or two poking from between some trees ...

quote:
In the reconstruction of the line of the Pennsylvania R.R. at Rahway, N. J., the Keystone State Construction Co. has a considerable length of timber trestle in which the stringers are made of old rails discarded by the railway. These trestles, states Engineering News, are of two types, one used as a construction railway and the other as a filling trestle which is covered by the fill as it progresses.
The construction railway trestle is the heavier of the two and is shown in the accompanying illustration. It is made up of the usual framed bents with round log uprights and sapling braces and a squared 68-in. cap.



On this cap run the stringers, four old 100-lb. rails, in groups of two, spanning the 12-ft. opening between bents. These rails are spiked with standard railway spikes to the cap and are spliced wherever the breaks come with the standard rail splices with bolts only in the end holes.

The 3-ft. gage construction track is built of old 70lb. rails spiked to 67-in. ties with an 89-in. tie dapped 2 in. over the stringer rails at the bents. These latter ties are bolted with 3/4-in. bolts to the bent caps, and this is the only fastening of the track to the bents or stringers.

In the filling trestle, the track rails also act as stringers. This track is of 3-ft. gage and is made up of old 100-lb. rails, spiked to 67-in. ties, which act merely as spacers between bents and as caps at the bents. The dirt train is backed onto the trestle and the cars are dumped at the edge of the fill so that no load but that of empty cars comes on the trestle. The ties and rails remain in the fill and form the construction track on the embankment.

Edited by - eTraxx on 12/29/2012 07:57:07 AM

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Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 07/06/2012 :  05:24:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is interesting. I am surprised to hear this method was used because 60kg/m rail we use on the mainline in Australia (roughly equivalent to 120lb/yard?) is pretty flexible and I would have thought that rail would actually make a worse material (in this situation) than wood.

I wonder what the weight limit on that type of structure was?


Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

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Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 07/06/2012 :  06:57:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ed & Neil - Great idea! On being flexible, if the rail was spiked
every other tie or even every tie, I don't think it would bend much under
the stress of a light weight loco or tram. I worked 1:1 at a rail mill
(US) that produced 90# rail in 2- foot lengths - never seen one bend, only
cobble when it came out of the dies/rollers and hit a snag. I think, jmo,
this is a very neat idea and would make a fine bit of detail, like Ed said.



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Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 07/06/2012 :  08:23:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is a nice detail and something a bit different but I think it would be too weak to work for anything more than narrow gauge lightweight railways. I doubt a K27 or something like that would make it across!

Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

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eTraxx
Fireman



Posted - 07/06/2012 :  09:01:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit eTraxx's Homepage  Reply with Quote
No doubt you would only run light engines on it. Note that in the text, the one illustrated was a construction railway. I take that to mean that they used it to deliver materials to the work-site. I think that could easily be used on a layout .. the construction rail runs from behind something to say .. a place it dumps sand or gravel ..

Edit: With a cuppa coffee in hand this morning I managed to see that the illustration clearly states the locomotive weighs 24 tons



Edited by - eTraxx on 07/07/2012 06:02:42 AM

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Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 07/06/2012 :  12:20:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
yeah.....like tailings off the end of a hopper line....
neat idea.....



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eTraxx
Fireman



Posted - 07/06/2012 :  12:52:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit eTraxx's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have need for a small trestle to carry my On18 across a gap .. this would be perfect I think




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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/06/2012 :  4:09:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've seen photos of post-WWII mainlines using rails as stringers in the southwest. I expect the decision to do so would have a lot to do with a) whether there was worn-beyond-usable rail handy, b) how far it was to the nearest steel mill, and c) how far it was to the nearest source of good timber stringers.


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okiecrip
Engine Wiper



Posted - 07/06/2012 :  9:00:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thats what they use on that little railroad at that brick plant in sc that was on the tour at the convention


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MinerFortyNiner
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/07/2012 :  12:15:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit MinerFortyNiner's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Do it, Ed...it is your destiny!


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okiecrip
Engine Wiper



Posted - 07/07/2012 :  7:20:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
may the force be with you


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eTraxx
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2012 :  08:20:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit eTraxx's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm at the point of probably using this technique to bridge the gap on my On18 line. I noticed that the graphic had been eaten by the internet so I updated it .. which 'bumped' this thread.

Whatheheck. Doesn't hurt. :)



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