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 Saulena's Tavern by Bar Mills
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CBryars2
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 06/19/2012 :  4:04:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit CBryars2's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi,

Moved this from Construction, posted wrong - sorry!

Building Saulena's Tavern by Bar Mills. Trying to add interior detail and wanted to post to get some good ideas from everyone. Most postings in Construction area under DGCCRR, it was suggested I post here to get more building construction feedback.

Here is progress to date:


Beginning constructing walls. Painted Primer Grey as base then black.


Here is first look at interior work. Used floor picture from dollhouse site and attached with spray adhesive.


Added bar stained with Brown shoe dye and alcohol. Also a work area.


Added pictures from Web. Red line is so no-one would be offended (not on model).


Here is view with outer wall temporarily added.

Next steps include furniture, figures, bottles, and lighting.

Any hints, ways to improve, etc. appreciated.

Thanks Cameron

Country: USA | Posts: 775

LaRueD
Crew Chief



Posted - 06/19/2012 :  9:50:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
... interesting start ...
this looks to be 1/87 scale?

Delbert
Sulphur Springs Valley, Arizona




Edited by - LaRueD on 06/21/2012 5:25:14 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 535 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 06/20/2012 :  01:57:40 AM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Looking good Cameron.

Might I suggest some architraves around the window, and maybe the door? Just some scale 6 by 1 or 6 by 2 would do the trick.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1196 Go to Top of Page

CBryars2
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2012 :  1:57:56 PM  Show Profile  Visit CBryars2's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys,

Ok forgive my ignorance but what is a architrave?

I've added the windows and trim. Have to work on interior before I can proceed much further.

Thanks Cameron



Country: USA | Posts: 775 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 06/20/2012 :  3:02:26 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi Cameron.

Definition from online.

Architrave - a molded or decorated band framing a panel or an opening, especially a rectangular one, as of a door or window.

Every older style house will have them. Now most new doors and windows come with a plasterboard rebate machined into the jambs/ frames and so they are no longer necessary.

Search under 'images' if you are still confused.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1196 Go to Top of Page

CBryars2
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2012 :  9:39:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit CBryars2's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Mark,

Have applied what is in the kit will post picture in the next day or so.

Cameron



Country: USA | Posts: 775 Go to Top of Page

Sean_OBrien
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/20/2012 :  11:15:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by CBryars2

Ok forgive my ignorance but what is a architrave?


Architrave is a $5 word which the Brits still use in order to make the colonies feel inferior. We just call it molding over here.

When you get to your furniture - see if you can position it in a way to conceal the seams on the flooring. Not sure how visible that will be in the final arrangement, but right now it is a bit jarring to my eye.



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CBryars2
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 06/21/2012 :  11:51:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit CBryars2's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The seams are an issue. Alot of work still to go. May use Wainscot to cover bottom part of wall the hide seam. Otherwise maybe some really tiny trim wood to act like quarter-round used in real buildings.

Furniture and lighting are next target. Maybe a few tables, bar stools, and figure out something for bottles, maybe pictures.

Lighting trying to determine if 1-2 micro-electronics 1.5 v bulbs or 0603 LED's in some round light fixtures will work. Also thinking piano with player and wire speaker in kitchen area playing tunes.

One area I also need advice on is decals for windows and signs. Want to name the building BarKeep's Tavern.

This building will be about 12" from front edge so not sure how much will really show inside.

Thanks for pointing out the details, it really helps.

Cameron



Country: USA | Posts: 775 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 06/21/2012 :  4:17:11 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:


Architrave is a $5 word which the Brits still use in order to make the colonies feel inferior. We just call it molding over here.



Actually, I believe it is French, from Old French, from Old Italian : archi-, archi- + trave, beam (from Latin trabs, trab-; see treb- in Indo-European roots). I don't think we use it in England. It stemmed from classical times. The first known use is in 1563.
It is also the lowest division of an entablature resting in classical architecture immediately on the capital of the column.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 06/21/2012 4:18:17 PM

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mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 06/21/2012 :  4:21:33 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi Cameron.

If you're talking about the 'seems' between the walls and the floor then modern skirting is generally about 2 1/2" tall by 1/2" thick - not quarter round (at least here in NZ). Back in the day skirting was generally 8" tall by 1" thick - sometimes even taller, so a multitude of sins could be hidden (not that I see a multitude of sins!) You could perhaps run a bead of 8 by 1" around the walls if you wanted. If you did you would really need architraves around the door as well. Older style buildings also often had a picture rail - some 2 by 1" timber running around the room I think normally just above door height. The room was often painted one colour below the picture rail, and another colour above. Also pictures were hung from it (hence the name). It could be a nice little detail to add in.

By the way Architrave is pretty standard language in the building industry in New Zealand and I think Australia as well as the UK. Molding doesen't distinguish between skirting, architrave, scotia etc. I think plasters and painters might use the word 'molding' more than builders do. Of course we do use the Queens English here - hence the different spelling of words such as colour and humour, and perhaps the more common use of words such as architrave.

Cheers, Mark.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1196 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 06/21/2012 :  4:23:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Cameron,
I would give a search in google images for some ideas on what to add to the interior. I don't know the era you are modeling, but I searched '1930 bar interiors photos' for lots of pictures. Be sure to click images on the left side.
Good job so far.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Sean_OBrien
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/21/2012 :  5:31:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yah - the various moldings could make or break something like this. Though, as mentioned...it does depend to a great extent on what period you are modeling as well as when the building was built (and if the original use was for a tavern or something else).

The skirting (we normally call that baseboard) will generally be taller in older buildings - though if it was built originally as a tavern - using a baseboard in conjunction with some form of wainscoting or paneling and a chair rail might be better suited. That was fairly common in establishments that would see frequent risk to the plaster finish (restaurants and pubs) where patrons might bump their chairs against the wall (or peoples heads...if it is that sort of place). The picture rail would be appropriate as well in many older establishments - again, especially if it was originally built as a restaurant or tavern. As mentioned, the picture frames would have a cleat on the back that would hang from it. Also somewhat common in many areas was a plate rail - though that was generally somewhat lower.

The actual style of the trim can help to date the building as well. Much like clothing - trim changes faster than other things do. Bit more history, and I could offer some advice there (put myself through college as a trim carpenter).

BTW - we distinguish between general molding and architrave by calling the architrave casing normally. I remember it was always great fun to walk into the B&Q when I was stationed in England and try to navigate the linguistic divide.



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LaRueD
Crew Chief



Posted - 06/21/2012 :  5:42:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cameron, ...

In case you weren't aware, there is RR-L topic/thread (of 23 pages) devoted to interior decoration:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7418

Perhaps there may be something there to inspire your build.

Looking forward to your progress.

Delbert



"Lead, follow, or get out of the way.

Country: USA | Posts: 535 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 06/21/2012 :  6:37:37 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
"some form of wainscoting or paneling and a chair rail" - it seems you guys in the USA use just as many weird words as the English!

I agree Sean that some form of panelling around the walls (with some baseboard and a chair rail) could look very nice - and be very appropriate. Whether one can buycolonial baseboard (skirting) and architraves I don't know - but if you could it would look fantastic. Although from a foot away perhaps the details would not be picked up and some 8 by 1" baseboard, 2 by 1" chair rail and 6 by 1" verticle panelling behind would look ok.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1196 Go to Top of Page

CBryars2
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 06/21/2012 :  6:48:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit CBryars2's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Great help guys just the stuff I need.

The scale is HO. Using on a HOn3 Proto-freelance of the Colorado & Southern in 1916-18.

Will look that the link provided for furniture and interior ideas.

I am also working on this while I begin a scratch-build of a C&S section house. I friend from HOn3Chat who has his MMR is coaching me some on it. Want to work on the AP for buildings.

The comments are great, thinking the wainscot with a chair-rail on top and a 1x8 base on bottom on the visible parts would look great. Not sure what size lumber on the wainscot, maybe 1x6 vertical?

Thanks Cameron



Country: USA | Posts: 775 Go to Top of Page

Sean_OBrien
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/21/2012 :  7:33:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Being that it looks to be more of a "gentleman's establishment" than a regular bar might be - as opposed to a vertical paneling, something which we would actually call paneling* might be more appropriate. It was often seen as a throw back towards the Europeans and 'back East' in western regions for those who could afford such things.


*Not to be confused with what was called paneling in the 1970s and beyond. Old style paneling looks more like a cabinet door front than it does something that escaped the Rumpus Room.



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