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Author Previous Topic: Cornerstone Union Station Topic Next Topic: Modelling with printed papers.
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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/01/2012 :  1:54:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This kit is by Mt. Blue Model Co. (www.mountbluemodelco.com). They make it in several scales, but mine is HO.



So far the laser cut parts have all fit nicely. I used boxcar red for the laser-engraved brick foundations and NH Hunter Green (Scalecoat) for the trim.



The doors are inset by design, so they'll need touch-up. But before I do that, I need to decide about the trim. Dark green was/is often used in New England for windows and doors on a white house. But painting the trim the same color as the windows is less common, and where I recall it is up-country, in western Maine and the White Mountains. But two nearby farmhouses (one scratchbuilt, one described here: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=24773) are plain white.

Thoughts?

Country: USA | Posts: 5378

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 04/01/2012 :  1:59:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nicely done, James, but be careful! These little beasties are addictive.

Ken has done a great job with this kit, the carriage house and all of the various permutations and combinations. The possibilities abound!

Enjoy!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5720 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/01/2012 :  2:06:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
White windows would have looked good to my eye. If you decide to do that, you should lightly sand the green paint off of the windows before spraying white, to prevent too much bleed-through.

I love the look of this kit. It looks exactly like a house in Bristol RI that we once considered buying. Same style, same era. Lots of these all over New England. But it should sit on a fieldstone foundation.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 04/01/2012 2:08:31 PM

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Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 04/01/2012 :  2:42:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
White windows would indeed look good on this. That said, I've seen all white, green with white, all green, black with white, all black, green windows on red houses and so on. As I mentioned earlier, the permutations and combinations abound!


Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5720 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 04/01/2012 :  2:51:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi James,I've never heard of this company before, so thanks for bringing them to my attention.Lots of great stuff,I love the "FIRE" pull boxes they make,cool detail.
I would be tempted to paint the sashes for the windows with white, and the have the green trim around them.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7492 Go to Top of Page

mecrr
Engine Wiper



Posted - 04/02/2012 :  11:18:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, I'm glad you are doing this build. I have a couple of these and have been holding off till I had time to figure how I was going to approach the roof (I have the kits with "steel roof" which presented me with a new modeling challenge. Look forward to all the comments and as always, learn.
David


A Maine Expatriate living in the valley of Northern California - Modeling in HO.
David Stickney

Country: USA | Posts: 444 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/02/2012 :  2:59:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, Thanks for bring this company to my mind too. They have some very nice products.
You don't want to scale down the green?
As far as all the houses being white. Isn't that prototypical for many old neighborhoods?
I will be following this build with great interest.



Edited by - railman28 on 04/02/2012 3:04:31 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 4420 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 04/02/2012 :  4:52:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, I like the green trim. It really sets off the house. But I have seen this identical prototype done in all white and all yellow also.


Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”~Benjamin Franklin
The 2nd Amendment, America’s 1st Homeland Security

Country: USA | Posts: 6590 Go to Top of Page

LVN
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/02/2012 :  5:00:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit LVN's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nice James. I really like the design of these models. How do you like the laser cut brick. Is it like Jimmy Simmons re quality?

Chris Lyon
http://www.lyonvalleynorthern.blogspot.com

Country: Canada | Posts: 5282 Go to Top of Page

bror hultgren
New Hire



Posted - 04/02/2012 :  7:47:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James,
I am on the side of doing the corner trim in white. Yes the window sash and doors were often painted in a contrasting colors. I don't recall pictures showing the color of the window and door trim. Also the corner trim seems very wide (what does it scale out to?) I am puzzled by the width (and use) of the trim board that is under the eave. I would have expected that corner boards would have been used on the corner above the one story addition,
I live in a ca 1850 half cape in Ipswich with a fieldstone foundation that is an open invitation to all of the neighborhood rodents,

Bror



Edited by - bror hultgren on 04/02/2012 9:42:27 PM

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bror hultgren
New Hire



Posted - 04/02/2012 :  9:42:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James,
I am on the side of doing the corner trim in white. Yes the window sash and doors were often painted in a contrasting colors. I don't recall pictures showing the color of the window and door trim. Also the corner trim seems very wide (what does it scale out to?) I am puzzled by the width (and use) of the trim board that is under the eave. I would have expected that corner boards would have been used on the corner above the one story addition,
I live in a ca 1650 half cape in Ipswich with a fieldstone foundation that is an open invitation to all of the neighborhood rodents,

Bror



Country: USA | Posts: 36 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/02/2012 :  9:53:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the comments, everyone.

Bror, the vertical parts of the main house trim measure .108", about 9 HO scale inches. The trim under the eave is .203" wide, but in normal viewing almost all of it will be hidden by the eaves. I'm thinking it would only be an issue when viewed as if by an LP less than 15 scale feet from the house. And maybe they're following a prototype - wood was cheap in 2-footer territory in the 19th century. The closest local example I've noticed is next door to White Farm on 1A right at the Rowley - Ipswich line, but I haven't passed by in good enough light to photograph it. The kit has gable trim for the ends and eave returns yet to apply - I was just trying to get a feel for how it would come out by stopping where I did.

Chris, I don't have experience with Mr. Simmons, but the engraving on the brick seems reasonable for use of mortar paste on it. I will post pictures when I get that far.

Bob, all white was indeed very common in the 1960s and before, but there will be a lot of white houses in Newburyport (next town east) too. I'll probably get my hint of variety by putting shutters on some of them.

Dave (mecrr), the window sill strip visible on the ell is the same size as the metal roof ribs, just shorter. It seems to be sticking ok, but the instructions recommend backing up the pressure-sensitive adhesive with ACC on some parts. I haven't tried that yet. Of course, if you found applying them to be a nuisance, you could use ribbed styrene instead of the kit's plywood/PSA strips.

Dave E., there were a number of brick works in Essex and Rockingham counties, and the house is right by the railway. I've seen foundations that were mixed, stone (random, but with most exposed surfaces cut flat) below and brick above ground level, and others where one section was all stone, the newer part all brick. Fully-cut stone blocks were for business buildings and rich folks' houses, uncut fieldstone tended to be used in barns. The resin Sylvan barn I'm planning to use here has a fieldstone foundation.



Country: USA | Posts: 5378 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/04/2012 :  11:02:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sorry about the lack of sunlight, but here goes:



I put the roof on temporarily, and decided I didn't like the green trim under the eaves of the main house.



But without that, though it does have a flavor of western Maine, I like the look. I'll just make it Gilbert Rice's farm (he was from Isleboro).

I also did a first application of Modeler's Mortar (paste) to the brick foundation. It doesn't have the wide mortar lines some plastic brick work has, but with a little weathering I think I'll be satisfied.



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mecrr
Engine Wiper



Posted - 04/05/2012 :  01:09:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mortar looks quite good, build making me homesick
David


A Maine Expatriate living in the valley of Northern California - Modeling in HO.
David Stickney

Country: USA | Posts: 444 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/08/2012 :  12:34:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I haven't made any progress on the kit itself, but I did get a couple of photos of a house in Rowley, MA which is a close cousin:



It's even still got clapboards on it.



Though looking at the quantity of pine needles in the gutter, its future might not be bright. The concrete steps on the side have a '50s flavor, and would be easy to do in styrene...




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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/01/2012 :  11:20:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I finally got back to the farmhouse tonight. The windows on the house and ell are all installed, but need glazing and window treatments. I've begun the bay. But I'm stalled on the front door. I used the "wide" frame, but the pictures and text in the instructions aren't clear about how the trim gets applied so it all works correctly with the portico roof brackets. And I can't find the May RMC to check the article. Oh, well, maybe it will look easier Sunday (Saturday is all booked up). And if I can make it work, I'll post a picture of the front door, as well lit as I can manage.


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