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 New 18'-0" boxcar Build
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Author Previous Topic: 1/48, 1/43, 1/50 - 25, 28, 32, 40 mm, figure ref. Topic Next Topic: Coast Line RR vol 7
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thayer
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/22/2014 :  04:12:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit thayer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here's a bit more progress as I chip away at my boxcars.

First, I realized after cutting a bunch of strip wood I probably should clean out under my Byrnes saw. Wow, what a surprise!

For reference, the blade adjustment knob measures 1 1/4 inches in diameter and the opening in the saw base is 6 1/2 wide. Quite a pile, and that doesn't count what settled on the workbench or in my lungs.

Here is some of the result.

Approximately 500 pieces of 1/32 x 1/8 for the decks and side/end sheathing, colored with various blends of alcohol, india ink and shoe dye.
And I am pretty sure I will need quite a bit more.

Detail of the rafters right after I finished notching them.

This took a little planning. After cutting rectangular blanks I cut the center notch and then used the Byrnes taper cutting jig to angle the ends. Then it was time to line them all up on a piece of scrap and notch for the secondary beams.

Finally, we have something that looks like it could be some rolling stock some day.

In addition to the lower frames which are all assembled, I now have two boxes framed and sheathed. One has the roof skeleton inserted, while the second set of roof bits awaits dry glue. The stringers are stained, though I also sanded them to near flush as they are slightly tall. The raw wood will be hidden once the roofing goes on.

The planned final finish will be dry brushed acrylic color over the staining and some final washes and weathering, so I am not too worried about the glue squeeze out. Also, the poplar is hard enough that I can pick and scrape off the excess reasonably well. Yeah, there is a lot of variation in the staining, but ... Given that these are backwoods, short line cars, I figure the boys in the shop framed them up whatever wood the local sawyer had available at the time.

My next step is to create a simple fixture that will allow me to glue up decking blanks and roof panels. I don't want to do those onto the frames a board at a time because the board spacing is so critical. Oh yeah, that and mill and stain yet more stock for the roof planking, roof walks, doors and anything else I may have forgotten.

I'm still having fun though, and that's what counts, right?



Edited by - thayer on 12/09/2014 03:15:50 AM

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BBLmber
Fireman



Posted - 11/22/2014 :  07:30:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You've done a great job so far, I'll be watching for thefinished cars.

Mark


W,L,&E

Country: USA | Posts: 6444 Go to Top of Page

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/22/2014 :  10:03:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thayer,

Very nice build. I like the mixture of stain colors for the sides.


Tom M.

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Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/22/2014 :  10:20:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thayer, that looks excellent.



Country: USA | Posts: 23957 Go to Top of Page

ironflyer
Fireman

Posted - 11/22/2014 :  10:38:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Beautiful work, following along!

That's fine, it'll make another trip kid.

Paul

Country: USA | Posts: 1312 Go to Top of Page

jschumaker
Fireman



Posted - 11/22/2014 :  10:56:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Impressive.

Jeff S.



Country: USA | Posts: 1659 Go to Top of Page

fwms
Section Hand

Posted - 11/22/2014 :  11:16:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thayer, I was wondering how I would cut out those rafters. I was thinking of stacking them and using a jig saw, but your miniature table saw is the answer. Now all I have to due is dig out/find mine... thanks.

Fred

"It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old - they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams" Gabriel Garcia Marques

Country: USA | Posts: 57 Go to Top of Page

thayer
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/22/2014 :  2:32:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit thayer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the kind words guys. No question, scribed siding is a lot faster, but one of the reasons I didn't go that route was specifically to allow some color and texture variation between the boards. One thing that doesn't show too well in these photos is that they are not all coplanar. There is some nice 3d variation between them.

I find that the Byrnes saw truly is indispensable and use it pretty much every day that I am in the workshop. It is the go-to tool any time I need straight cuts and lives on my main workbench right next to where I typically work. As useful as they are, my scroll saw and disk sander are about 6 feet away on a separate bench. Cutting the rafters was a little tedious, simply because they needed so many operations. Mill strips to dimension, batch cut to length, stack blanks and cut center notch, cut bevels on both ends, and finally cut secondary notches. I am using a .030 slitting saw blade for this fine cutting, so just to make things more interesting, each notch requires resetting the fence for a second pass. Keeping everything sequenced and within tolerance sure keeps my mind busy.

Speaking of paying attention, THE key concept with any table saw is keeping your fingers out of the blade and the temptation with a small tool is to think you won't hurt yourself. It may not have the power of my bigger saw, but it can still bind and kick back and spit stuff at your eyes and make your fingers leak. The rafter blanks are 0.030 x 0.2 x 1.5, so my fingers don't get near the wood when tapering these. I use a dental pick to hold the pieces against the table and sliding taper jig which advances them past the blade.

When cutting the notches I use scrap pieces of larger stock to maintain alignment, restrain the blanks and give my fingers more clearance. Adding 1/16 sq stock in the center notch once it is cut helps hold everything for the subsequent passes.

I had a couple minutes around lunch today to think about the roof walk supports. Sure, I could order up plastic bits, but my first thought was to try to make them myself. The trick of course is the concave tapers on the under side, and getting the table saw out of my mind. I couldn't come up with an easy way to shape them with the saw and finally realized that maybe the mill was the way to go. I used D2NC to quickly draw the part, create the necessary offset and nested array, and then ran a quick test using a scrap of 3/8 x 3/4 paulownia that I have in excess. Sure enough, it worked out very well, as you can see below. I won't use these parts as paulownia is a bit soft and fuzzy compared to the poplar that I have used everywhere else. No big deal though, as the cut time for 6 cars worth of parts was less than 3 minutes. Now that I know it works I will make another run from the poplar.

Closeup of the 1/16 end mill doing its job. The paulownia fuzz is readily apparent in this view.


I cut the parts more than full depth on thicker piece of stock and then set my table saw fence to part them off.


Here is the first pile of test parts.


Note that I set the blade depth to only cut half the stack so that I can more safely brace the stock against the fence with my fingers without worrying about the blade so much.

Oh, and about that concern of the curved cutter working on an inside corner? If my math is right, the error is less than 0.0002 in real inches, or .008 scale inches.



Edited by - thayer on 12/09/2014 03:16:23 AM

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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/23/2014 :  10:06:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thayer,

Great thread. I love seeing somebody else using table top CNC to scratchbuild rolling stock.

Following along this one very closely. Excellent work.

Bernd


WWG1WGA

Country: USA | Posts: 3654 Go to Top of Page

Jim Ellis
Section Hand

Posted - 11/23/2014 :  11:55:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thayer,

Do you buy your board material for the decks and side/end sheathing already cut to the proper thickness (1/32") or do you cut it to the proper thickness yourself? If you cut it yourself, I'd sure like to know (see) how you get consistent and accurate material. I can't seem to do it no matter what I try. Even with a minimal blade kerf, my boards always get buggered up as they pass by the backside of the blade.

Jim



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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/23/2014 :  12:38:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Ellis

Thayer,

Do you buy your board material for the decks and side/end sheathing already cut to the proper thickness (1/32") or do you cut it to the proper thickness yourself? If you cut it yourself, I'd sure like to know (see) how you get consistent and accurate material. I can't seem to do it no matter what I try. Even with a minimal blade kerf, my boards always get buggered up as they pass by the backside of the blade.

Jim



Don't mean to take the thunder away from Thayer, but in my collection of wood working tools I have a 10" Grizzly table saw. I had the same problem. One thing that can cause that is the fence is not parallel to the saw blade. I've seen that demonstrated many times at woodworking shows I've attended. Check how parallel your fence is with the blade. I'm willing to bet it isn't.

Bernd


WWG1WGA

Country: USA | Posts: 3654 Go to Top of Page

thayer
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/23/2014 :  1:56:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit thayer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've got no thunder to be stolen, it has all been done before. As Bernd says, blade-fence alignment is key.

I am cutting my stock from full scale dimensional poplar that I cherry pick from the racks at our local Lowe's. I first chop the stock into 16-inch lengths for easy handling. Then I go to my ancient 10-inch Craftsman table saw to rip the large pieces into manageable blanks. For the sheathing that means laying the 1xWhatever flat on the table and slicing 1/8 wide strips off the side until I get too close to the blade. I am using a hollow ground veneer blade for this operation and typically set my fence using "feeler gauges" for small stock, in this case a pair of my Sherline parallels stacked together. They are 1/16 thick, so pinching a pair between the blade and the fence gives me a very accurate 1/8 cut. I also check the spacing with the parallels at both the front and rear of the blade after setting the fence with them in the middle.

I then take the 1/8 x 3/4 blanks and lay them flat on the Byrnes and do it again to slice the 1/32 pieces. I am using a .030 slitting saw here, so there is no set to the teeth to create clearance, or chew up the stock on the back side. Careful fence alignment is key to prevent binding and ample use of push sticks and feather boards keep the fingers reasonably safe on both saws.

I check the stock and slices with a micrometer to make sure I am consistently getting the dimensions that I need. Yea, I thought I was being nuts until I did the math. There are 12 horizontal boards on the sides and ends of the boxcar, and if the width is .002 wide I have lost nearly all of the 1/32 extra that I need on the framing at the bottom. Byrnes offers an accessory micrometer head for setting the fence and I use it religiously here for fine-tuning the final width of the stock. Also, my rafter jig above was made using the micrometer head. I don't have any end mills as small as 1/32, so I used the slitting saw on the table saw. The rafters are .869 from one left edge to the next, and setting that consistently was pretty easy using the micrometer head. Once I made the first slot, I offset the fence another .002 and made a second pass to widen the slot just enough for my stock.

Cutting small square stock is much the same operation with the fence set accordingly.

One trick you want to remember is to get the blade high. I was originally taught to raise a table saw blade "only as far above the stock as you want it to cut into your finger", but that doesn't give me the best cut. A low blade is hitting the wood in line with the stock and creates a lot of hammering action and vibration. Raising the blade as much as possible gives a more downward cutting action that helps hold the stock to the table, results in a shorter cutting path per tooth and gives me smoother results.



Edited by - thayer on 07/01/2015 7:29:57 PM

Country: | Posts: 285 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/23/2014 :  2:32:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's some presion work you're doing Thayer.
Very well done.



Country: USA | Posts: 23957 Go to Top of Page

thayer
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/23/2014 :  9:51:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit thayer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Rick.

I found a small chunk of poplar I hadn't stripped up and cut all the supports and a few extras this afternoon. Headed back down to the shop now to cut some planks for the roofing. The numbers add up fast. The roofing alone will eat up over 70 boards per car. I can see why normal people opt for scribed sheet stock.



Country: | Posts: 285 Go to Top of Page

Jim Ellis
Section Hand

Posted - 11/24/2014 :  12:56:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thayer, Bernd,

I'm sure my fence is parallel to my blade...I use a piece of brass bar stock as a feeler gauge to set/check the clearance between both back and front sides of the blade and the fence. I have a lock on each end of my fence to hold it steady. My stripwood looks fine if I do not allow it to pass by the back side of the blade where the damage is done. I think my problem is probably the small blade kerf. I use a Microlux mini table saw with a 10mm arbor. Where do you get your blades and what is the part number?

Jim



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Page: of 38 Previous Topic: 1/48, 1/43, 1/50 - 25, 28, 32, 40 mm, figure ref. Topic Next Topic: Coast Line RR vol 7  
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