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 New 18'-0" boxcar Build
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Author Previous Topic: 1/48, 1/43, 1/50 - 25, 28, 32, 40 mm, figure ref. Topic Next Topic: Coast Line RR vol 7
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mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2011 :  10:18:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just got the book of RR Freight Cars by John White (Smithsonian) which is a definitive works on wood cars.
Hundreds of early photos with lettering, all prior to 1923. Jon's info is great and as he said, if your time period is before 1923 than either side of the door is OK.
Many photos show right hand side lettering and logos. And of course as Jon said, if it's a NG line, than almost anything goes.
Personally, I like the idea of a variety and will letter my cars accordingly.



Country: USA | Posts: 6703 Go to Top of Page

Richard Gardner
Section Hand



Posted - 11/09/2011 :  11:43:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom... jeesh, we have a druggie on our list!

Seriously, I know just how you feel. I'm on no less than 8 medications for diabetes and heart problems. My hands are shaky enough I had to give up painting and illustration. At least with modeling I can lock one hand with the other for fine detail. My eyesight is shot too, but I handle that with optivisors. If we all only had the rock-steady hands of Joels Kirk!

I've attached a jpeg of how your lettering might look. I don't have the Railroad Roman typeface, I used Century Schoolbook Bold which is quite close.



I think it's so cool that you have a speeder! That's gotta be a hoot! We all bring such a wide variety of experiences to the table.

I don't know if y'all picked up on it or not, but Jerry drove the big trains most of his life. Well, maybe not most. He tells me he used to build models in his cab while waiting for another train to pass by. It doesn't get any better than that.

Rick...

Thanks for the kind words. When I started this build, my motive was to pass on some information I've gathered through the years. Little did I know that it would turn out like this. The participation from some very knowledgeable members is what has surprised me the most. I'm learning far more than i'm giving out!

Dave...

I know where you're coming from. Even though I don't interchange, my time period is much later than 1923. I haven't decided what year yet exactly, but if I want to establish clues as to the timeline, this would be one way of helping out. I'm attaching a photo that I ran across while searching for something else. This was given to me several years ago by Doug MacLeod when we were discussing early hardware. It's a fine example of pre 1923 lettering...

BTW... Dave has been most modest as he's not mentioned he owns On30 IMA which produces excellent models. Check him out at:

http://www.on30ima.com



I think that covers everything for now...

Richard










Edited by - Richard Gardner on 11/09/2011 3:25:09 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 81 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2011 :  3:17:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Richard but just drop the /index.html and you'll get the website.

My modeling era is 1919 so I don't have to meet the 1923 regulations yet, plus they can still buy booze in my timeline.



Edited by - mabloodhound on 11/09/2011 3:18:52 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6703 Go to Top of Page

BBLmber
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2011 :  4:04:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a question about roofs. Other than the wooden roof used in these cars what other types of roofs were used?


Mark


W,L,&E

Country: USA | Posts: 6444 Go to Top of Page

Richard Gardner
Section Hand



Posted - 11/09/2011 :  4:16:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BBLmber

Here is a question about roofs. Other than the wooden roof used in these cars what other types of roofs were used?

Mark



Hi Mark...

I think I can answer that without being slain where I stand...

The actual structural composition of boxcar roofs was for the most part either wood (early) or metal (later). The metal roofs do not usually require any protective coating. Many of the wooden roofs had no additional protective coating other than the wood itself. some shops attempted to prolong roof life with an additional covering. There were all kinds including but not limited to thin metal, corrugated, tar paper and canvas. Others may chime in with more observations...

Richard











Country: USA | Posts: 81 Go to Top of Page

morganhillmodels
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/09/2011 :  7:27:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit morganhillmodels's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mark,
I've done a stockcar with a corrugated roof (a bit of South American flavor)




and a boxcar with tarpaper roof



Most western lines seemed to use wooden roofs. The C&S had a metal Murphy roof on a few Boxcars. I believe the Maine 2 footer's used metal seamed roofs on several cars too. I have not tried to model a car with a seamed metal roof. I would like to give it a go some time the weathering would be a challenge.



Edited by - morganhillmodels on 11/09/2011 7:29:10 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 238 Go to Top of Page

BBLmber
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2011 :  8:23:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the info, the reason I asked is that I was thinking about an outside framed car that the siding had been replaced by metal sheating and a metal roof. Sorta of a retro fit or modorization. What do you all think? I model the 40's and early 50's.

Mark


W,L,&E

Country: USA | Posts: 6444 Go to Top of Page

swissrails
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/10/2011 :  10:01:18 AM  Show Profile  Visit swissrails's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Jon,

Those pictures look great--very inspiring. subtle weathering, nice hardware--something we can all aspire to.

Thanks for sharing the finished models.


Peter (swissrails)

http://www.randomrailroad.blogspot.com

Country: USA | Posts: 443 Go to Top of Page

BBLmber
Fireman



Posted - 11/10/2011 :  10:06:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Jon, what are you using for grabirons on your cars? Thanks, the cars look great.

Mark


W,L,&E

Edited by - BBLmber on 11/10/2011 10:08:15 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6444 Go to Top of Page

swissrails
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/10/2011 :  10:08:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit swissrails's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yes,

Do tell, that hardware looks fantastic, it really stands out as exceptional.

P


Peter (swissrails)

http://www.randomrailroad.blogspot.com

Country: USA | Posts: 443 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 11/10/2011 :  10:17:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Freight car roofs have a length section in John Whites book on American Freight cars.
It was important to keep content dry and this was a loosing battle. With brakemen walking the roofs, damage was always a problem, especially drovers with cattle prods.
Double roofs were very common with the attempt to allow the inside roof to actually do the water protection.
Metal and canvas on the exterior were used but with a very short lifetime (less than 5 years). Metal as the "under" roof was more successful with the top wood roof being a wear surface.
Of course the lifetime of a boxcar in the late 19th/early 20th century was only considered to be around 20 years. Narrow gauge lines could expect more because they were not subject to the interchange woes and poor treatment of standard gauge cars.



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Jerry Kitts
New Hire



Posted - 11/10/2011 :  4:20:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good Afternoon All,

Working on some updates of my outside framed box car, and some notes on door tracks, and other ramblings.



I got the deck done and added some details to the frame, truss rods, truss rod end bolts, and truss rod plate and nuts to the bolster.



I got a better shot of the Grandt Line #95 detail parts this time. Also shows the nuts for the end of the truss rods.



I got the side walls up. Very fragile at this point. Adding the end walls and the piece of framing across the top of walls to nail the roof to will make it strong. I scribed the styrene, I fear shooting the white styrene with dark styrene the scribed lines disappeared, I guess you'll have to wait for paint to see the scribing.



I added a painted ventilated box car of the same size to show the how the car will bulk up when the all the parts are in place.



This photo is about couplers. In my view the HO Kadee coupler operates wonderfully and does all that you would expect a Kadee coupler to do. The problem I see is that looking at the photo the coupler size tends to make the car look S scale standard gauge. Were the much more scale coupler on the outside framed build tends to look very scale and shows the car off for what it is, a very small box car. Another opinion of mine would be that small cars and engines need full scale parts and trucks to help show how small the equipment really is. By using HO couplers and trucks and perhaps even S scale detail parts help make the car look more like a full size On3 car. As a real live rivet counter I find this a little hard to enjoy. It was one of the things that I found refreshing about Richard's approach to the build.



I picked a black and white photo to be able to insert it as large as possible. I added the photo to help with issues with door tracks. Hope it helps.

Jerry



Jerry
Diamond Springs and Fiddletown Ry.

Country: USA | Posts: 37 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 11/10/2011 :  4:48:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice Jerry. I wouldn't have the patience to scribe all that styrene.



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Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/10/2011 :  5:39:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jerry,

Great detail and explanation of what you are doing.


Tom M.

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morganhillmodels
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/10/2011 :  7:21:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit morganhillmodels's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Jerry,
Well said, this is an often overlooked detail many On30 modelers don't consider when starting out. I have been guilty myself of using the Kadee #5's for most of my builds but I think I am going to start using the more appropriate sized couplers you are using. Modelers that first modeled prototype on3 equipment and moved over to On30 I think find using "correctly scale" hardware for the smaller cars to be second nature.

Peter/Mark,
The grabs on the cars are from Precision Scale Co. part#PD-5624

I have felt they were a bit oversized and they broke very easily. I now use Tichy 18" wire grabs an Macleod western N-46 nbw's.

Jerry, how did you model the lower door guide on the ventilated car?




Edited by - morganhillmodels on 11/10/2011 7:24:48 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 238 Go to Top of Page
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