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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/12/2014 :  08:25:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Mark!


Country: USA | Posts: 12935 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 01/12/2014 :  10:10:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Mark. I love how the town rises above the harbour. There will be so many showstopping scenes when the project is completed. Super planning!

Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Country: | Posts: 11492 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 01/12/2014 :  4:09:40 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Thanks so much for your comments Frederic, Carl, Mike and Mike! I thought this post might get completely lost in all the new challenge posts! It sure is going to be hard work keeping up with them all!

Frederic - I met one of the guys who works at Weta at the Wellington convention in 2012. He actually plays the hands of Bilbo when he fondles the ring in front of the fire place in the shire in the first movie. Famous hands! They also have a spinoff company called Wingnut models That from an account of the best modeller I know in the flesh are the best model aeroplane models in the world.

http://www.idealog.co.nz/magazine/37/new-model-airforce

Mike - Its nice to see the planning slowly becoming reality. I'm keen to get the corner module into position - but I want to get the layout detached from the walls and a backdrop attached to it before I do.

One thing the changing of the layout shape did do was to really define the new water shape. Naturally, that got me thinking about the kind of vessels I wanted in the harbour, their size and number. A while ago I was considering buying a Lindberg 'North Atlantic fishing trawler' with the intention of bashing it into something else. A built up one came up on Trade me locally and I bought it for $8. This may seem very cheap, but it was put together extremely poorly. Based on the detail I saw I bought a new model, but thought I might try practicing on the pre built one. I know very little about sea going vessels and have never built one. Whereas I am quite happy to kit bash a structure model, a ship is another matter.

OK. Against my better judgement I have decided to share some photos of this trial kit-bash! As said - the model was very poorly put together. Almost everything was misaligned, there was glue everywhere, huge gaps etc, etc. So unless by some miracle this turns out acceptable, it is really just a exercise in getting familiar with ships and how to bash them.

Here is the original product. I'm working along side several pictures and plans from a 2004 Gazette as a guide.


First was to cut down the hull to waterline. There is a waterline mark on the kit, but from examining all the pics of steamers tied up in dock, it did not appear right. I angled my line slightly, leaving the stern raised a bit. The hull at the stern end was then prised apart and reattached in alignment and the housing removed.


I then disassembled most of the housing and reassembled it (walls were upside down, back to front, enormous gaps - hello {hello.....hello.....hello.....)!!! I cut a middle section out of the housing and tweaked so the front sections 'wings' would fit around the back section.


I made up a stack from a piece of pipe and placed the two sections of the housing in position on the hull.


The front mast was removed and turned around 90 degrees. It will need modifying.


And here she is from above. I am going to put one large hold in the centre.


I'm sure there are problems a plenty (and don't hold back on letting me know!!!) The main two my friend pointed out were the shape of the stack (now changed) and the angle of the stern. I'm modelling the 1930's and he suggested this was a far more modern shape. All the tramp steamers of that area have pretty much vertical sterns. I have been thinking about ways of hiding this. Perhaps a hanging scaffold and some tarps while some quick repairs are undertaken while the ship is being unloaded and reloaded? I'm also wondering about the banana like shape of the whole ship? It seems to be far more exaggerated than 1930 ships?

Anyway - this is where I am up to. The challenge has kicked in so time on this project will be limited!


More soon, cheers, Mark




Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1040 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 01/12/2014 :  4:37:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ahoy Mark!
Boy, sure does seem to be a lot of ship modeling going on around the forums these days!
I like your changes so far,and considering that you started with a poorly built model to begin with.You have performed miracles already on her!
Excellent work cutting the hull,to make her a waterline model.
The funnel looks okay to me,your forward mast is pointing backwards though.(Oops! read about that)
The mast lamps are pointing to the stern instead of the bow.
And because your modeling the 30's some of that stuff sticking out from the pilot house,might be questionable.(The one in front of the funnel looks like a dish of some sort.)
And she has no anchors,that I can see,other then that,for $8.00 bucks, you have yourself a diamond in the ruff!
I look forward to seeing what you do with her!
Start with a name for her,so I can call her by name.

Greg Shinnie



Edited by - Ensign on 01/12/2014 8:03:50 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 8279 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/13/2014 :  07:44:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The funnel size depends mostly on whether it's got steam or diesel power; boilers need draft, but the exhaust for a marine diesel that size might be 2 foot diameter. The hull shape doesn't look so off to me, but I'm not an expert. I expect part of that would be the service the hull is designed for - winter North Atlantic is the most conservative Plimsoll line, and the trawler has a "northern waters" look. A yard building for tropical or west coast service might use a cheaper hull shape.


Country: USA | Posts: 5860 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/13/2014 :  08:06:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mark-

I like what I see and I like what you've done!

Please carry on!

(Sorry no ideas from me, I'm a novice in this here boat stuff too...)



Country: USA | Posts: 3354 Go to Top of Page

Carrie Creek
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/13/2014 :  1:34:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, Your changes are very good as James stated this looks very much like a North Sea coaster they are in character. I would change the rake of the mast so that they are much more vertical, too much rake for the 30's. I would also get rid of that thing on the front of the bridge.

You haven't mentioned what scale this is so depending on it's length would help determine it's power plant. A diesel would not be out of place and as your engine room below decks doesn't seem to be very big I would go with one. Diesels were used in WWI in the U-boats so by the 30's were definitely in use.
Hope this helps.


Phil Z
POR (press on regardless)

Country: USA | Posts: 1508 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 01/13/2014 :  11:28:08 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Thanks fro the replies Greg, jbvb, Carl and Phil, they are much appreciated!

Greg - the front mast was only blue tacked in for the photo, so will be easy to turn around. I'll cut off some of the dubious modern looking gadgets. One of the anchors is missing, but I might look at getting some better ones if it turns out ok. I personally liked the look of the larger funnel, but might try a smaller one in light of some of the later comments. I'll give the name some thought.

Thanks for your input jbvb. Its good the hull looks ok, but my layout is set on the West Coast of New Zealand, so might have to do some further investigation re shape latter attempts.

Thanks Phil. I'll change the rake of the masts - it was one thing that didn't look right to me also. The ship is around 18" long which makes her around 130'. As I said, I like the look of the bigger funnel, but will make up a smaller one to see.

And thanks Carl for the thumbs up!

Loving all the help! Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1040 Go to Top of Page

Carrie Creek
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/14/2014 :  12:17:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, you can always say that it was steam fired but as a cost saving you upgraded it to diesel and stick a short stack out of the top of the big funnel

Phil Z
POR (press on regardless)

Country: USA | Posts: 1508 Go to Top of Page

grlakeslogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/14/2014 :  12:42:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,
That hull form looks fine to me too, but that mast is definitely turned 180 degrees.
Best of luck on your build!


--Stu--
It's a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

Country: USA | Posts: 870 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/14/2014 :  08:26:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've never visited NZ, but I've certainly heard about the "roaring 40s" and the size of waves in that part of the Pacific. Conditions can be quite severe, but it doesn't matter to most commercial shipping because it isn't really on the way from anywhere important to anywhere else important. But trawlers go where the fish are. Searching for images of "new zealand trawler" I found some coastal designs, some really serious deep water/whatever the weather designs and photos of a 15 meter trawler getting rolled over by a rogue wave trying to enter a harbor.


Country: USA | Posts: 5860 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 01/14/2014 :  11:47:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mark, great looking bash on the trawler. Iím in for boats of all types and this oneís got great lines. At 18Ē do you think it could survive another cut in the middle to bring the length down any more? I could use one but 18Ē is too long for my Wreckerís Reef project. BTW whatís the beam?

Freighters like this one always conjure up great sea stories. Canít wait to hear yours.



Edited by - Frank Palmer on 01/14/2014 12:00:52 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5282 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 01/14/2014 :  4:15:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Your rehabilitation project is looking good to this mate's eyes! I, too, love marine vessels in all shapes and sizes. Can't wait to see the magic you spell on this rehab, Mark!

Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Country: | Posts: 11492 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 01/14/2014 :  9:21:40 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the continued cheering from the side lines Phil, Stu, jbvb, Frank and Mike!

I spent last night working on my aerated water complex, so no further progress as yet.

Frank - she is about 3 2/5" across at the widest point (HO scale - about 24.5 scale feet). I think you could cut up to four inches of length out of the middle, but it would be difficult to hide the seam. Still - you wont have to pay anything like the postage I had to, so it might be worth a try. I think I bought the kit for $36 US new?

jbvb - the Greymouth bar is notorious in New Zealand. When the Grey river is in flood crossing the bar is very dangerous. But when the fishing boats are full of fish and empty of ice they are faced with a tough decision.

More soon, Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1040 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/18/2014 :  04:41:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, I am not - and by far - an expert of any kind about ship modelling, and in particular about the evolution of ship shapes between the 1930s and today. But I for sure love what you've done so far on this one.
What kind of tool did you use to cut the hull at waterline?



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page
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