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 Is real siding 80 feet long?
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Newcastle Kid
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/16/2011 :  7:39:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The ponce wheel/nail hole look is used for a more 1:1 appearance but, what about siding boards over 16 feet long? Anyone aware of the use of scale lengths of siding/strip wood.Some boards would be 40 feet long in 1:1, not realistic at all.
John Kerekes
Graduate, summa cum laude
Armchair Model Railroad Institute

Country: Canada | Posts: 170

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2011 :  7:44:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use a knife to slice siding into 8 or 12 foot legths and then run a knife under some of the siding boards and pull up the ends.

Here is a piece of siding I am working on now.

I went a little too far with the nail holes on this one.


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closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2011 :  11:33:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Evening all.
16 feet and under seems to be the length most built with. Nothing over 16 is really true to scale. Yet, I'm sure someone can show longer boards used.
Mike M



Country: USA | Posts: 1855 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2011 :  01:06:33 AM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I always cut my boards to 16', then use any off cuts to start another row or fill in small areas, between windows and such. Scribed sheet stock needs to have the board ends cut in as Larry described.

Ponce wheels never appealed to me personally, the holes they produce, as far as I can tell, generally are the wrong shape, the wrong size and often in the wrong place, this is only my opinion and many modellers love them.

Just becuase the stripwood or scribed siding measures out to 40 scale feet doesnt mean you have to use it that way, thats where 'modelling' comes in, actually doing your own thing to make it look realistic, at least in your own eyes. Each persons view of that is different.

As Mike says, boards of over 16' could probably be found, especially on much older structures, but 16' is the more acceptable norm.

So I guess in answer to your actual question......
quote:
Originally posted by Newcastle Kid

what about siding boards over 16 feet long? Anyone aware of the use of scale lengths of siding/strip wood.Some boards would be 40 feet long in 1:1, not realistic at all.

Yes...., many people are aware of using scale lengths of stripwood and the fact that 40' boards are not realistic.

I think the majority of the structures you will find here on the forums are built that way.

Karl.A



Country: USA | Posts: 6276 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2011 :  06:59:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree with everything Karl just said. Using seperate boards does make it easier,
although, working in a larger scale I find that I model nail heads rather than nail holes.

Cheers,
Bob




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mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2011 :  09:30:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What everyone else said above plus, try to have your board ends fall on a stud.
Usually on 16" centers but older structures that were built prior to 1900 may have 24" stud centers or even oddball spacing.
You should avoid random cut lengths as this was not the norm (although there is a prototype for everything ).



Country: USA | Posts: 6700 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2011 :  1:06:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sgtbob

I find that I model nail heads rather than nail holes.

Cheers,
Bob






Show off !!


Karl.A



Country: USA | Posts: 6276 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2011 :  1:32:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK Karl.A,
It took me a moment to see that. hope it's in fun (I know it is) because otherwise I'm out-a-here. I love
to see what others are doing (such as you) and I will gladly explain anything I'm doing, but I sure don't want to be a show-off.

Even working in a smaller scale I think ponce wheels are too regular, they look like a sting of holes made by a pounce wheel.
Carpenters are not that perfact.

As you know, working in 1/24 scale, nail holes would not look good anyway.

The "nail heads" at the bottom where the wood is rotted are pieces of small styrene rod, glued into holes, clipped off flush, and painted brown.
The bent nails in the door are fine wire, painted brown.
I can never get a good photo, but nails up on the painted boards are represented with a tool
I made by sharpening a small piece of brass tubeing and setting it in a wooden handle.
I can go up the line a press in "nail heads". Ones that I want the paint peeled off,
I paint brown, otherwise I just leave the small round impressions.



Cheers,
Bob



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UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2011 :  1:50:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
certainly in fun Bob. I'm a great admirer of your work.
I had heard of a very similar way of doing the heads to your brass tube method. It involved using an old drafting pencil in he same manner you describe. Not sure how often you need to resharpen your brass tube but I know when I was doing this for something sililar I found the brass too soft to remain sharp for long. Not sure if you also have this problem but if so maybe the drafting pencil would be an alternative as I'm sure the metal would be much harder/durable.

Infact typing this response has given me another idea for a solution to one of my problems, so thanks!!!

Karl.A



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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/18/2011 :  09:42:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Karl, I can't wait to see both your problem and your solution !!! Always something inovative.
Bob


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mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 01/18/2011 :  1:45:17 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi all.

I think if you looked long enough you would find boards up to 21 feet long. 16 foot is probably most likely. Remember builders liked longer boards as it meant less work.

Generally speaking, weatherboards should have only one nail showing per board, towards the botton of the board. A second nail, the first one put in, is hidden by the lap of the board above.

Studs are set out with regards to the rooms inside a building. A corner stud, and then 2 foot (or 18") centres to the far corner of the room (not structure). There are also opening studs each side of any door or window, and these are normally nailed to, although the nails are hidden by the window and door facings. There are studs at the external corners of the structure.

When building a two or three story building, the structure is built (at least where I live) floor by floor. As the internal room structure is not likely to be identicle on each floor, it is unlikely that the studs will all line up from bottom to top. For greater realism, consider the layout of the internal rooms of the structure, and put nailholes where the resultant studs would be.

Hope this is of some help,
Cheers, Mark.



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Wulf
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 02/20/2011 :  09:34:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HiGuys
The mill we lived in that we just moved out of :( (timberframe) was built in 1880, had true 2x4 (not nominal) studs on 2' centres. Siding was 6" (average) boards, a few of them 20' long - the wood having been cut & milled on-site. Longer was certainly available - some of the timbers are 36', and I did find a 28' 3x8 (old growth white oak, quartersawn, true dimensions - unfortunately half rotten but did salvage about 8'worth of it)
So it appears thaat even if it could be had, those lengths for siding were probably just too awkward for folks to want to deal with anyways.
Cheers,
Ron


CEO, Lancre Valley Steam navigation Co.

Country: Canada | Posts: 185 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 02/20/2011 :  10:53:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wulf


So it appears that even if it could be had, those lengths for siding were probably just too awkward for folks to want to deal with anyways.
Ron



That's exactly the point, Ron. The carpenter didn't want to have two men and a boy to put up siding.
However, the beams were another issue as it would take 2 or 3 men to get them up anyways and the longer ones (without a joint) would be stronger, so they were used for the frame work.



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