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Author Previous Topic: My Underground Railway, a New Home and a New Name Topic Next Topic: L&WS Construction Series
Page: of 21

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 12/29/2010 :  11:11:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Cliff! As the age-old saying goes...if you want to get something done, give the job to a busy person and they'll prioritize their time accordingly. As a fellow elementary school teacher, I can vouch that Cliff is one heck of a busy lad with his Kindergarten troup! I know this latest project will turn out magnificently...and on time. Good on ya, Cliff!

Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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mainetrains
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2010 :  8:03:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As always Cliff...simply outstanding. It will be
a great pleasure to follow along as you bring
the yard to life!
Really like your stable of locomotives.

Dave


"there's something happening here, what it is ain't exactly clear"

Country: USA | Posts: 1480 Go to Top of Page

Jerry M
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2010 :  8:49:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Cliff that's a huge layout and a shame to let it sit, but it happens to all of us.....I sometimes go a couple of months and don't touch a thing and then all of a sudden get the bug and build like crazy, because of this quirk in my own personality I have learned not to get in a hurry about tearing down a layout when my interests stray, done it twice and regretted it later. Looking forward to your progress....


Country: USA | Posts: 4055 Go to Top of Page

maandg
Engine Wiper



Posted - 12/29/2010 :  9:54:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit maandg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks to everyone for the continued warm welcome and interest in this project. Despite spending this afternoon taking down all of the Christmas decorations and going out last night for my 19th Anniversary / 48th Birthday (yes, same day!), I still managed to finish the first of the six tenements, plus complete all of the walls for two more.

Here are what the wall sections look like after paint and weathering.



Since I wanted a white-washed appearance, I created a “stain” using a brush first dipped in Floquil Reefer White, followed by a touch of Dio-Sol as a thinner. This creates more of a wash than a paint. After the stain had dried, I applied a wash of Alcohol/India Ink. For the lifted clapboards, I turned the wall section upside-down and added more India ink wash under the lifted sections. This made them pop and appear more rotten.



Next, the laser-cut acetate was added to the windows. I modeled about half of the windows open to varying degrees. After all, this is N’awlins without air-conditioning. Yikes!! I made curtains from small sections of double-ply paper towel, then separated into single ply pieces. Some are positioned to look like they are blowing out of the window.





Next I added the roof. Because of the height of the upper deck, the roofs will not be seen. For photos, I went ahead and detailed it anyway. To simulate tar marks, I laid lines of yellow glue across the roof and against the sides of the wall. When dried, I painted the roof grimy black and weathered with pastel powder. No paper was used due to the fact that it won’t be seen anyway. I’m happy with how it turned out.



The last step involved assembling the rails and stairs. This was a slow process, but easy to do. All of the woodwork was simply stained with the India ink wash. The porch roof was covered with paper strips supplied with the kit and finished using the same methods for the main roof. Here are the results.





The only thing left to do is add details like the clotheslines, laundry, people and general clutter. These will be added once all six buildings are completed and mounted on the pink foam. My next installment will document progress to that point. I go back to school on January 3, so my work pace will slow slightly. Thanks for following along! Happy New Year to All!


Cliff Powers
The Mississippi Alabama & Gulf
Please visit my layout website at
www.magnoliaroute.com

Edited by - maandg on 12/29/2010 10:08:22 PM

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hunter48820
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2010 :  11:07:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cliff, I look at your pics with amazement. The detail and realism that you achieve is wonderful. I can't wait to see the finished scene. It gives me such hope for my layout if I can get just a fraction of your perfection!!



Look out for #1, but don't step in #2!

Andy Keeney
Dewitt, MI

Edited by - hunter48820 on 12/30/2010 06:48:32 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6117 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/29/2010 :  11:16:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cliff,

I'm awed at the rapidity of your progress! You've nailed the tenements, or "three-deckahs," as they're known in New England. Very nicely done!

Do you hire out?

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6778 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/30/2010 :  12:44:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I do like your 'staining' approach. A real nice weathered look! Keep it coming Cliff!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/30/2010 :  07:08:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Happy birthday/anniversary, Cliff. You’re off to a good start with that nice looking tenement.

George



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Danny Head
Fireman

Posted - 12/30/2010 :  09:36:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cliff, good to see your new thread. I will be watching your progress. I hope to see this in person someday.


Country: USA | Posts: 1889 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/30/2010 :  10:12:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Never having lived in New Orleans, would the prototype have used cedar, redwood or cypress and left it unpainted? In New England, porches were pretty much universally painted until pressure-treated wood appeared in the 1970s. I suppose they could have used chestnut before the blight, but that goes back to WWI. I can't really imagine relaxing on a creosote-treated porch in hot weather, though it would certainly provide a nostalgic railroad atmosphere...


Country: USA | Posts: 5978 Go to Top of Page

maandg
Engine Wiper



Posted - 12/30/2010 :  11:21:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit maandg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Andy, Pete, Mark and George for the positive comments! Danny, I would love to have you arrange for a visit sometime. I'm glad you'll be along for the ride, cause if you approve "I done good".

James, I'm not sure what type of wood was used in the construction of these types of dwellings. Since I tend to approach the hobby more from an artistic viewpoint, I usually don't give it that much thought. I'm glad you asked, though, because I meant to post this prototype New Orleans photo which inspired me to add the tenements in the first place.



According to the source, this was a photo from the 50s era. Notice that the railings appear to be unpainted. You can see a trace amount of white paint on the walls. I reference the obviously white structure in the left background for comparison. Adding residents and laundry on the upper deck as seen here will add a lot to the atmosphere of the scene. I think that's one reason I love modeling the south - capturing the mood of a scene. Southern vignettes seem to ooze atmosphere. In this photo I can literally feel the oppressive humidity.

I also like the contrast of the bright, cheerful billboard right next to the dingy run-down tenement. This is the type of ambience I try to convey on my layout. If that sometimes seems to be in conflict with the rules of prototypical accuracy, I'm alright with that. When I begin on the backdrop, you'll see little evidence of the prototype New Orleans skyline. But I hope that the look still "feels right"; even to people familiar with the area. My desire is that people view my layout almost like a painting in a gallery that draws the viewer into the artist's world. I'm not claiming to be an artist by any means - and I hope my Union Passenger Terminal expresses my drive for prototypical accuracy as well. My goal is to strike a balance between the two.

Long answer - but hopefully sheds some light on my approach to modeling and the project as a whole. Thanks for following my progress!!


Cliff Powers
The Mississippi Alabama & Gulf
Please visit my layout website at
www.magnoliaroute.com

Country: | Posts: 474 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/30/2010 :  11:46:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cliff,

Good explanation!

Note the slatted shutters on the house to the right of the photo; I've never seen these in the north, but they're all over the south. Might be an option to consider.

For the backdrop, if you have NOLA pix from the area, and there are signature "skyscrapers," you might want to consider adding them, even if they're partially obscured by haze/humidity (read: "require no talent to include"). A period photo of Boston, for instance, will show the Custom House tower, which was for decades the tallest building in the city. New York had the Empire State Building; San Francisco the Coit Tower. And although my Mom grew up in NOLA, I have no idea of what the signature buildings were. Or are.... May have to do some research!

On the other hand, you can certainly invoke Rule One. In that regard, the obvious quality of your foreground will undoubtedly captivate your audience to the point where the presence or absence of background is immaterial. I certainly wouldn't notice an absence of backdrop!

Keep the pix coming!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6778 Go to Top of Page

maandg
Engine Wiper



Posted - 12/30/2010 :  1:35:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit maandg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Pete! There will be a backdrop around all three walls of the New Orleans level. These will primarily consist of a mix-n-match assortment of Radical Flats, SceniKing and Realistic Backgrounds componants. I have done exhaustive research on the internet for a couple of years now trying to find COLOR photos of the New Orleans skyline from the 1950s. The ones that I have found would not lend themselves to being blown up to the correct size for use as a backdrop due to low resolution and/or file size. I did find a nice 3-sheet image of the Fulton Bag Co. which I plan to use. I would pay big bucks for a scale 20-foot photo mural of the waterfront taken from the river in the 40's-50's. I hope that by incorporating lots of vintage signage on buildings and billboards speciic to New Orleans that I can come reasonably close in a generic sort of way. I will document backdrop installation throughout this thread. I plan on completing each section of layout completely (structures, backdrop, details, scenery) about 3-feet at a time. That's how I built the middle level, BTW. Stay tuned!!

Cliff Powers
The Mississippi Alabama & Gulf
Please visit my layout website at
www.magnoliaroute.com

Country: | Posts: 474 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 12/30/2010 :  5:59:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cliff, have you tried posting a request to some of the photography forums/websites for a quality pic? Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

dnhman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/30/2010 :  7:22:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cliff, As with all your other threads i will be following along closey and for sure taking notes,,, Your work is awesume,, Thanks for sharing with us,

Cheers!, Joe

Country: USA | Posts: 1096 Go to Top of Page
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