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 Making Big Pines and Firs
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Author Previous Topic: Roundhouse HO Locomotives Translating to 55n3 Topic Next Topic: First wagon in Scale55
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closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/06/2009 :  7:28:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi All.
I was lucky enough to be able to converse at length with a US Forrest Service agent about the trees located on our property. I learned a lot about height and width of the Pines and Firs. The length of branch is dependent on how many other trees are around and how close they are growing together. The more trees, the shorter the branch. The lower branches are killed off by the tree itself to conserve energy if light is scarce.A lone tree will have branches closer to the ground where as a thick stand will only have branches higher up.
After a zillion hours of research on pine tree making I wanted to share a quick way that I am going about making trunks and than finished trees for the layout.
First the the real tree..

This is a ninety foot (90') Pine located at 7500' in Big Bear Lake California.

A finished tree and one under construction Both are around 110' and have 4 ft diameter trunk.



A finished tree at 115' with a 4 1/2' trunk



And a forest of 35 tree's in size from 42' to 130' in HO scale.



The smaller trees are Sweet Water Trunks. The larger are balsa. Foliage is Bragdon Industries fine scale foliage. I'll follow with the tools and process of trunk making. It's really simple.

Country: USA | Posts: 1855

closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/06/2009 :  7:57:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
So here are the tools .

The big file is a 2 sided horse shoeing file. You're looking at the fine side. They are available at any tack and feed store. I've used this one for 35 years as a cabinetmaker. You need some cutting tools, tweezers, foam blocks, and a scale ruler as well as white or yellow wood glue water and acrylic paints. Also #6 x 1 1/2" finish nails.


Some kind of drilling machine with a good quality and sharp #61 bit.



Country: USA | Posts: 1855 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 12/06/2009 :  8:20:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, could I ask for a small favor please could you take a nice close up of the foliage with something obvious for scale next to it? The trees are really nice, can't wait to see the rest of your how to. Thanks Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

flatsguide
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/06/2009 :  9:01:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The trees look very nice. Scale trees really dwarf every thing. But I think the effect sets a mood that ties every thing together.
I just started last week making trees using Caspia but would like to find something more realistic. ditto what Belg said.

Thanks Richard



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Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2009 :  03:31:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, the comparison between a real tree and your models shows that you've rendered very well the shape of the pine. The foliage material seems interesting and I'd be glad, like Pat and Richard, to see a close-up on this Bragdon foliage.



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

scotchpine
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/07/2009 :  09:15:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great!! I love those tall trees!! specialy when they are also exact on scale...doesn't matter if they are, in HO, 3 feet high!=))
thanks

I just wanted to post something with the same "title and subject... "I do not want to "hijack"(?) your thread...
Can I post overhere ,or do I have to post a new thread about this???
It is about this kind of firtrees but in HO scale:
the pic shows a N scale tree
[URL=http://imagefra.me/view.php?img=/1/12/4/groveden/f_197a09tansmm_355af73.jpg&srv=img40][/URL]

Jos



Edited by - scotchpine on 12/07/2009 09:22:06 AM

Country: Netherlands | Posts: 350 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2009 :  09:19:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, thanks for starting this thread. Your trees look great. Nice to see them being made to the correct height for the scale.
Too many times trees are too small. With them being the correct height it definitely adds a sense of realism.



Country: USA | Posts: 23299 Go to Top of Page

closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2009 :  7:42:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here are requested foliage pictures
The first shows you what size is available. There is quite a bit that is smaller and is perfect for smaller trees.


A close up of texture, shape and color


This tray contains about 3 1/2 packages of the bulk product before sorting and triming


Sorted and trimmed to length. The actual shaping takes place after the tree is assembled.

I chose this material because it was the closest thing I could find that would let me make the species of pine I wanted to make. Some of this will be used to make Fir trees also. There is foliage in the packs that have a different leaf texture that mimics Fir branches well. I deliberately did not want Christmas Tree style trees.



Country: USA | Posts: 1855 Go to Top of Page

closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2009 :  8:17:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Lets make a Trunk. For a 5' approx. diameter trunk, I start out with a length of 1/2" balsa.

Start with the coarse side of the file and using the weight of the file, knock off the 4 edges of the stick


Continue with the coarse side and slowly turn and file around the stick. Just keep the stick turning and the file moving at a 45 degree angle to the stick


The pines I'm modeling are straight for 3/4's of the trunk, so start your taper about 3/4 the way up. Just keep filing and turning . It will take a few attempts to get the feel for this.


It will end up like this at the top


And this at the trunk/root end.


I don't use a lot of pressure to file. I let the tool do the work, so I just hand hold as I go. No fancy vise or jig.



Country: USA | Posts: 1855 Go to Top of Page

closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2009 :  8:31:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Next I drill for the #6 penny nail, insert it 1/2 way and using my linesman pliers, I nip of the head at a 45 degree angle.





3" x 3" blocks seem to support the height well and its ready for staining.

The file leaves a great bark texture in the balsa trunk



Country: USA | Posts: 1855 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman



Posted - 12/07/2009 :  9:35:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Philip's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very Nice!

Best yet!

Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2978 Go to Top of Page

kay4pacific
Fireman



Posted - 12/07/2009 :  11:28:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great show and tell. Thanks.


Country: USA | Posts: 4765 Go to Top of Page

closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/08/2009 :  9:42:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Staining is easy.. I use acrylic paints. I water down Burnt Umber and black. Brown trunks are all burnt umber and I add black depending on how dark I want the Trunk. I stain them bottom to top with the trunk upside down. Pop them in a piece a foam. Soak up the extra stain and I leave them for 24 hours to dry before drilling.








Country: USA | Posts: 1855 Go to Top of Page

flatsguide
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/09/2009 :  12:35:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you again for the tutorial. I was curious if the leaf/branch material is a fern of some kind. Also, how do you like your xy table? What make or seller?
Keep up on the great tree bonanza tutorial.

Thanks, Richard



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Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/09/2009 :  08:27:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm also glad you're talking the time to put this tutorial together and sharing it with us.


Country: USA | Posts: 23299 Go to Top of Page

closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/09/2009 :  09:22:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Richard
The drill press is the MicroMark MicroLux variable speed drill press. And yes I like this tool very much. I played around with a Table Top Rockwell drill press for years at work and when I got back into modeling last year no matter how I tried, I could not get the wobble out of the arbor.
I tried changing belts, used a miniature chuck inset,yet run out was 1/16". Not good for accurate drilling.
The XY table is also from micro mark and so far I've been happy with it. I'll be putting it to the test this weekend when I start building 11 foot flats with the trucks I ordered from Bitter Creek Models.



Country: USA | Posts: 1855 Go to Top of Page
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