Railroad Line Forums - Power pole connections
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 6 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 110 ]  [ Total: 116 ]  [ Newest Member: Tintic Range ]
 All Forums
 General Forums
 Reference & Research
 Power pole connections
Next Page
 New Topic |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: Intertwining turn table Topic Next Topic: Hardwick & Woodbury Railroad
Page: of 2

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  07:24:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've asked in the On30 section, and become a little wiser, but need some more info.
I'm modeling Maine 1930ies, and since I live in Europe, I have little idea of how the connection from power poles/transformers to houses/small industries looked/worked. Researching photo databases has not revealed clear photos, so if anyone could has some closeup photos or would make a drawing, I'd be grateful! I want to get this looking right! And what about the telephone lines, while we're there?
Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4920

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  11:30:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kirk, picture #1 depicts the details found on a pole line. The uppermost wires are the power lines usually two or three lines are strung. 8 to 10 feet below is the telephone line. That goes into a splitter box, and sent to different houses.
The power lines are run to the homes to just under the eaves of each house. Then run down the outside of the house to a meter box. Then into the house panel box. The phone line comes from the pole box to the side of the wooden house and enters above the foundation. On brick homes the phone line enters through the wooden window outer frame usually on a second floor. I hope this helps.






Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 2000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 17122 Go to Top of Page

BBLmber
Fireman



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  11:43:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Troels, to add to my reply on the On30 lounge, the telephone lines would have been in a lead encased line in town areas, and in rural areas it would look like telegraph lines. Telephone wires always run in pairs when using single strand wires. The lead line would have multipal pairs inside with a smaller line running from it to a junction box on the pole. The junction box would be where the house service line would come from. The house line would be a two pair small cable that ran to the house then down to a small box about three feet above the bottom of the siding. I have drawn a quick scetch showing a general arrangement. hope this helps.

Mark



W,L,&E

Country: USA | Posts: 6443 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  11:53:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Right, Louis, the only thing I would add is that when the power lines attach to the house, they enter an upright piece of conduit (with what's called a "weatherhead" on the top), and the conduit extends down to the meter base. Sometimes (often) the conduit extends up through the edge of the roof.

The drawing you provided is excellent, simple and very clear. Do you have a drawing of three phase power, which would be used in more industrial or commercial settings, or even agricultural applications? A lot of what is modeled would have three phase power available, if one is to get that detailed.

Of course, stringing lines is another matter. On a diorama, there is no problem, but on an operating layout, where "five finger" help has to reach into the track area, well, there is the constant worry of snagging the lines. Using the stretchable material from Berkshire Jct is a good option. I've used it in one area of my layout. It is so fine, it almost disappears, hence, it is a good thing it is stretchable, as I've snagged it more than once. It has always bounced back to position, though.

The reason I'm going on and on about this is that I work (32 years) for a local electric utility and have long felt that I need to complete my modeling efforts down to the level of the power lines, both transmission and distribution lines, if for no other reason than to satisfy those fellow co-workers that come by and see the layout. They have inevitably asked about the power lines and substations. I have built one substation (modified the Walther's kit), and will install it once again on the rebuilt Tabooma County Railway (if I ever get there), and probably cautiously proceed down the path of installing power (and telephone) lines....

OK, off my platform and back into the railroad room....



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  12:02:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys for the very helpful info! A little confused still, but I'm sure I'll be able to make installations look more american now! Mark, you drawing is very clear, but I can't decipher where the third power wire origins on the pole/trafo?
And does anyone produce credible poles/trafo's in O scale?


Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4920 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  12:03:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tabooma County Rwy

Right, Louis, the only thing I would add is that when the power lines attach to the house, they enter an upright piece of conduit (with what's called a "weatherhead" on the top), and the conduit extends down to the meter base. Sometimes (often) the conduit extends up through the edge of the roof.

The drawing you provided is excellent, simple and very clear. Do you have a drawing of three phase power, which would be used in more industrial or commercial settings, or even agricultural applications? A lot of what is modeled would have three phase power available, if one is to get that detailed.

Of course, stringing lines is another matter. On a diorama, there is no problem, but on an operating layout, where "five finger" help has to reach into the track area, well, there is the constant worry of snagging the lines. Using the stretchable material from Berkshire Jct is a good option. I've used it in one area of my layout. It is so fine, it almost disappears, hence, it is a good thing it is stretchable, as I've snagged it more than once. It has always bounced back to position, though.

The reason I'm going on and on about this is that I work (32 years) for a local electric utility and have long felt that I need to complete my modeling efforts down to the level of the power lines, both transmission and distribution lines, if for no other reason than to satisfy those fellow co-workers that come by and see the layout. They have inevitably asked about the power lines and substations. I have built one substation (modified the Walther's kit), and will install it once again on the rebuilt Tabooma County Railway (if I ever get there), and probably cautiously proceed down the path of installing power (and telephone) lines....

OK, off my platform and back into the railroad room....


This "upright piece of conduit (with what's called a "weatherhead" on the top)" you refer to is only modern day information. He asked for 1930's power lines. They didn't even know about weatherheads.



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 2000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 17122 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  12:12:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kirk

Thanks guys for the very helpful info! A little confused still, but I'm sure I'll be able to make installations look more american now! Mark, you drawing is very clear, but I can't decipher where the third power wire origins on the pole/trafo?
And does anyone produce credible poles/trafo's in O scale?


Weaver Models has a nice O scale telephone pole. http://www.weavermodels.com/page102.html



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 2000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 17122 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  1:06:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for that link Louis! I'll order ASAP.

Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4920 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  1:27:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by desertdrover

quote:
Originally posted by Tabooma County Rwy

Right, Louis, the only thing I would add is that when the power lines attach to the house, they enter an upright piece of conduit (with what's called a "weatherhead" on the top), and the conduit extends down to the meter base. Sometimes (often) the conduit extends up through the edge of the roof.

The drawing you provided is excellent, simple and very clear. Do you have a drawing of three phase power, which would be used in more industrial or commercial settings, or even agricultural applications? A lot of what is modeled would have three phase power available, if one is to get that detailed.

Of course, stringing lines is another matter. On a diorama, there is no problem, but on an operating layout, where "five finger" help has to reach into the track area, well, there is the constant worry of snagging the lines. Using the stretchable material from Berkshire Jct is a good option. I've used it in one area of my layout. It is so fine, it almost disappears, hence, it is a good thing it is stretchable, as I've snagged it more than once. It has always bounced back to position, though.

The reason I'm going on and on about this is that I work (32 years) for a local electric utility and have long felt that I need to complete my modeling efforts down to the level of the power lines, both transmission and distribution lines, if for no other reason than to satisfy those fellow co-workers that come by and see the layout. They have inevitably asked about the power lines and substations. I have built one substation (modified the Walther's kit), and will install it once again on the rebuilt Tabooma County Railway (if I ever get there), and probably cautiously proceed down the path of installing power (and telephone) lines....

OK, off my platform and back into the railroad room....


This "upright piece of conduit (with what's called a "weatherhead" on the top)" you refer to is only modern day information. He asked for 1930's power lines. They didn't even know about weatherheads.



Ahh, missed that 1930's reference - sorry for the confusion! I'll go away now......



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  3:37:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tabooma County Rwy


Ahh, missed that 1930's reference - sorry for the confusion! I'll go away now......


That's ok, I'm guessing he's got the idea now.



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 2000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 17122 Go to Top of Page

LaRueD
Crew Chief



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  4:22:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
May I also add my Thanks!

Heretofore, I had questions about period (± 1930s) electric supply systems and wiring. I was aware of the "weatherhead" but unaware that it wasn't employed until later years.

Best wishes,
Bästa lyckönskningar ...



Edited by - LaRueD on 10/11/2009 4:30:42 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 535 Go to Top of Page

BBLmber
Fireman



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  4:53:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Troels, it's been a few years since I have been up on a pole so my memorey isn't clear. The transformer either has a lug for two wires or both of the top two are under the same lug. The bottom wire of the three is the nutrel wire and doesn' hook to the transformer.

Mark


W,L,&E

Country: USA | Posts: 6443 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 10/11/2009 :  5:12:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Troels, you asked on the On30 lounge thread if each house had its own meter. Yes, as in the pictures shown, a single meter is mounted to a single family house as in picture #1, and a three apartment house would have three meters as in picture #2.






Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 2000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 17122 Go to Top of Page

rf_king
New Hire

Posted - 10/12/2009 :  1:09:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Try a google search for RUS (Rural Utility Specifications). I used to have a handbook that showed the specs for power lines and service drops back when I was with a power company. You may be able to find drawings somewhere.


Country: USA | Posts: 18 Go to Top of Page

darrylhuffman
Crew Chief

Posted - 10/12/2009 :  7:02:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit darrylhuffman's Homepage  Reply with Quote



Troels,

Here is a simple drawing from an old Montgomery Ward booklet. The wire hanging down is a ground wire which goes to the ground.



Darryl Huffman
darrylhuffman@yahoo.com

Country: USA | Posts: 665 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/13/2009 :  11:20:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
With all these drawings, pictures and links, it's really a super thread, very informative. Thanks to all contributors.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic: Intertwining turn table Topic Next Topic: Hardwick & Woodbury Railroad  
 New Topic |   Reply to Topic | 
Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.41 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000