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NBandS
Section Hand

Premium Member


Posted - 11/24/2008 :  2:27:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frederic, for e.g. the planer and drill press, what does Christophe use for the drive belts?


Country: USA | Posts: 94 Go to Top of Page

JohnJ
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/24/2008 :  8:41:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frederic: This is amazing modeling. Thanks for sharing this with us.

John Johnson

"I'm right 98% of the time. Who cares about the other 3%."

Country: USA | Posts: 1245 Go to Top of Page

kay4pacific
Fireman



Posted - 11/24/2008 :  11:56:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frederic, All I can say is Double WOW. Chris i a master craftsman for sure. Museum quality work. This is one of the best posting I have seen on the forum. Thanks so much for sharing his work.


Country: USA | Posts: 4765 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/25/2008 :  6:20:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Many thanks to all of you for the comments.
I forwarded to Chris these, and told him again that some of you would be very glad to be able to purchase some of his models. I'll let you know what he tells me.
Bill, I'll tell you how he makes the belts when he tells me. My guess is that he uses brown paper with which some commercial envelopes are made.

This new installment concerns some heavy machinery : presses and drop forging.

One could find these kinds of machines in some machine shops, particularly in those equipped with a forge or a foundry. There was at least one such shop on the East Broad Top (I think in Strasburg, PA) where some replacing parts could be forged.

There are various kinds of drop forging hammers (sorry, I don't know the name of the tool ; in french, it is "marteau-pilon"). They are often actuated by a steam engine, can be automatic or manual, the hammer keeps on moving up and down, and the operator uses a lever or a pedal to allow it to hammer the work piece, which has been heated in a nearby forge or oven. The following video shows clearly the way this work is being done.

http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=xmS3LgfdT7E]http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=xmS3LgfdT7E

Here is a gallery of Chris's models :









The last one (below) is a monster made by KRUPP Dampfammer Fritz, the pressure range goes from several hundred kilos to 1000 tons.





There are also many sorts of presses. They are used for stamping and shaping, for instance in the car industry. The biggest one in Europe is in Issoire, a town in the center of France. It is used by Airbus (planes) and can apply a 10 000 tons pressure.

Here are a few presses modelled by Chris.










Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/25/2008 :  6:22:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A few more hints about Chris' modelling techniques.



First step : the base and sides of the drop forging hammer are made out of 10mm thick (about 0.4") plywood, cut with a multi scroll saw. Then this basis is covered with styrene. The piece is then sanded (Chris uses a fiberbrush to remove exceeding glue). When this is dry, he adds the other parts (cylinder, cylinder stand, sides, the hammer and its slide bars, the chest on the side of the cylinder). He finally adds the final, smaller details, levers, bolts, controls. It takes him 4 or 5 days to produce 5 drop forges like the one pictured on a sort of production line that allows him to save time.



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Chester
Fireman



Posted - 11/25/2008 :  6:47:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fabulous modeling, some of the best I've ever seen. Much luck to Chris in his business endeavor his talent deserves to be successful.

http://modelingin1-87.blogspot.com/

Country: | Posts: 2710 Go to Top of Page

railbuilderdhd
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/25/2008 :  9:08:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frederic,
Please tell Chris those larger models are better then the smaller ones but they are all great. I would like to know if you can ask Chris how does he make the all the gears and the motors on the top of the tools like the drill press. I just can't get over how great they look.
Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 358 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/26/2008 :  08:21:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One word "EXCELLENT"

Jerry


Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 12639 Go to Top of Page

CieloVistaRy
Fireman



Posted - 11/26/2008 :  8:05:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's beyond description, and if I may be forgiven for using a slang young people use: "it's sick." As in it provokes the same extreme reaction if something were to "sicken" you.

Arthur


Arthur

Country: USA | Posts: 5866 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/27/2008 :  06:25:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, the motors come from a French producer of marine models : CAP MAQUETTES. Here is a link to their site :
http://www.cap-maquettes.com/shopcap7_1/index1.html
Put the mouse on the letter M in the menu on top of the page and click on "Moteurs factices".
Chris knows someone who throws away lots of materials full of gears and he gets most of his there. He promised me a shot of his treasure (he's got thousands of gears).



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

railbuilderdhd
Engine Wiper



Posted - 12/01/2008 :  9:21:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Frederic those are great but they do not shop to usa. All I need to do now is find a place in usa that makes these.
Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 358 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/02/2008 :  6:17:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, tell me if you are able to find some. Otherwise, I'll see if I can buy some for you and send them.

I saw Christophe last weekend in Paris. Here are some great news : he and Peter McParlin, the owner of Backwoods Miniatures have agreed on the following : Chris will provide masters so as Pete can have them molded and manufactured under his company. While it is not a short term project (it will probably take more than one year since Chris is very busy), I think it's a great news that should satisfy many of you.



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

NBandS
Section Hand

Premium Member


Posted - 12/02/2008 :  8:44:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frederic, that's excellent news!


Country: USA | Posts: 94 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/04/2008 :  4:47:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The workshop


Let us start a new part of this topic, with a description of how all these machines can be put together to make a shop.

Christophe begins his description with some links to the work of outstanding modellers and manufacturers :

http://www.sierrawestscalemodels.com/oscale/machine.html

http://www.sierrawestscalemodels.com/oscale/mt/machine01.html

Then he gives some examples of real shops













and he mentions that his favorite model is Chuck Doan's





He explains that he always keeps everything (small bits of styrene left over after assembling a kit for instance) in order to feed the "junk source" (pipes, metal profiles, drums, plates). He also suggests Berkshire Valley

http://www.berkshirevalleyinc.com

as a great source for these as well as for other tools such as vices, compressors, trash bins, ...

To weather it, he mostly relies upon pastels to simulate grime, dust and rust. He also uses Polly Scale oily black to give a greasy look to parts or to simulate stains on the floor or the workbenches. To make greasy rags, he tears apart some Kleenex, dips it in white glue after painting it with dirty colors and puts in on the side of a bench. He suggests to not forget calendars on the walls or the doors of the lockers.









On the last pic, the lathe actually works (there's a small slow motor inside). To make the shavings, he uses an electric file on a plate of metal and gathers the thin metal dust. The electric saw in the foreground was built starting with a disposable razor protection. The blade was made with a broken handsaw blade. And the mechanism actuating the plate of the mill comes from a milometer found in a car scrap yard.

Here is a work shop he built for one of his customers.









Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/06/2008 :  04:55:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Before starting the description of Christophe's current huge project, a few images of a relatively modern small sawmill he also scratchbuilt.
















Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page
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