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Author Previous Topic: Electro Critters Topic Next Topic: Forney coupling issues.
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Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/08/2008 :  4:51:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I wish to build a stub turnout. I know many others have built or thought of building some.
Perhaps you can share the "How to Build... " with us.

Here is one link I found:

http://modelrailroading.googlepages.com/stubswitches

If you want to build a 1:1 scale:

www.dochemp.com/switch.html
Tom M.

Country: | Posts: 9572

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/08/2008 :  6:52:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frederick posted this for me so I'll share
it here:

" About stub turnouts : basically, a stub turnout is a point turnout without points...
This means that all the part of the turnout close to the frog is the same as in a point turnout. In particular you'll be able to use your fasttrack jigs to build it. The difference is that instead of having two moving points to send the train to the right direction, it is all the leading rail that moves. The following link will show you the plan of such a turnout : the moving part is in the bottom of the drawing (between lines A and B) and as you can see the remainder of the turnout looks very much like an ordinary one."
http://www.tpub.com/content/armytransportation/Tr06711/Tr067110037.htm
"The only "new" thing to learn to build such a turnout is how the make the moving tie. The page above presents a possibility. This other link gives a solution that may be easier to deal with."
http://narrowgauge.railfan.net/stub.html
"And maybe other members here have their own methods..."



Tom M.

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Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/11/2008 :  10:03:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My ME code 70 rail from Fast Tracks has been mailed.

I am still looking for help / comments on how to build those stub turnouts.

I may try on this afternoon using code 83 rail for practice / experiment.


Tom M.

Country: | Posts: 9572 Go to Top of Page

Bill Uffelman
Fireman

Posted - 10/11/2008 :  2:55:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Build lead and frog assembly same as for point turnout -- extend the lead rails so they will go past the place where stub will be cut. Lay in the running rails using gauges when the running rail and lead rail have a gap equal to the fat nub on the center of your HO NMRA track gauge that is the point where you will cut the lead rail.

IMHO the best throw bar for the moving stub rails is gapped PC board with a slice of an appropriate sized rail jiner to allow the stub rail to pivot a little. The moving rail should be spiked about 2.5" to 3" from the gap - -same as 10' or 12' points in 1/4" scale. as guard rails like point type turnout.

To limit throw solder a piece of .015 wire to the outside web of the running rails to catch the moving rails. To limit vertical movement on Code 70 solder a triangle of shim stock on the bottom of the moving rail so it bears against the bottom of the running and lead rails. Wiht Code 83 the shim stock can be fitted into the web of the rail leaving flange clearance.

Gap the frog and feed power as with any turnout.




Build a three-way stub switch
Model Railroader, April 2001 page 94
These space-savers were used on standard and narrow gauge railroads
( "DODGE, ANDREW", HANDLAY, SCRATCHBUILD, STUB, SWITCH, CONSTRUCTION, MR )

is very similar to the way I started building NG stubs 45 years ago using Dick Andrews articles in RMC and others in MR. In the 1970s the NMRA Bulletin ran useful articles

Anatomy Of A Stub Switch
NMRA Bulletin, September 1975 page 35
( "MECHLING, MOE", STUB, SWITCH, TRACK, BL )



Why Not A Stub Switch"
NMRA Bulletin, June 1976 page 22
( HANDLAY, "LITTLE, FRED", SCRATCHBUILD, STUB, SWITCH, TRACK, CONSTRUCTION, BL )



Stub Switches - Alive In 1977
NMRA Bulletin, February 1977 page 53
( "ORGIBET, JORGES", STUB, SWITCH, BL )



Let's Try A 3-Way Stub Switch
NMRA Bulletin, January 1978 page 38
( HANDLAY, "LITTLE, FRED", SCRATCHBUILD, STUB, SWITCH, TRACK, CONSTRUCTION, BL )

Bill Uffelman
Las Vegas NV




Country: USA | Posts: 1105 Go to Top of Page

Bill Uffelman
Fireman

Posted - 10/11/2008 :  2:59:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://www.lauriegreen.info/ and go to Building Turnouts for a good way to capture moving points/stubs -- the pin through the throw bar is the secret. I do not know of a railroad tha uses a moving tie as a throw bar but you get the idea.

Bill Uffelman
Las Vegas NV



Country: USA | Posts: 1105 Go to Top of Page

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/11/2008 :  6:59:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill and Frederick,

Thanks for the pointers. I have built the easy end (frog). Will tackle the stub tomorrow.


Tom M.

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emccamey
Crew Chief



Posted - 10/11/2008 :  10:29:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit emccamey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
There's a NMRA DATA sheet (about 23 pages) on Stub Turnout design and construction (authored by Moe Mechling). (On the INFO PAK CD).

Stubs have a different geometry than 'regular' (US AAR) turnouts. The frog is curved (not straight), gauging of rails is not symmetrical - the straight route is dead minimum, the diverging route has modest gauge widening. The frog flangeways are not symmetrical as well.

Calculated lead length and the moving point rails (preceding rails - not pointed) are different formulas. Just using a 'regular' turnout fixture and modifying for moving rails instead of points will not make a correct stub turnout. One can be constructed that way and will work well enough, it will be longer than a stub geometry, and does not match true stub geometry.

A lot depends on the prototypical accuracy you want to achieve. Stubs are very space conservative even at the same frog number with comparison to regular points turnouts. But the space savings is gained reliably with the altered geometry.

-ed-



Country: USA | Posts: 964 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/11/2008 :  10:50:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom,
Lurking to see what you do. I always wanted some stub turnouts.
Larry


My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Country: USA | Posts: 11419 Go to Top of Page

fsm1000
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/12/2008 :  06:35:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit fsm1000's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tom, wow thanks for the plug :D That is my website you linked to :D Thanks a lot :D

By the way i have torn down the old layout and starting a new one and hope to have videos of making stub switches in the future :D I also have a final run video if you wanna see it as well.

Thanks again Tom :D


My old website is still here though not much in activity. I hope you enjoy it anyhow :)
http://sites.google.com/site/fsm10002

Country: Canada | Posts: 299 Go to Top of Page

Bill Uffelman
Fireman

Posted - 10/12/2008 :  2:11:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Stubs have a different geometry than 'regular' (US AAR) turnouts. The frog is curved (not straight), gauging of rails is not symmetrical - the straight route is dead minimum, the diverging route has modest gauge widening. The frog flangeways are not symmetrical as well."

Very bold statement! If you look at prototype track coinstruction diagrams from RGS, D&RGW, EBT, etc you will find that your statement is not accurate. Statement is more correct for industrial tackage but not for stubs on "mainline" NG or SG railroads.

Bill Uffelman
Las Vegas NV



Country: USA | Posts: 1105 Go to Top of Page

quarryman
Fireman



Posted - 10/12/2008 :  10:34:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit quarryman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tom-

For what it's worth, a shot of a stub switch at the EBT shops




Though certainly not on the mainline, it does appear to be very short from "points" to frog.



Hope this helps. I enjoy handlaying turnouts, but there is much about the geometry of a successful, reliable switch that evades me. That is why I FasTracks!

Mark



Country: USA | Posts: 1193 Go to Top of Page

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/13/2008 :  10:22:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,

Thanks for the picture.

I have made enough progress that I'll take some pictures and post today. I used the fast track jig for the frog side. I'll give further explanation with the pictures.


Tom M.

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Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/13/2008 :  12:35:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Here is a couple of pictures of my code 83 ME rail - stub turnout (practice run).



The turnout needs to be fasten downed so the switch stand can be installed and made operational.



Some of the turnout can be made at the work bench, however to complete an install the remainder of the turnout has to be built in place.


Tom M.

Country: | Posts: 9572 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/13/2008 :  12:52:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom,
Looks great, I know this is practice but will the wheel flanges clear the gap between the diverging routes?
If you need to build a few more for practice, I know a good mining line that could use some of these.
Larry


My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Country: USA | Posts: 11419 Go to Top of Page

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/13/2008 :  1:11:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Larry,

I tested with a Bachmann wheel set (2 axle) and they ran through OK.

I am playing with a Caboose Industries 220S ground throw to see if I can get it to work
with the stub.


Tom M.

Country: | Posts: 9572 Go to Top of Page

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/13/2008 :  2:03:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,

Would you have a closer picture of the switch stand? Would you know how it works?


Tom M.

Country: | Posts: 9572 Go to Top of Page
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