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 On30 Sugar Cane Hauler in 1920's Haiti
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Author Previous Topic: Operation Dark Winter - HO scale micro layout Topic Next Topic: The Town
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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 11/23/2015 :  7:04:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tom, concrete blocks are available in HO scale so I would think they would be available in O as well. You'd only need them where the block shows.

Frank

Country: USA | Posts: 5858 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/23/2015 :  9:34:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

Tom, concrete blocks are available in HO scale so I would think they would be available in O as well. You'd only need them where the block shows.



Thanks Frank. I am also toying with using photos from the prototype to fill in the windows with the concrete brick pattern.

Doc Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 673 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/27/2015 :  5:16:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have been doing a little more work on the mini this nice long Thanksgiving weekend.

The St Paul's Chapel project continues to slowly evolve. I did use photos from the Internet to make the ornamental concrete windows for ventilation.



I think it does look pretty close to the prototype.



I realized that the trim pieces,doors and windows on the prototype were either poorly painted or not at all.



I am trying to replicate this look on the model.



Eventual weathering and dry brushing will also enhance this detail.

A rural parish in Haiti is lucky to collect $50 US a month from its Sunday collections. That is why the main church buildings and outlying chapels always appear unfinished or in need of repair.

Doc Tom



Edited by - Grabnet on 11/27/2015 5:21:23 PM

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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/28/2015 :  09:04:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's progressing nicely!


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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/28/2015 :  09:21:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like those windows.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16062 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/28/2015 :  11:54:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks fellas.

As the sugar train puffs through Leogoane Haiti the St Paul's Chapel can be seen rising in the distance in direct juxtaposition of the Rhum Distillery.



The front doors and framed air vents have been scratchbuilt.



A little more work on the side door as well.



Steel roofing material is being shipped in from the USA and a roof for the chapel is next.

thanks for looking. Doc Tom



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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/28/2015 :  9:10:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Chapel gets a roof.

Now for the tricky part.....blending the roof in to the scenery. Or, how to fool the eye in to thinking that something that isn't there is there.

Building a mini layout necessitates several tricks or slights of hand.One of which is using building fronts with some 3D texture with the rear of the building mostly gone and only suggested.

One trick I found is to bring trees and bushes up close to the back of the building.



From the usual vantage point you cannot tell that a good portion of the rear roof is missing.



Once the rear roof is blended in to the scenic elements the front part of the roof can be built up in the conventional way.





The problem is I have run out of corrugated metal roofing sheets and have to put the brakes on until a shipment arrives.

Thanks for looking and commenting.

Doc Tom



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/29/2015 :  08:45:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good!


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kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/02/2015 :  3:52:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Fantastic modelling as usual.

http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 12/05/2015 :  8:55:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was able to put a roof on St Paul's Chapel. I decided to age it fairly intensely to impart the primitive look in a very poor part of a poor country.



The colorful roof was also intended to draw the eye forward and away from the back where the structure blends in to the scenery.



After looking at these pictures I wondered if the roof was too rusty and decrepit??





Let me know what you all think.. I can always repaint in a light gray like the prototype pictures earlier.

Thanks. Doc Tom



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/06/2015 :  07:41:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Overall I like it but the front side of the roof looks out of scale (too coarse?). The metal on the back side and what you had before on the front side looks more like the pics of the real thing. Maybe tone down the color a bit?


Country: USA | Posts: 13185 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 12/06/2015 :  08:12:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tyson Rayles

Overall I like it but the front side of the roof looks out of scale (too coarse?). The metal on the back side and what you had before on the front side looks more like the pics of the real thing. Maybe tone down the color a bit?



Thanks for the feedback. I got the corrugated metal roof material off eBay and while it said "O scale" I think it really is large scale probably 1:20.3.

I also do not like the colors and this roof will be coming off.

The previous "finer" corrugated metal came from a modeler who is now deceased and I will need to look elsewhere.

Who do you guys use for true O scale corrugated metal?? Rusty Stumps maybe??

Thanks. Doc Tom



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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 12/06/2015 :  10:34:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I agree with Mike. The corrugations appear to be as large as barrel tiles. Now you might want to modify the roof material into tile?

Frank

Country: USA | Posts: 5858 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 12/06/2015 :  11:14:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

I agree with Mike. The corrugations appear to be as large as barrel tiles. Now you might want to modify the roof material into tile?



Thanks. Agree way too oversize.....what was I thinking??

That roof is coming off. Going to try and find more appropriate scaled corrugations.

Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 673 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 12/06/2015 :  9:42:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK so ROOFING plan A just did not work or look right so it was time for plan B.

Here is St Paul's Chapel with the correctly scaled corrugated metal.







Looks like they are just starting to cut cane. Sugar cane once cut deteriorates rapidly and that is why rail roads are needed to this day to get the cane to the mill quickly.



Doc Tom



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