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 On30 Sugar Cane Hauler in 1920's Haiti
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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/07/2015 :  5:06:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Today, I started some more modeling on my On30 mini layout of the 1920 Haitian Sugar Train.

I have been working on the rural Leogoane section. After the completion of the Rhum distillery I thought I should focus on a little more salvation than damnation.

My good friend Father Andre Augustin is the Pastor of a Parish with outlying Chapels in the area of Ranquitte Haiti. Here are some photos of the St Paul's Chapel in the Haitian hinterland.

It is a nice simple structure and I have been setting in the footprint of the model I will make of this Chapel with the selective compression I have used on all the structures of this small layout.

Thanks for looking. Doc Tom










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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/08/2015 :  2:08:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I started carving steps in the blue foam for the base of St Paul's Chapel.



In the past I have used spackling compound (acrylic) and joint compound to cover the foam and give a concrete look to the foam. Any other suggestions???

Doc Tom



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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 11/08/2015 :  3:11:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like a short step to salvation...but also, depending on wher eyou stand, also a short step the other way. Either way it will add another interesting prototype scene to the layout.


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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/08/2015 :  5:35:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Gill

Looks like a short step to salvation...but also, depending on wher eyou stand, also a short step the other way. Either way it will add another interesting prototype scene to the layout.



Yes, and when they are cooking Rhum next door the fumes will influence the people at the service at the chapel.

Doc Tom



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/08/2015 :  8:23:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's going to be interesting to see how your "selective compression" reduces the chapel to fit.

George



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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/09/2015 :  06:13:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

It's going to be interesting to see how your "selective compression" reduces the chapel to fit.

George



Yes, this is an extremely small area. Part of the fun with mini layouts is "shoehorning" multiple structures in a wee area.

Here is how I did it for the Church in Port au Prince on the other side of the layout.



Tom



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Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/09/2015 :  11:15:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom,

Thanks for sharing the photos. I need to do about 24" of building faces. The space ranges from 1" to 2" in depth. Nice to see your work and get some ideas.


Tom M.

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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/14/2015 :  8:57:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was able to complete the steps of St Paul's Chapel.

I used "Joint Compound" to cover the carved foam to look a little more like crudely poured concrete.







Next up will be to paint the foam stairs a light brown color as in the prototype photos above.

Thanks for looking. Doc Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 603 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/15/2015 :  7:05:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Taking cues from the prototype pictures earlier I proceeded to build up the interesting side steps to the St Paul's Chapel.



Then I proceeded to paint a light brown/yellow similar to the painted concrete in the photos.





This foundation will be planted in to the existing scenery next and then the Chapel itself will be constructed.

I found some Arttista figures of Catholic Priests and should be fun to juxtapose these good folks with the guys working in the Rhum Distillery next door.

Doc Tom



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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/22/2015 :  4:26:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have been able to do a little more work on the mini layout. The concrete foundation and stairs to St Paul's Chapel have been "planted" in the scenery.








The styrene structure is started and test fitted. Really compressing the structure to fit in the tight space.



I had to trim some of the jungle back to get the building nestled in place.



Tight clearances mean that when the sugar train rumbles by it is going to wake up anyone dozing at the sermon after a hard work week.



Thanks for looking. Doc Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 603 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/22/2015 :  6:13:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More styrene added to St Paul's Chapel. It is starting to get that mass effect common with O scale structures yet it is still fitted in a tiny space.





Hopefully the funky diagonal rear wall will disappear as roofs are placed and the scenery is blended in to the roof line of the model.



Thanks for looking. Doc Tom



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/23/2015 :  08:38:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mating the roof to the walls might be a tad tricky.


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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 11/23/2015 :  08:59:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tom, I would like to see the inlaid cross in the gable end. Was it made with glass blocks or tiles? It has that bit or poor rural charm.

And doing the roof might be more than a “tad” tricky. You might have to extend the back wall up to the cut-off roof.



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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 11/23/2015 :  11:40:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom, there aren't photos to how he did it show, but my son did something similar to a roof on a long freight house that ran at a shallow angle up against a flat backdrop. He did a bit of fiddling, but the final results look fine from any normal view.


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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/23/2015 :  3:31:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the input and feedback gents.

The cross and the windows are actually constructed of concrete blocks on their sides. This allows air to circulate and helps with the Haitian heat. The concrete blocks are made on site using a very crude mold.

Not much glass in structures in the rural Haitian countryside.....too expensive and tends to break in the annual hurricanes that roll over the island of Hispanola.

Making these open air windows and the cross will be a modeling challenge.

Also I will do my best to blend in the rear roof with the scenery. I did this a few times on the Port au Prince side of this mini layout. Squeezing O scale structures in to a 2'X3.5' layout has been a lot of fun.

Thanks again for looking and commenting. Doc Tom



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