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 On30 Sugar Cane Hauler in 1920's Haiti
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Author Previous Topic: Operation Dark Winter - HO scale micro layout Topic Next Topic: The Town
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Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/28/2015 :  7:01:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To continue with the build of the Rhum Distillery in the very rural section of my mini Haitian layout I scoured the Internet looking for a suitable cane press prototype to model. This layout is set in 1920 Haiti and electricity was non-existent in the rural countryside. It is still that way today for the most part.A small operation like the one I am modeling could have used a small gasoline engine to power the press but again not likely. They were imported and rarely sent to the hinterland. Besides gasoline in the Haitian mountains was usually not heard of in the 1920's. So that left human and animal power.

I found this hand powered cane press on the net and thought I would give it a try.



Here is my take using plastic bits, wooden dowel pieces and parts from the junk box.



I did up the wheels for the hand cranks in the Haitian national colors of red and blue like the prototype. If you look closely you can see the shiny handholds from thousands of hours of hand labor turning this beast.







Next I need some laborers cranking the press. I have not purchased 1:48 figures in quite a while (wrapped up in a now defunct Garden RR X5 years). Where do you all like to get figures?? Any chance you know of manufacturers making African or African-American figures?? Thanks for all help and leads.

Doc Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/28/2015 :  7:32:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Doc Tom,
The press is a great scratch build.
African figures are hard to come by in o scale. I think Lifelike made a few. I will go on a little hunt for you.



My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Edited by - BigLars on 09/28/2015 7:45:54 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 11420 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/28/2015 :  7:44:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BigLars

Doc Tom,
The press is a great scratch build.
African figures are hard to come by in o scale. I think Lifelike made a few. I will go on a little hunt for you.



Thanks BL.That will be a great help. I can also paint up anglo figures of workmen like I did in this scene years ago.



TOM



Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/28/2015 :  7:46:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some links for figures, not sure if they all still work:

Aardvark Aarts: http://www.aardvarkaarts.com/

Aspen Modeling: http://www.theaspenmodelingcompany.com/OScaleFigures.html

Figures in O: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18671

Fun & Games: http://www.scalefigures.com/

Source for figures?: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=13931

The 1/48 - 1/43 figure reference thread: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=28881

McKenzie Figures: http://www.creative-works.ca/mckenzie_figures

McKenzie Iron & Steel: http://mckenzieironandsteel.com/catalog/

Painting White Metal Figures: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=24334

PeopleScale.com: http://www.peoplescale.com/main.sc



My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Country: USA | Posts: 11420 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/28/2015 :  8:06:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BigLars

Some links for figures, not sure if they all still work:

Aardvark Aarts: http://www.aardvarkaarts.com/

Aspen Modeling: http://www.theaspenmodelingcompany.com/OScaleFigures.html

Figures in O: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18671

Fun & Games: http://www.scalefigures.com/

Source for figures?: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=13931

The 1/48 - 1/43 figure reference thread: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=28881

McKenzie Figures: http://www.creative-works.ca/mckenzie_figures

McKenzie Iron & Steel: http://mckenzieironandsteel.com/catalog/

Painting White Metal Figures: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=24334

PeopleScale.com: http://www.peoplescale.com/main.sc





These are great links Big Lars!! Thank you and they are bookmarked.

The guys down at the dock are looking forward to some new friends and co-workers too.



Doc Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 09/29/2015 :  07:20:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom, Your scratchbuilt cane press squeezes right into place in the scenery. Hope to see the workers cranking it soon.


Country: USA | Posts: 2750 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/29/2015 :  4:26:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,
I found some Artista figures of workmen sitting around. They looked pooped from cranking the press and I thought they would fit in well with this scene. I ordered them and a few more days hope to have them in place.

Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 10/03/2015 :  5:17:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is the prototype cane press I was trying to model on the mini layout.



A signature part of this press is the falling down shade canopy. I went ahead and built one of these over the cane press to protect the workers from the tropical sun.



The workers are pooped from hand cranking that press for hours. They would love some rest except that blasted train with the shrill whistle will not allow a nap.









I think the Leogane Rhum Distillery is about complete except for piles of fresh cut sugar cane placed at the press.

Will next move down the line a little to build up structures in the village and planting the sugar cane.

Thanks for looking. Doc Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

Tommatthews
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/03/2015 :  6:01:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Doc Tom,

Very interesting progress. I always enjoy the bright colors used by the locals.


Tom M.

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kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/04/2015 :  12:35:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hey Doc

It's taken me two weeks get through the complete thread. I found my self stuck for minutes at a time on each picture. So much detail to take in and a great story about a unique little railway. I shall now be following events as they happen and look forward to the upcoming posts.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/04/2015 :  06:06:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



Country: USA | Posts: 12987 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 10/04/2015 :  08:17:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you gents for the nice compliments.
Kumard,I am glad you enjoyed this rather lengthy thread. I was trying to model a unique prototype and my Haitian friends have always been aware of my RR modelling hobby and they frequently go out of their way to show me the remains of the sugar cane rail roads that ran on the island.

Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 10/04/2015 :  08:29:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Joey Ricard's posts here and at his very nice website and you tube site inspired me to try a little different photography.

He uses the iPhone frequently and gets some stunning results. I particularly liked his You Tube tutorial were he comments on how easy it is place "the trusty iPhone" actually on the layout and take pictures in places the digital camera could not go.

My wife got us in to the latest iPhones and their built in cameras are incredible.

The pictures of the cane press above were all done with the iPhone.

Here is a grab shot of a new Porter beginning the paint and weathering process for work on the rail road. It was taken with the iPhone in room lighting.




Here is a close up shot I tried of a fuel tender with a Porter "speeding by"



Overall I was impressed with the capabilities of these little cameras and feel it will become an increasingly utilized modeling tool.

Doc Tom



Edited by - Grabnet on 10/04/2015 08:31:47 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 10/04/2015 :  10:06:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tom, the workers village should be something to see!

Have you considered using twigs from the yard for lumber when you build small structures like the shade canopy or the ladder? It gives the items the look of being crudely made such as in the proto type canopy. I would assume they opted for natural supplies rather than “store bought” dimensional lumber.


Frank

Edited by - Frank Palmer on 10/04/2015 10:07:40 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 5492 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 10/04/2015 :  11:34:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

Tom, the workers village should be something to see!

Have you considered using twigs from the yard for lumber when you build small structures like the shade canopy or the ladder? It gives the items the look of being crudely made such as in the proto type canopy. I would assume they opted for natural supplies rather than “store bought” dimensional lumber.




Thanks Frank for the constructive feedback. Yes, even the lumber they do use in rural Haiti is hand sawn and very irregular. The posts on the little shade canopy and the ladder are way too uniform. I should replace them soon.

Here is what a 21st century house looks like in Haiti.



It is called a "wattle and thatch" technique with the roof wood members covered in mud or a cheap stucco like concoction. It is an African technique for house building and reaches back centuries.

I should try to do this with the upcoming build of the village.

Tom



Edited by - Grabnet on 10/04/2015 11:36:55 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page
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