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 Freelanced Hoboken waterfront mini in HO
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Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/03/2008 :  10:22:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Making waves with gloss medium is a lot easier than I thought!



then when they had dried I had



Though that is only the first coat. The waves are quite small and there is still some wood grain that can be seen. I'm thinking of adding a blue tinge to the sea as the black looks a bit dark. What do you think? From water level is looks ok but from above it looks unnatural.

I went mad and grew some grass on the land as well. The layout looks a lot more complete although it doesn't really look like an urban area yet.



Neil


Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

Country: Australia | Posts: 2501 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/03/2008 :  12:52:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The difference between the water level and the from above pictures is amazing, indeed, Neil. Couldn't it be that the lighting is too strong and direct in the from above shots? Is the difference as important in reality or is it more important in the photo?
In any case, I really like the water level one.
Concerning the grass, I think you've thought of it and plan to complete the work, but I think that one wouldn't find a nice green turf like this in an industrial area like the one you're depicting. I would add earth, other shades of green, debris of all sorts. But again, I guess you have some such ideas in your mind.



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/03/2008 :  7:06:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neil, you've made great progress. Your water looks great. I tried using gloss medium myself years ago on a project, but I had the problem of bubbles! I just couldn't get a coat of the stuff down without those pesky little bubbles showing up. Maybe I was doing something wrong. Did you have that problem?

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/03/2008 :  7:35:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Neil!


Country: USA | Posts: 12987 Go to Top of Page

Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/04/2008 :  3:51:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frederic, I totally agree with you. I'm planning to tint the grass to give it different shades and areas where there are spills. Bushes and junk will abound. The grass is down to give the ground a temporay finished appearance because I was curious about how it it would look. I expect most of it will eventually be covered.

I am going to be representing autumn 1936 - sortly before the election that FDR won in a landslide again Alf Landon on 3 November - so the ground is going to be wet and muddy.

The lighting is just the room lighting with natural light from the window. No flash. So the lighting of photos is a bit hit and miss

Mark, I didn't get many bubbles in the gloss medium. I noticed one wave peak that did but it was one of the highest peaks so I think it only happns when the gloss medium is too thickly applied.

Neil


Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

Country: Australia | Posts: 2501 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/04/2008 :  5:37:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neil,
I like the water and the work you have done to this point.

As for the water being too dark I think if it represents deep water then it would be dark.
Water is many different colors in nature depending on many things over which we as model railroaders do not have that much control.

Dave Frary mentioned that he has seen all the colors including Cerulean Blue.
Of course he is a lobster fisherman and spends a great deal of the time on the water when he is not modeling.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13313 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 10/04/2008 :  10:16:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like it very much Neil. George Sellios with his F&SM layout didn't like his water either, so he painted over it with more green tones. But I assume you are looking for the deeper waters, so yours should be fine being darker the way it is.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 2000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 17750 Go to Top of Page

RDG-LNE
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/08/2008 :  12:12:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit RDG-LNE's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One of the things that might help your water modeling is the hint that the quay extends below the water line by painting lightly some of the color along the line where the water and quay meet - like the effect some modelers use to suggest river banks. Right now, it looks like everything stops at the water line and the lack of transition is probably what is bothering you. Another reason you may be dissatisfied with your water is that it lacks depth. I grew up near the Hudson River (but not during the Depression) and the water along the docks was usually a brackish mix of oily browns, blacks and greens. I'd stay mainly black and just lightly mix in a little of brown and green here and there - just enough to hint at the brown and green - you don't want the checkerboard look. Otherwise, looks great.

Drew

P.S. Don't forget all the flotsam and stuff that floats around near docks like loose boards.



Country: | Posts: 262 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 11/08/2008 :  02:12:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking better and better! I often use a bluish Payne's Grey to tint water (try half black, half ultramarine blue, and a dash of naples yellow light to give it a green tinge and "milkiness").

Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4927 Go to Top of Page

Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 11/10/2008 :  12:23:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the suggestions and encouragement. The first hand experience of Drew is great. There are plenty of photos from the period but they are all black and white so don't convey the water colour well. I'll give it a try again soon. I think I'll use a blueish tint with greens and browns because I'd like to convey the reflections of the sky on the water. I haven't been updating because I've been doing electrical work and benchwork to the layout to satisfy some shortcomings but news is due soon

Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

Country: Australia | Posts: 2501 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/10/2008 :  12:51:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neil,
Regarding the water, I spoke to my grandfather before he passed away about his time working on ships in the 30's. One of the things I remember vividly was his comments on how polluted the dock areas were. He told me you could have walked across the top of the water in several US ports for all of the debris that was floating around. So you may want to junk up the water some.
Larry


My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Country: USA | Posts: 11420 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 11/10/2008 :  2:16:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is still pretty bad in some commercial harbors... in Belgium for instance. Typical is the oil stained pilings in the range of the tide. Your fenders and topside gets smeared with brown gunge. Nowadays the worst is all the plastic bags suspended in the water, just waiting to curl around your prop.

Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4927 Go to Top of Page

Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 11/13/2008 :  08:16:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BigLars

Neil,
Regarding the water, I spoke to my grandfather before he passed away about his time working on ships in the 30's. One of the things I remember vividly was his comments on how polluted the dock areas were. He told me you could have walked across the top of the water in several US ports for all of the debris that was floating around. So you may want to junk up the water some.
Larry



quote:
Originally posted by kirk

Typical is the oil stained pilings in the range of the tide. Your fenders and topside gets smeared with brown gunge.



That's really good information to have. I was planning on being quite frugal with the debris in the water but it sounds like there was plenty of waste washing around. Thanks


Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

Country: Australia | Posts: 2501 Go to Top of Page

Neil M
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/08/2008 :  09:26:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well it's been a while since I updated this thread with some modelling but I have not been totally idle.

I widened the layout by 4cm because the curvature in the siding at the front left of the layout was too tight for reliable coupling and uncoupling so I wanted it straightened out. Turnout linkages have been repaired as have the road and the surface of the sea. I think i've got it all to blend together fairly unnoticeably.



There is a modest start to my flotsam in the water. It's not painted or in the water yet but i'm liking the look of it.

The building at the front left will mask the transfer table and will be a brick three storey building but will use the roof lines of FOS scale Deckers Tar Soap. I love that kit but I need one that is longer, higher and made of brick!

I've been working to complete the road and level crossings



And I got a wee toy that I'm going to make look more typically US (it's a german prototype)



Thanks for looking
Neil


Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

Country: Australia | Posts: 2501 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/08/2008 :  6:43:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



Country: USA | Posts: 12987 Go to Top of Page
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