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Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 07/12/2008 :  8:42:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frederic Testard

I love the interior shots of your garage, Tony. I also like the fitting of the two roofs : great adjustment work. You'll really need some good lighting in the garage to keep this nice orange effect on your pictures.


orange effect, yes, hummmmm, how did I do that? Just a quirk of the camera color? Don't know, but it looks cool. I will have lighting in it though. Thanks for your comments.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 07/12/2008 :  10:40:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Nelson458

Originally I was planning on adding some shingles to the face of the tarpapered roof, but now I look at it, I like it like this.



If it was me (which it isnt) I would leave it as is, esp as you say you like it how it is.

If at some point in the future you change your mind and decide you want to over lay shingles then you can, it will be ALOT easier to add them later than to remove them now if you dont like them.

Personally I would move on to something else before rushing into a decision, sit and look , and then look some more, you will decide what is best, there is no rush.

Karl.A

EDIT oh I forgot to add, IF you do decide to leave it 'as is' I would put some additional weathering on that exposed subroof on the bottom right corner of the roof, a small detail but I think it would enhance an already great model.



Edited by - UKGuy on 07/12/2008 10:43:17 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6277 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 07/13/2008 :  05:48:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony
I find the look of your tarpapered roof quite nice, and as Karl said, I would keep it this way for a moment until I see if I'm still satisfied.
What puzzles me more is the roof over the machine shop. If I have understood the story behind your modelling, this is an active garage and these expensive machines are being used on a regular basis, so I doubt the manager would let rain fall on them. But maybe you have plans to cover this part and I'm just going one step too far.



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2008 :  07:16:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Karl and Frederic,
I think I agree with you, looks better as is, but I can wait a while like you say. The machine shop roof will have corrugated panels over the tarpaper. This is also partly due to the fact that I will have the boiler outside that area and want to protect the roof from any stray sparks. The machine shop does seem crouded, but I imagine if you were about 5/8" tall, it would look about right. We had an area at work about the same size with several large lathes in it for many years. Worked quite well until they wanted to use the area for something else. (maintenance storage)
Here is the very latest:

Oh, and yes, I think the idea of additional weathering is a good one. Thanks.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 07/13/2008 07:17:34 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/13/2008 :  08:33:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Toiny,
I agree that the roof looks fine as is.
If you ever decide to change it out to something different here is a roof that I frequently use for reference since it is one of my favorite roofs of all time.
It is from Darryl Huffnman's Alaska Packers and can be seen here.

http://www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/photo3.html

Darryl has used about every type of roofing material that can be found anywhere all on one roof.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13321 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2008 :  08:41:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
[quoteit is one of my favorite roofs of all time.
It is from Darryl Huffnman's Alaska Packers and can be seen here.

http://www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/photo3.html

Darryl has used about every type of roofing material that can be found anywhere all on one roof.
[/quote]

I know, I love this roof. Although, I think he has room for a few clay tiles and a little thatch (for the birds?). (just kidding Darryl, the roof is great).

I was thinking of adding some wooden battons to the top of mine, in a haphazard fashion as if to hold down some stubborn loose paper.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/13/2008 :  09:15:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
I forgot about the tiles and the thatch.

I think Darryl also used tin signs to patch the roof which are not that visible in the picture.
This is common in Alaska where everything is recycled rather than thrown away.

Here is another interesting roof.
This is a picture taken in the 1950's of a cabin that once housed gold miners.
Again they have a variety of materials used for the roof.
Not what you would find in a more civilized community but again typical where building materials are scarce.




John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13321 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 07/15/2008 :  8:35:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, I have decided on keeping the main roof just tar-papered. The machine shop roof has corrugated iron, heavily weathered, partly from rust, partly from all the smoke the boiler puts out. It was very hard to get good pictures of the actual color, but these darker shots show more of how the roof looks.








Tony Burgess


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 07/15/2008 :  11:01:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Tony the roof looks great, the corrugated next to the tar paper makes a great contrast but blends so very well and realistically. I also noticed the damaged sub roof in the corner which looks great and again on the back walls tarpapered roof, these small additional touches really make the model stand out, even if they are not conciously noticed by the casual viewer, they just look 'right'.
What 'scale' size are the two boards running over the back of the corrugated roof? they look to be 4"x12"s???, maybe its just the camera shot. The battons on the tarpaper roof look great.
Cant wait to see the diorama base get started.

Karl.A



Country: USA | Posts: 6277 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 07/16/2008 :  06:16:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by UKGuy

Tony the roof looks great, What 'scale' size are the two boards running over the back of the corrugated roof? they look to be 4"x12"s???, maybe its just the camera shot.
Karl.A


Thanks Karl, they are 2 x 12's. I tried out the 1-by's, but looked too flimsy for that area.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/16/2008 :  07:04:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,

I agree with Karl's comments on how well the corrugated roof blends in with the tar paper roof. I also have to say that I love the job you did with the brick walls on the machine shop.


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 32565 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 07/16/2008 :  3:58:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Tony,

I agree with Karl's comments on how well the corrugated roof blends in with the tar paper roof. I also have to say that I love the job you did with the brick walls on the machine shop.



Thank you Bruce. Kind of you to say. The roof turned out well in the end, I had a problem at first. I painted it a gray primer, let it dry, then used acrylics and powdered pigments to color it, it was a more brown color. Loked great, had all the rust color I wanted. To fix it, I sprayed with a matte finish, big mistake. The colors ran off like water on an oily surface. I wonder if I had sprayed with an acrylic primer it would have been differant. Either way, I decided to put them up and color or paint them in place. All I used was white elmers glue, and they held just fine.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Jerry M
Fireman



Posted - 07/16/2008 :  7:28:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You have a stronger constitution than I do I probably would have gone nuts and smashed it the rest of the way...you are to be congratulated! The rebuild looks great


Country: USA | Posts: 4055 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 07/16/2008 :  7:59:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jerry M

You have a stronger constitution than I do I probably would have gone nuts and smashed it the rest of the way...you are to be congratulated! The rebuild looks great


Thanks Jerry, I do tend to have a lot of patience. If something goes wrong, I first want to see if it is fixable, if it is, how can I improve and if not, what can I use out of it. If it wasn't fixable, I would have started all over again and used this one as a burned out building or something. Luckily I wasn't too far long in the model.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 07/18/2008 :  06:39:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice shots of the garage, Tony. I share Jerry's opinion. Had it been me, I would have least had put it away for a while. I have a good amount of patience, but in general it is reserved to "first times"...


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