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 Mike Chambers' Craftsman's Corner
 Distressing tools
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Author Previous Topic: Bar Mills 1 Kit Topic Next Topic: Misrepresented HO Trucks on E-bay
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rfmicro
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/28/2007 :  8:05:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a 1-foot steel brush and a small toothbrush size brass brush for distressing. The former is too large for HO obviously, and the latter leaves a brass patina on the wood. Granted I could use a A&I solution to go over and cover the brass patina, but I am ready to buy another tool - can't have too many as someone quoted.

What to buy that gives good results?

Regards,
Trent Mulkern
Mechanicsville, MD

Country: USA | Posts: 532

hminky
Crew Chief



Posted - 03/28/2007 :  8:25:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit hminky's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The one Micro Mark sells is really good. It has fine stainless steel bristles and they call it a DISTRESSER WEATHERING BRUSH item #82466. It will put fine grain on styrene.

Harold



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Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 03/28/2007 :  8:36:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hminky

The one Micro Mark sells is really good. It has fine stainless steel bristles and they call it a DISTRESSER WEATHERING BRUSH item #82466. It will put fine grain on styrene.

Harold



Yup, I've got one of these also and use it a lot. It is a great tool!



Country: USA | Posts: 4408 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/28/2007 :  8:36:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Trent,
I also use the brass brush and the A&I mix does take away the sheen.
My hardware store also sells a toothbrush size one with steel bristles that I also like.

I use a tool similar to the Micro Mark one but bought it from Michigan Toy Company



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13153 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/28/2007 :  9:51:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Home Depot go to the welding section (not the paint section) Lincoln Brushes steel they work just great. That was a tip from Brian Nolan and it does work.

Jerry


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 6426 Go to Top of Page

railmus
Fireman



Posted - 03/28/2007 :  9:58:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit railmus's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dollar stores around here sell a set of three toothbush sized brushes - one stainless steel, one brass and one plastic!

John Kanakos
CNJWS II, Custom Models- Design & Build
http://www.junctionwestsub.ca
NMRA #055691 CARM # 212

Country: Canada | Posts: 1791 Go to Top of Page

TrainClown
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  12:15:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was reading in the Quincy Salvage thread how they have a scratch pen. Sort of a little wire brush for making grain on scale wood. No chance of buying one of those around here, so I made my own version. Basically, Dremmel wire brushes glued into handles. Just drill a hole and set the tool with 5 Minute Epoxy.



I did some experiments with the different brushes before I made any handles and found they all have a different effect.



The small round one is most like the scratch pens that are sold. I understand that scratch pens have an adjustment on them that regulates the length of the brush. The best results are done with a shorter brush, making it more aggressive. I wrapped the lower part of my brush, the part closest to the feral, with brass wire to restrict the flexibility of the bristles and thus make it shorter. This works fine.

I wanted to distress the lumber a lot. I was using a small wire brush for this, but it was taking too long. Also, the wire brush didn't give me the detail in the grain around the knot holes I was after. I remember seeing the old trick of using an old razor saw dragged across a board to make grain details. So I came up with this idea of a tool using that basic technique.



Here is how it fits my hand. I made the handle this shape so I have maximum control in direction and pressure.



In this detail shot you can see it's only 1/4" wide. I just cut the end off my razor saw.



Seemed like a good idea so I made a smaller one for more detailed work.



As you can see here the tip is only 3/32" wide.



Here are some experiments with my new tool. I found out it can be aggressive and maybe to much English makes for a very rotten board, indeed.



Food for thought.

Christopher


Clowning around with trains.


Country: Canada | Posts: 1579 Go to Top of Page

rfmicro
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/29/2007 :  01:05:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Christopher,

Very nice ideas in deed. Simple, cheap and appears very effective. If you can get that sort of affect on styrene, then balsa or bass wood should be a snap. Thankyou for the neat ideas.

Regards,
Trent



Country: USA | Posts: 532 Go to Top of Page

TrainClown
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  01:42:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your most welcome, Trent.

By the way, those boards are cedar wood, not styrene. They were for my derelict depot model.

Here is a glimpse of what can be done with real wood. This model is HO scale. Yes, those are rusty nails. The knots in the boards were made by gluing tooth picks in to holes.




A broken chair. Long forgotten.


Glad to have helped.

Christopher


Clowning around with trains.


Country: Canada | Posts: 1579 Go to Top of Page

flatsguide
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/29/2007 :  02:43:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Christopher,

Thanks for the cool tool tips (Pun intended)...Nice work.

Regards, Richard



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lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  09:14:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I have been using a "file card"
Its a large brush, very stiff, used to clean files.
I like the fineness(real word) of the grain I am able to achieve with the card.
Since there are literally hundreds of bristiles my grain is much closer to scale.
I have all the other tools mentioned here as well.
-Marty



Country: USA | Posts: 1506 Go to Top of Page

hminky
Crew Chief



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  10:48:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit hminky's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here is my initial work with the MicroMark Distressing Tool:



An HO 1905 timber portal made from styrene primered with Kilz2 and stained with Jacquard black fabric paint and washes of sepia,burnt and raw sienna drafting ink.

It is the best "wood grainer" I have used. It does it quickly with great control.

Harold



Edited by - hminky on 03/29/2007 10:49:18 AM

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RichBeau
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  10:59:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit RichBeau's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm going to buck the trend with the MicroMark tool...I've had about three of them. Each one broke. The barrel is made of plastic while the tip end is metal. Apparently my heavy-handed fist has caused each one to break at the threads where these two parts meet. So if you're like me I needed an alternative. I found one over at 1st Place Hobbies that lasts a long time and does not tend to break... http://www.1stplacehobbies.com/cgi-bin/prod.asp?pn=230-916

-- Rich B.



Country: USA | Posts: 2487 Go to Top of Page

hminky
Crew Chief



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  11:22:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit hminky's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The Mascot tool looks like the Micro Mark brushes in a vinyl tube. Probably could make one from my spare brushes. Thanks for the link.

Harold



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DaveInTheHat
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  11:25:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit DaveInTheHat's Homepage  Reply with Quote

I use this brush a lot. It's for cleaning welds. I also use paper from a floor sander. I think its 20 grit.
Lots of other good ideas here. I use some Dremel wire brushes the same way, but I put them in a pinvise. The razor saw idea is pretty cool. I'm going to have to make one of them.


http://www.fotki.com/daveinthehat
http://www.youtube.com/user/daveinthehat/videos

Country: USA | Posts: 249 Go to Top of Page

Chester
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2007 :  11:41:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll take a jewelers saw and run it down the grain sideways to get really distressed and for a more subtle look I just use an 80 grit sandpaper. I use pine so when I finish it, I use a watered down acrylic for color. The water raises the grain on pine and it doesn't need a lot of distressing.



http://modelingin1-87.blogspot.com/

Country: | Posts: 2669 Go to Top of Page
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