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Author Previous Topic: Cutting sheet brass... Topic Next Topic: flattening out thin plywood?
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Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 04/08/2015 :  4:53:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote


Bruce, I'm with you. I've had this little jar holder for over ten years now, made by a good friend. I've never encountered a spill since...unless it's my tea cup sitting beside it!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Country: | Posts: 11492 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 04/08/2015 :  4:58:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote


This heavy duty cardboard tube acts as a great car cradle and has come in real handy many a time for me when working on the underbodies of freight cars.



The triangular shaped notch accomodates round cars such as tankcars.



As seen here. This tool frees both hands up to perform delicate underbody surgery or simply to screw on trucks or wheelsets.



The squared opening accomodates the roofwalks on older style boxcars.



The evidence speaks for itself...a must have tool in my books!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Edited by - Mike Hamer on 04/08/2015 5:00:57 PM

Country: | Posts: 11492 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/09/2015 :  02:17:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very clever use of humble objects, Mike.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/09/2015 :  09:27:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My carpenter brother got me a set of Forstner bits, that drill a flat-bottomed hole, one year for Christmas. I took some scraps of wood and made tool holders. The one in the back holds X-Acto knives, and you can see the C clamp on the left side that holds this in place. There's a little strip of magnet in the front to hold razor blades, etc. The wood dowels hold 'glue forks' made by snipping the end off the eye of a needle. I use these to apply CA glue.

I have a low speed battery operated screwdriver and these micro drill chucks (buy the ones from Micro-Mark, I've had bad luck with the generic versions.) I pre-load the most common size drills into them. This keeps the bits handy and makes it less likely I knock one onto the floor.

Just off the photo to the left, you can see paintbrushes that are stuck into a brush holder I got at an art supply store.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7654 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 04/11/2015 :  06:09:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Just getting interested in this thread. I saw the start of cutting mats on the second page, and thought I would share my thoughts on them. I bought several different kinds and did a personal evaluation on them. You can see it on my thread called "cutting mats":
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=34648&whichpage=2&SearchTerms=my


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3047 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 04/11/2015 :  06:27:03 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I try to buy quality tools when I can, the extra money spent always seems to well worth the cost. One tool company I have bought at least a 1/2 dozen from is Lindstrom. Specifically their cutters. They are now the only cutters I use. I bought most of mine off eBay, new, unused. They are usually sized for the size of wire to cut, and they have different cuts from totally flush, to leaving an angled cut. Some of mine are also angled flush cut, perfect for getting into very tight spaces. It is one I use a lot. A little expensive, but not overly so, especially for the quality.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3047 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 04/11/2015 :  06:35:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Forgot to add a few pictures;




Many of the cutters will show they type of cut to expect. These ultra flush cutters will leave a square edge on stripwood, great for trimming rafters in place for example.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3047 Go to Top of Page

engineerkyle
Fireman



Posted - 04/11/2015 :  10:23:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit engineerkyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote

I got a tool that I used for the first time.

As I build, scraps and trash pile up, getting in my way. DUH... I put a cardboard box at the foot of my workbench and every scrap goes straight in. Why didn't I think of this earlier? Now I can find stuff.

ek



Country: USA | Posts: 1050 Go to Top of Page

tloc
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/11/2015 :  11:32:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What a great topic--I have started from page one and the ideas are immense and practical. I now have JAR Holders for my paints and adhesives, built from on hand materials. I purchased for $4.00 a piece of 1/4" tempered safety glass for a flat surface 14.24" x 20.25" from a local glass shop. I have put together a piece of 1/4" x 16" x 24" steel plate $6.00 for keeping my buildings square during build up. Finally, I purchased some new nail clippers, not knowing that they come in straight cuts from the Dollar General store. Keep contributing, I have lots of buildings to build and my work bench has additional space to be used.



Country: USA | Posts: 2845 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 04/12/2015 :  08:47:19 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here's a tool I use quite a bit in both metal work and wood work on models.



The fret saw is great for cutting brass sheet that is .020" or thicker. Clamp the sheet between two boards and it will be easy to cut a large section of a 4" X 6" sheet.

That's how I did the square pieces for my R/C Athearn wreck crane.



For an explanation of a what a fret saw is or isn't follow this link. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fretsaw

When I get some time, like a rainy day, I'll do a little write up on using one and where to get the proper blades.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3114 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/13/2015 :  07:55:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This is excellent. Not only useful but just plain fun to read!

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/13/2015 :  08:00:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Hamer



Bruce, I'm with you. I've had this little jar holder for over ten years now, made by a good friend. I've never encountered a spill since...unless it's my tea cup sitting beside it!



I love the elegant touch - the molded edges. Rigs and jigs should be good looking as well as functional.

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/24/2015 :  4:25:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found this tool for cleaning paint brushes in the Sherwin Williams paint store.
The prongs are exactly spaced 1/8 th inch apart. This is perfect for scribeing bass and balsa wood.
in O scale. I formally used a dog groomers knot remover. It worked very well. But the brush scraper/cleaner
works even better. $4.59 And it is made very well.





Edited by - quartergauger48 on 04/24/2015 4:28:59 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5852 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 04/27/2015 :  6:23:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bernd, great idea on the fret saw. I have used one on my woodworking doing scroll work, I didn't connect the brass cutting capabilities to using this, now in the future, I should remember that when I need to cut brass. Thanks

Sometimes the simplest thing will hit you in the head with a big DAH! Keep them coming.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3047 Go to Top of Page

railmus
Fireman



Posted - 04/27/2015 :  7:02:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit railmus's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Re the fret saw:
Tim Warris (Fast Tracks) recommends them for cutting gaps in rail.



Country: Canada | Posts: 1968 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 6 Previous Topic: Cutting sheet brass... Topic Next Topic: flattening out thin plywood?  
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