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Author Previous Topic: Cutting sheet brass... Topic Next Topic: flattening out thin plywood?
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pulpyskipper
Section Hand



Posted - 02/21/2007 :  08:11:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit pulpyskipper's Homepage  Click to see pulpyskipper's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Stainless Top

I have a 2'by 3' stainless steel sheet, secured to a 3/4" plywood top that I assemble structure wall frames on. This top is installed on drawer tracks and slides under the bench top when I'm done using it. I have numerous 90 degree flatstock pieces secured to this top. I lay the wall sections against these angles and hold them in place with magnets until the glue dries. The glue does not stick to the stainless steel. I can glue up several wall sections at a time and slide the top out of the way until the wall sections are dry. All the wall sections come out perfectly square.

Carl
Cedarhill Designs



Country: | Posts: 78 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/21/2007 :  08:37:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Carl,

Where can you get a sheet of stainless steel like that?

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15160 Go to Top of Page

emccamey
Crew Chief



Posted - 02/21/2007 :  09:06:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit emccamey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

Carl,
Where can you get a sheet of stainless steel like that?
George



George - et. all.,

There's several cut to fit metal suppliers that regularly supply the live steam trade. One I've used and is fair, ships via UPS direct to the house, is http://www.metalexpress.net/

There are others - goggle metal suppliers. You will find metal suppliers in most large cities (or on the outskirts).



Country: USA | Posts: 964 Go to Top of Page

jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/21/2007 :  09:37:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by pulpyskipper

Stainless Top

I have a 2'by 3' stainless steel sheet, secured to a 3/4" plywood top that I assemble structure wall frames on. This top is installed on drawer tracks and slides under the bench top when I'm done using it. I have numerous 90 degree flatstock pieces secured to this top. I lay the wall sections against these angles and hold them in place with magnets until the glue dries. The glue does not stick to the stainless steel. I can glue up several wall sections at a time and slide the top out of the way until the wall sections are dry. All the wall sections come out perfectly square.

Carl
Cedarhill Designs



Carl,

what grade of stainless are you using? Most SST isn't magnetic. I know 300 series isn't.

Joe <><



Edited by - jatravia on 02/21/2007 09:38:23 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2831 Go to Top of Page

railmus
Fireman



Posted - 02/21/2007 :  11:33:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit railmus's Homepage  Reply with Quote
"I have numerous 90 degree flatstock pieces secured to this top"

Carl:
How do you secure the stock to the stainless steel? Would a sheet of glass not be just as efficient?



Country: Canada | Posts: 1968 Go to Top of Page

pulpyskipper
Section Hand



Posted - 02/21/2007 :  12:27:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit pulpyskipper's Homepage  Click to see pulpyskipper's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Guys,

The stainless steel top that I have is an old sink tray from a resturant kitchen that I remodeled years ago. It is pretty heavy material and was difficult to drill holes in. The metal 90 degree flatstock is 1/8" thick, extends both directions 6 inches and is an inch wide. It comes with holes already in it. You probably have seen these brackets in the hardware stores. They come in alot of different sizes. I used recessed machine screws and nuts to attach them to the stainless pan. I have six of them attached to the pan, so I can do six walls at a time. I bought a couple of bags of small round magnets at Lowes to use on the pan.

Carl



Country: | Posts: 78 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2012 :  5:08:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don't you just love it when an old thread resurfaces?

I didn't know where to post this, so I figured here was as good a place as any.

Having knocked over numerous little paint bottles and glue bottles over the years, I have used a variety of wood blocks with holes drilled in them with a spade bit to keep it from happening again. However, I haven't ever made a 'nice' one before.

Since I was doing some wood work with 5/4" pine and had the table saw out, the drill press out, and had borrowed my dad's Forstner Bits, I finally made a decent paint/glue bottle holder.



The three different size holes are 1 & 3/8" (good for the small bottles); 1 & 1/2" (good for standard size PolyScale/Floquil/Testors Cement); and 1 & 5/8" (good for Plastic Weld, etc.) The 5/4" board gives enough depth to hold the bottles better than a 3/4" board.



Country: USA | Posts: 31220 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2012 :  6:08:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
good job Bruce. I need to make one of those.


Country: USA | Posts: 6684 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2012 :  6:34:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Neatly done, Bruce. I especially like the beveled ends - very nice. "Done in a good and workmanlike manner" as the old contracts used to say.

Now I have to read this whole thread.

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

gregnarrowgauge
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/01/2012 :  8:21:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The rule with files is that you use your new files on your softest materials, then your older ones on your harder ones. A file which is too blunt to cut brass well is still sharp enough to cut steel. Materials like Plaster and hydrocal are tougher on files than materials like styrene, because the internal structure is more irregular. While this rule implies that you can "manage" your cutting tools (which is what a file actually is), if you have two files try painting the handles red and green and keep them for specific materials. You can change the paint colours when the file wears and get twice the use from them with a bit of judicious use. How do I know this...? I'm an old style machinist/fitter with thirty years experience cutting all sorts of materials with hand and machine tools.....Hope what I have to say is of some use to you. Greg.


Country: Australia | Posts: 194 Go to Top of Page

anubis51
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2012 :  10:33:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all,

Nice to read this thread and the tools that we all use.

One of the more "mundane" tools that I seem to use with a fair amount of regularity is the humble toe nail clipper. I have found that they are indispensable for fine trimming and nibbling, with a sharp, clean cut, right up to the line, on paper, card, styrene, wood, and some light metals too. Maximum material thickness is about 2.5mm to 3mm, or the thickness of the jaw openings.

They are cheap to purchase (all mine were about $2 to $2-50 each) although you can spend upwards of $10 for the "named" brands.

I have found that the radii of the curved ones varies, and these are good for trimming curved shapes, but I fell over a pair of 'straight' ones the other week at my local Two-Dollar Shop.

These really are a boon!


















I painted the lever-handle of the straight ones with Clear Red so as to be able to differentiate them quickly from the others, in my messy toolbox.

Anything to make my 1:48 modelling easier!


John





Time is the Gauge of Existence

Country: Australia | Posts: 1349 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/02/2012 :  1:18:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John, you're lucky to find those straight edges nail clippers. I've never been able to locate one here.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2015 :  2:29:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I was contemplating whether to restart this thread after reading the post of members wanting a separate forum for tooling. Bruce suggested this one in his post. I took a look and perhaps this is the way to go.

Bernd

Note: Edited do to a change of mind. Need to readdress how I approach this.



Edited by - Bernd on 03/30/2015 03:12:49 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3114 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/29/2015 :  5:28:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice array of metal works machines. Quite impressive'...What is your list of
wood working equipment consist of Bernd?



Country: USA | Posts: 5852 Go to Top of Page

engineerkyle
Fireman



Posted - 04/08/2015 :  2:26:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit engineerkyle's Homepage  Reply with Quote
this will be a valuable thread. It makes me realize I use NO good tools.

So I bought a little square and a framing clamp for corners. Still...



ek



Edited by - engineerkyle on 04/08/2015 8:24:33 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1050 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 6 Previous Topic: Cutting sheet brass... Topic Next Topic: flattening out thin plywood?  
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