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Author Previous Topic: Downtown Deco in the Wall Street Journal. Topic Next Topic: Kanawha Creek Railroad Supply  

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 12/23/2006 :  12:09:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I know, its my first post here and I'm already asking for something....

Could someone explain to me how I should match the shingles where my two roofs meet as I've never done this before. Here is my project.






Should I cut the shingles to match the roof line or add some 'flashing' down the joint? also would metal flashing have been used along the ridgeline?

Being originally from the UK I am unfamiliar with this roofing type.

Thanks for any and all help posted.

Karl.

Thank you for the two answers I had recieved, luckily I had read them before Mr Bagley decided to delete my very first post here (ya think he's tryin to tell me something??)

Country: USA | Posts: 6276

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2006 :  12:18:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Karl,
I am so sorry to have deleted your first post on the forum.
I should stay away from the computer this late in the evening.

I think we both in our replies said basically the same thing that the flashing basically runs in the valley between the roofs and the shingles run up to the flashing but there is a small gap to show the flashing.
Depending on the material used for the flashing you could color it greenish to represent copper that has oxidized or rusty if were a metal that could have rusted or just plain silver if it was representing a new roof.

Your ridge cap looks fine as is.

Thanks for understanding my goof and I hope to see you posting more of your work in the future.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13313 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2006 :  06:30:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Karl, I wish I had a better picture, but here is how I did the shingles on a station I built.



I wanted to add flashing to mine, but found out too late that the flashing goes on first and the shingles go over the flashing.

I'm sure it may have been done, but usually the ridge cap is not metal flashing. The way you have done it looks right.



Country: USA | Posts: 23096 Go to Top of Page

csantore
Section Hand

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  07:55:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Karl, another way that shingles are put on is to weave each course together as you go up. However, I do not think this will work in your case because you have already shingled the main roof. Benefit of this, is there is no flashing to worry about and it has somewhat of a cleaner look. Downside, it tends to use more shingles and it takes a little practice to get it right. If I figure out how to upload pictures, I'll try to put my whistlestop up.

Charles



Country: USA | Posts: 75 Go to Top of Page

stripes
Section Hand

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  08:38:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit stripes's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I would trim the shingles in the valley and add a small stip of alluminum foil to represent the flashing. Then shingle the rest of your roof keeping the courses lined up.


Country: Canada | Posts: 59 Go to Top of Page

Jim Mooney
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  09:49:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
yep, yep, and yep...that's how I'd do it...For flashing I use paper. Fold a piece of paper and crease it sharply (roll a pencil down it). Cut the folded paper about 1/32 wide...unfold (open it up) and paint with some NYC jade green....when you weather roof it will darken up...
Sometimes to cap a roof I use the same method, except I use a pounce wheels to emboss "nails". Do this from the backside and they will "stick up". Paint with grimy black and some rust.
BTW very nice job on the station! Send some pics to Art when your done so he can post them on the Bar Mills site.



Country: USA | Posts: 656 Go to Top of Page

postalkarl
Fireman



Posted - 12/23/2006 :  11:06:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Karl:

Your doing it the hard way. It is much easier to shinlge your roof while it is flat in front of you. If you start the courses at the bottom at the same point things usually work out pretty well. I would shingle the main roof and glue it on. Actually I can't tell which roof goes into the other to form the valley. Whichever one that is is the last roof or roofs you ant to install. On that roof leave the shingles about 1/16 of an inch to long. When that roof is installed the shingles will bend and create a nice neat valley. Try it it really works well.

Karl S



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UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 12/23/2006 :  11:26:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for all the great advice everyone, I'm going to have a bash at it later today, probably with some flashing in the valley.

Karl that is the way I was going to do it, but with the shingles supposedly being cedar I didnt think it would be right to bend them around the valley like the asphalt ones do.

I'll post a pic later if i get it done.
Karl.



Country: USA | Posts: 6276 Go to Top of Page

Quinn222
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  1:42:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by postalkarl
Your doing it the hard way. It is much easier to shinlge your roof while it is flat in front of you.



I read this just in time. I was about to do a roof just the way he has. Off to shingle my (flat) roof. Thanks!



Country: USA | Posts: 1139 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 12/23/2006 :  6:03:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Well thanks to the good advice I got the job done, I was unsure about the coppery green at first, but it is really growing on me. I went online , searched for copper-oxide grabbed a few pics and photoshopped them till I was happy and printed them out, cut to size and viola ....




I know the shingles dont look too hot yet, esp under the spotlight from 6", but theres time.

When the roof was done I grabbed some LP's stuck a light in there, threw some dirt and other details next to my only section of track and snapped these shots.







Thanks again, turned out great IMO, now I need to find some pics of shingles and practise them.

Karl.



Edited by - UKGuy on 12/23/2006 6:09:30 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6276 Go to Top of Page

mikethetrainman
Fireman



Posted - 12/23/2006 :  6:22:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Karl very nice looking station. Nice job with the shingles.The flashing looks good.

Mike Mace
Northern Division of the Santa Fe

Country: USA | Posts: 1695 Go to Top of Page

grlakeslogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/28/2006 :  01:01:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Karl. When I built mine, I used .002" Shim Copper to simulate flashing. I cut a strip of it wider than needed and used a metal straightedge to start a bend. It is important to get a straight crease started. Then I trimmed parallel to the crease about a scale foot to each side with a large scissors. Next, bend exactly to fit, trim, and glue down. Some old flashing turned green. Some turned brown. Some (galvanized) darkened to a near black (oxide) I believe. You can view a pic of mine in a division NMRA contest at http://www.wisedivision.org/library/200503/contest.htm
The model took 1st Place Structures, Best of Show that day, and earned 103 points in NMRA Achievement program judging (which sort of surprised me, it being a small structure). In any event, I painted my flashing with Floquil Rail Brown after gluing down. Then I applied shingles. The shingles were colored with a number of wood stains before application.
I hope you enjoy building yours as much as I enjoyed building mine. Oh, the large wood strips glued beneath the platform are to keep the wires from being crushed under the platform bottom. They are just spacers.
--Stu--


--Stu--
It's a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

Country: USA | Posts: 870 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/28/2006 :  07:34:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Stu & Karl, very nice jobs on this model.

When I built mine, I made the roof removable, and detailed the interior. The interior siding and trim is stained siding, and the detail items are from a variety of sources.






Country: USA | Posts: 31496 Go to Top of Page

grlakeslogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/28/2006 :  08:46:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great interior, Bruce. I detailed mine too. I don't have a digital camera, so I can't shoot pics for posting. I think our respective station agents use the same Desk (SS LTD?) and one of our passengers travels with the same trunk! I painted my walls Floquil Antique White and cut interior wainscoting from 1/32 scribed sheathing and window moldings from Kappler 1 x 3. Both were stained cherry with an ordinary (hardware store) wood stain. One neat coincidence was that this cherry stain is about the same color as Floquil Boxcar Red paint, so touchup of cut ends, etc. was a breeze. I did wall the baggage room off separately and added a door to it. Flooring was Kappler 1 x 6 stained English Oak (a varnished, slightly yellow look).

Where did you get those COOL benches?
--Stu--


--Stu--
It's a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

Country: USA | Posts: 870 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/28/2006 :  11:28:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Stu,

The benches are also from SS Ltd. Here is a link: http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/650-2148



Country: USA | Posts: 31496 Go to Top of Page
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