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Author Previous Topic: How to weather HO scale slate shingles Topic Next Topic: Old Gas Stations
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railphotog
Fireman



Posted - 02/01/2007 :  9:03:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit railphotog's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Steve: Thanks for the info on the lighthouse. I have a bit more than a passing interest, having retired from the Canadian Coast Guard six years ago. I've visited and have been a part of the maintenance (technical work, not carpentry) of 100 plus year old structures. I've always been facinated with the fine wood construction they had. One particular lighthouse had spruce "knees" - corner brackets really, carved out of solid chunks of deformed trees. All pinned together with wood pins, no spikes or nails. Still standing too!

Good luck!



Bob Boudreau
My model railroad photography website:
http://sites.google.com/site/railphotog/

Country: Canada | Posts: 4027 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/02/2007 :  9:00:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just a quick update.
I have been painting castings and trying different locations for them.
Still many more to paint by the end of February.
They still need some ageing and also there is more fence which will enclose the back area and has to be painted.







John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13313 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/02/2007 :  9:07:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good John, real nice collection of "junk" you have there!


Country: USA | Posts: 12986 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 02/02/2007 :  10:22:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's all in the details John You've been busy.


Me too...





In memory of Mike Chambers

Country: USA | Posts: 2972 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/02/2007 :  11:00:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken,
Yes you have and it is coming together very nicely.

Is that a dog in the lower right of the first picture.
I need to get me a junk yard dog to protect all my valuable junk.

Have you found a solution for the removable roof and interior lights for the garage?



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13313 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 02/02/2007 :  11:42:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a couple of idea's for the lights John. I'll save that for last.

Got a couple of funky gas pumps that I'm working on. Came with the kit...really bad castings


In memory of Mike Chambers

Country: USA | Posts: 2972 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 02/02/2007 :  11:51:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Excellent detail work John & Ken, I will need to start collecting some detail parts for these projects, a few barrels and a skid here and there just aint gonna cut it.

Here's a close up of the "painted" on sign on the siding of my new structure.



I think I'm gonna like this scratchbuilding... lots of experimenting to do

I'm off to go experiment with "peeling paint" for a different structure.

Keep up the great work.
Karl.



Country: USA | Posts: 6276 Go to Top of Page

essodee
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2007 :  08:44:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John, I really like all that clutter. Looks like they handle just about anything at that garage: a defunct loco?, old containers, is that tank treads? lotta stuff there. It all loooks quite at home. May well be a rival to Quincy Salvage.

Ken, Great work on that diorama. That side view with the funky roof atop the shed is so well done. Ditto, the old Model Ford up on the lift.

Karl (UK), That's a real nice close up shot of the sign, boarding and nail detail. Is that dry transfer lettering on the sign?

Stevie O'D



Country: USA | Posts: 1561 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2007 :  1:27:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Karl (UK), That's a real nice close up shot of the sign, boarding and nail detail. Is that dry transfer lettering on the sign?
Stevie O'D



Stevie its actually printed on the siding using my inkjet. I use 1/64 plywood. First I whitewash the ply with 2 coats of very thin white (this is the base for my final colour, you can use whichever colour necessary) I use a 4"x6" piece of ply. put the ply into the printer with the grain orientated so that it will curl around the rollers in the printer. In the graphics software set the image so it will print to the correct orientation for the grain in the wood (I usuall make several trials on paper till I have it right , then use the wood). Print out.

I trim the ply to roughly the size I need then cut it into strips for the siding. Then I individually grain, stain and weather each strip.

Once weathering is dry rebuild the sign over the subwall or frame.

It took a few trys to get the sign right through the printer, the 'bad' prints can be used as subwalls or reversed and used as plain siding elsewhere, no wastage.




This method has many posibilities for 'painted' on signs on buildings and fences. To fade the sign sand the lettering before cutting up and weathering.

You could even print the paint colour on the entire wall behind the sign, already weathered and faded in photoshop(or similar), or print a photo of an actual wall onto the ply and then cut it down into the individual boards and distress them and reassemble......

Regards,
Karl.



Country: USA | Posts: 6276 Go to Top of Page

PortEmerson
Engine Wiper



Posted - 02/03/2007 :  4:35:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Karl! That signage is terrific--Great job!

Joe

Country: | Posts: 215 Go to Top of Page

essodee
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2007 :  6:43:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Karl (UK), absolutely astounding concept you've come up with. And thanks for that pictorial explanation.

I never in my wildest dreams would think you could get something like plywood, even something as thin as 1/64", through the rollers of a printer. And 1/64" plywood, has to live up to its plywood name, by being a sandwich of even thinner veneers.

Your subsequent process, of then cutting it out into individual boards, working each one, and then reassembling atop cardstock underwalls, is really ingeneous.

I have been stymied in my thinking by the limitations that printer rollers put on what you can successfully bend around them. One idea, that I haven't tried, and which may also be suitable for you, is to have the printing done on a Xerox type copier, that prints flat, without bending anything.

I would like to make cardstock templates from a CAD program, print them out, and do what the laser cutter does, only by hand with a straight edge and #11 xacto knife.

I can tell from your great results above, and also from your comments, that your mind is churning with other possibilities. I say you're definitely on the right track, go for it, and keep us posted.

Thanks again.

Stevie O'D



Country: USA | Posts: 1561 Go to Top of Page

Quinn222
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/03/2007 :  6:52:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great idea! One other thing to check is if your printer has a flat feed. Some HP printers do. You'll find a slot on the back of the printer for feeding thicker materials through.


Country: USA | Posts: 1139 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2007 :  7:19:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Karl,
Absolutely stunning work.
We had another thread a few years ago about using the printer to paint signs on wood but you have taken it a giant step forward by by actually cutting the strips and applying them over a subbase.
That is as nice a sign on the structure as I have ever seen.

I think you might have this scratch building technique down pat.

Christina,
I have an HP printer but unfortunately no slot on the back to run the wood through straight.




John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13313 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2007 :  7:56:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



Country: USA | Posts: 12986 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2007 :  8:52:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the positive replies sure is a boost to keep on going. Hope its useful to someone else. I have a few ideas I'll be trying later.

Regards
Karl.



Country: USA | Posts: 6276 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 35 Previous Topic: How to weather HO scale slate shingles Topic Next Topic: Old Gas Stations  
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