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 Multi-deck layouts
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Author Previous Topic: Maximum grade on a switchback Topic Next Topic: Need help planning 0n30 layout  

dsteele
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/18/2005 :  08:18:13 AM  Show Profile
In considering a two-deck layout (or multi-decks, for that matter) is there a convention or standard or protocol for interconnecting the decks? That is, are they completely isolated from one another with trains remaining exclusively on their "own" deck? Is it "permissible" to have trains run from one deck to another and back?

Is there a standard in the hobby for this? Does the NMRA address this?

Thanks!

Dennis

Country: USA | Posts: 400

Cigarguy
Fireman



Posted - 09/18/2005 :  08:23:43 AM  Show Profile
INteresting. I would think that you could do it anyway that you wanted. If you kept them seperate, then it would be like having 2 different layouts. If they were connected (via helix, switchbacks, interchange tracks, etc.) then you would essentially double the size of your layout.

I don't know if the NMRA has any particular standards for this or not.


Mike
D&B Lumber Co.
"The Best Wood You Ever Saw!"

Country: USA | Posts: 3895 Go to Top of Page

Cigarguy
Fireman



Posted - 09/18/2005 :  08:23:43 AM  Show Profile
INteresting. I would think that you could do it anyway that you wanted. If you kept them seperate, then it would be like having 2 different layouts. If they were connected (via helix, switchbacks, interchange tracks, etc.) then you would essentially double the size of your layout.

I don't know if the NMRA has any particular standards for this or not.


Mike
D&B Lumber Co.
"The Best Wood You Ever Saw!"

Country: USA | Posts: 3895 Go to Top of Page

RichBeau
Fireman



Posted - 09/18/2005 :  09:00:04 AM  Show Profile
No Dennis, there's really no standard but there are a lot of considerations and it all depends on what you're modeling.

I've seen a number of double deckers and a couple of triple deckers. They seem to use three basic ways to get up and down. The most popular lately is the hidden helix. This permits mainline routes to ascend quickly and in minimum space. You can also ramp exposed trackage upward usually with a grade at something like 4% or less. Most times I've seen this there's helper service available. Usually there's some very cool modeling of the helper facilities. I've also seen on logging layouts a switchback or cable system to take cars up some very steep inclines (8%-9%).

--Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2748 Go to Top of Page

RichBeau
Fireman



Posted - 09/18/2005 :  09:00:04 AM  Show Profile
No Dennis, there's really no standard but there are a lot of considerations and it all depends on what you're modeling.

I've seen a number of double deckers and a couple of triple deckers. They seem to use three basic ways to get up and down. The most popular lately is the hidden helix. This permits mainline routes to ascend quickly and in minimum space. You can also ramp exposed trackage upward usually with a grade at something like 4% or less. Most times I've seen this there's helper service available. Usually there's some very cool modeling of the helper facilities. I've also seen on logging layouts a switchback or cable system to take cars up some very steep inclines (8%-9%).

--Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2748 Go to Top of Page

On30fan
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/18/2005 :  11:50:40 AM  Show Profile
Also there is the mushroom design, 2 decks facing in oppostite directions. Hard to explain unless you've seen one in action.
Joe Fugate's Siskiyou Line is probably the best known example of this type. His layout uses the grade of the line to go up, it winds around the room, the second deck ends up above the first without using a helix or switchbacks.

http://siskiyou.railfan.net/index.html


Cheers,
Steve
San Juan Lumber Company
Niagara Frontier Traction Company

Country: USA | Posts: 506 Go to Top of Page

On30fan
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/18/2005 :  11:50:40 AM  Show Profile
Also there is the mushroom design, 2 decks facing in oppostite directions. Hard to explain unless you've seen one in action.
Joe Fugate's Siskiyou Line is probably the best known example of this type. His layout uses the grade of the line to go up, it winds around the room, the second deck ends up above the first without using a helix or switchbacks.

http://siskiyou.railfan.net/index.html


Cheers,
Steve
San Juan Lumber Company
Niagara Frontier Traction Company

Country: USA | Posts: 506 Go to Top of Page

dsteele
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/18/2005 :  6:22:12 PM  Show Profile
OK, guys, thanks. Appreciate the info and the new website, which I've bookmarked for future study.

Dennis



Country: USA | Posts: 400 Go to Top of Page

dsteele
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/18/2005 :  6:22:12 PM  Show Profile
OK, guys, thanks. Appreciate the info and the new website, which I've bookmarked for future study.

Dennis



Country: USA | Posts: 400 Go to Top of Page
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