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jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/13/2005 :  2:30:44 PM  Show Profile
Definitly some wonderful shots John. The mountains in the background are great.

Thank you,
Joe <><



Country: USA | Posts: 2831 Go to Top of Page

jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/13/2005 :  2:30:44 PM  Show Profile
Definitly some wonderful shots John. The mountains in the background are great.

Thank you,
Joe <><



Country: USA | Posts: 2831 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/13/2005 :  3:16:08 PM  Show Profile
John, I waited to look at these until I was back home with high speed cable, but the wait was worth it. You've got a lot of really nice photos, and a lot to refer to when you start on your layout scenery.

Back when I was a senior in college, I saw a photo of a 75 pound strawberry that had been grown in Alaska. I remember the caption with the photo saying that growing produce to very large sizes was not uncommon because of Alaska's very rich soil. That so surprised me that I've never forgotten it.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/13/2005 :  3:16:08 PM  Show Profile
John, I waited to look at these until I was back home with high speed cable, but the wait was worth it. You've got a lot of really nice photos, and a lot to refer to when you start on your layout scenery.

Back when I was a senior in college, I saw a photo of a 75 pound strawberry that had been grown in Alaska. I remember the caption with the photo saying that growing produce to very large sizes was not uncommon because of Alaska's very rich soil. That so surprised me that I've never forgotten it.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/13/2005 :  6:22:18 PM  Show Profile
Bruce,
They run the cars over an open trestle and open the hopper doors and gravity lets it fall to the ground.
The process is similar to loading in that the train keeps on rolling as they are dumping.

Here is a picture from John Combs web site.
www.alaskarails.org



Russ,
I had the same thought after seeing this operation.
A few years ago Roundhouse came out with 3 bay hoppers lettered for the Alaska RR which I was going to use with a coal mine.
I bought 12 of them.
However I can have a larger waterfront area by using them for a gravel operation.

Mike,
All of the large vegetables are grown in a part of Alaska known as the Mat-Su Valley which is about the size of West Virginia.
The farms are a result of 200 families mostly from the Midwest being relocated here in 1935
This was one of FDR's New Deal projects.
Some of the original farms still exist.
Along with great soil most of the families were farmers in the lower 48 so they brought a knowledge of farming methods with them.
Also they receive up to 20 hours of daylight during the growing season with moderate temperatures and an above average amount of rain.
So all in all perfect conditions for growing large vegetables.
Here are a couple more pictures of the display.
Not sure what all the products are and their exact size but I do know they are much larger than anything that can be found locally.








Joe,
The mountains are beautiful and everywhere you look you will see them.
Definitely breathtaking.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13309 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/13/2005 :  6:22:18 PM  Show Profile
Bruce,
They run the cars over an open trestle and open the hopper doors and gravity lets it fall to the ground.
The process is similar to loading in that the train keeps on rolling as they are dumping.

Here is a picture from John Combs web site.
www.alaskarails.org



Russ,
I had the same thought after seeing this operation.
A few years ago Roundhouse came out with 3 bay hoppers lettered for the Alaska RR which I was going to use with a coal mine.
I bought 12 of them.
However I can have a larger waterfront area by using them for a gravel operation.

Mike,
All of the large vegetables are grown in a part of Alaska known as the Mat-Su Valley which is about the size of West Virginia.
The farms are a result of 200 families mostly from the Midwest being relocated here in 1935
This was one of FDR's New Deal projects.
Some of the original farms still exist.
Along with great soil most of the families were farmers in the lower 48 so they brought a knowledge of farming methods with them.
Also they receive up to 20 hours of daylight during the growing season with moderate temperatures and an above average amount of rain.
So all in all perfect conditions for growing large vegetables.
Here are a couple more pictures of the display.
Not sure what all the products are and their exact size but I do know they are much larger than anything that can be found locally.








Joe,
The mountains are beautiful and everywhere you look you will see them.
Definitely breathtaking.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13309 Go to Top of Page

louis and Sabrina
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/14/2005 :  12:36:28 AM  Show Profile
Great shots, John!

We went on a trip on the train last weekend. The Tanana Valley Model Railroad Club got our whole family a pass for a trip from Fairbanks to Denali and Return on Saturday. Great time and the boys loved it.

I'll try to get some pictures posted when the film comes back. The digital camera went on the fritz so I had to dig out the old Olympus OM-1. I hope the pictures turn out. I'd just about managed to forget what F-stops are for!.....Louis



Country: | Posts: 118 Go to Top of Page

louis and Sabrina
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/14/2005 :  12:36:28 AM  Show Profile
Great shots, John!

We went on a trip on the train last weekend. The Tanana Valley Model Railroad Club got our whole family a pass for a trip from Fairbanks to Denali and Return on Saturday. Great time and the boys loved it.

I'll try to get some pictures posted when the film comes back. The digital camera went on the fritz so I had to dig out the old Olympus OM-1. I hope the pictures turn out. I'd just about managed to forget what F-stops are for!.....Louis



Country: | Posts: 118 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/14/2005 :  9:25:09 PM  Show Profile
Hi Louis,
I hope the pictures come out as I would like to see them.
Did you ever find the picture you were looking for?
If not what size are we talking about for the mural as there are some with the mountain in the background on John's site.

The next part of the vacation was to ride the Alaska Railroad.

We took the Glacier Discovery train which is strictly a train trip for tourists.
Here is what the official web site says about the train.

Ride the rail to Spencer Glacier and steal away on a gentle float tour among the icebergs at Spencer Lake and down the Placer River. Professional guides lead the trip.

Since the National Forest Service has a person on the train each day to explain to the tourists what they are seeing we were able to travel at a great price.

We did not do the rafting part but just rode the train.

Here is a picture of the train as it arrived at the station.



Actually this engine was on the back of the train as the trip only has us travel a certain distance and then come back to the starting point so there is an engine on both ends of the train.

The engine on the front of the train was an RDC.




Here we are letting the rafters off the train and will pick them up downriver on the way back.
There were a lot of coaches on the train and I am not sure why since there were only about 20 people rafting and maybe 10 people just seeing the sights.




Aside from the scenery we were also on the lookout for wild life.
This is a marmot which is common in Alaska and is sometimes referred to as a giant squirrel.




This is the back of the train taken from the RDC.




This is the first of many glaciers we were able to view from the train.



To be continued.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13309 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/14/2005 :  9:25:09 PM  Show Profile
Hi Louis,
I hope the pictures come out as I would like to see them.
Did you ever find the picture you were looking for?
If not what size are we talking about for the mural as there are some with the mountain in the background on John's site.

The next part of the vacation was to ride the Alaska Railroad.

We took the Glacier Discovery train which is strictly a train trip for tourists.
Here is what the official web site says about the train.

Ride the rail to Spencer Glacier and steal away on a gentle float tour among the icebergs at Spencer Lake and down the Placer River. Professional guides lead the trip.

Since the National Forest Service has a person on the train each day to explain to the tourists what they are seeing we were able to travel at a great price.

We did not do the rafting part but just rode the train.

Here is a picture of the train as it arrived at the station.



Actually this engine was on the back of the train as the trip only has us travel a certain distance and then come back to the starting point so there is an engine on both ends of the train.

The engine on the front of the train was an RDC.




Here we are letting the rafters off the train and will pick them up downriver on the way back.
There were a lot of coaches on the train and I am not sure why since there were only about 20 people rafting and maybe 10 people just seeing the sights.




Aside from the scenery we were also on the lookout for wild life.
This is a marmot which is common in Alaska and is sometimes referred to as a giant squirrel.




This is the back of the train taken from the RDC.




This is the first of many glaciers we were able to view from the train.



To be continued.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13309 Go to Top of Page

anbhurst
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/15/2005 :  03:52:36 AM  Show Profile
John,

I've really appreciated your Alaskan pictures; they have brought back some fond memories of the year I live there. The veggies remind me of the Mantanuska (Sp?) Valley and King's Lake area. I envy Louis and Sabrina's trip to Denali and your glacier express trip. Looking forward to some more great pictures of Alaska.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Bbags

. . .The next part of the vacation was to ride the Alaska Railroad. . .


Allen
Modeling the East in the West on the Northeastern Pacific RIM, Oregon, that is!

Country: USA | Posts: 7259 Go to Top of Page

anbhurst
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/15/2005 :  03:52:36 AM  Show Profile
John,

I've really appreciated your Alaskan pictures; they have brought back some fond memories of the year I live there. The veggies remind me of the Mantanuska (Sp?) Valley and King's Lake area. I envy Louis and Sabrina's trip to Denali and your glacier express trip. Looking forward to some more great pictures of Alaska.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Bbags

. . .The next part of the vacation was to ride the Alaska Railroad. . .


Allen
Modeling the East in the West on the Northeastern Pacific RIM, Oregon, that is!

Country: USA | Posts: 7259 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/15/2005 :  08:40:51 AM  Show Profile
John,
Thanks for the pictures of where and how they empty those hoppers. It is reminiscent of the old coal trestles, only made of concrete.



Country: USA | Posts: 31248 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/15/2005 :  08:40:51 AM  Show Profile
John,
Thanks for the pictures of where and how they empty those hoppers. It is reminiscent of the old coal trestles, only made of concrete.



Country: USA | Posts: 31248 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/16/2005 :  10:58:31 PM  Show Profile
Allen,
You are correct that almost all the vegetables are grown in the Matanuska-Susitna valley which is the size of the state of West Virginia.
It has been shortened to the Mat-Su Valley which is a lot easier to say and spell.

Back to riding the Alaska Railroad.
The next thing we know the engineer has stopped the train to show us some wildlife.
Next to the train about 12 feet up in a tree is a porcupine.
I took about 10 pictures but while he was climbing down the tree I could not get a good one of the head.




Since my daughter works for the US Forest Service she knows all of the crew that work on this particular train.
I was able to spend some time riding in the front of the RDC car and here is a picture of the engineer as he takes us down the tracks.



Here is a picture of the RDC car.
The car has a compartment at each end so that the engineer can drive the car in either direction just by changing his position.
The RDC's carry passengers and have room for baggage.
They are also used by the Alaska RR for runs where there is a limited number of passengers.




We next stopped at what looked like a tent in the middle of nowhere.






Inside the tent was a rather large gun.
Actually this tent was across the tracks from a section house that is used in the winter to watch for the danger of an avalanche.
One of the many problems facing the Alaska RR is the closure of the tracks due to a large avalanche.
The guns are set up so that the workers can fire a shell while the snow cover is not that great and start a small avalanche before they would become large enough to cover the tracks.
I had trouble getting the gun into one picture.



We finally recruited the conductor to help us lift the flap so that I could get a good picture.



While the gun was an easy access for us the ammunition was safely secured in a cement bunker with steel doors built into the side of the hill.




The last bit of wildlife we saw was a bear.
This one was a lot farther away from us than the ones in Bruce's back yard.




The last stop was to pick up the rafters who were on the river as we were looking at the sights.





This is the locomotive that brought us back to our starting point after a very enjoyable 4 hour train ride.




John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13309 Go to Top of Page
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