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[ Active Members: 3 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 79 ]  [ Total: 82 ]  [ Newest Member: jfields ]
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Author Previous Topic: Just a shack..... Topic Next Topic: Resin casting problem
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Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 08/19/2005 :  10:36:31 AM  Show Profile
I still have several Jack Work articles from the sixties, early seventies archived: Sawmill and a couple of bridges come to mind. Still top quality work! Definetly one of the best!

Chuck D.



Country: USA | Posts: 1560 Go to Top of Page

Pygar
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/19/2005 :  12:28:27 PM  Show Profile
It's hard to believe such work could be done in Durham's... what a lot of hard work went into them! Nowadays when Aves Apoxie Sculpt is easily available, it is still good to look back and learn from someone who had to do things the hard way...


Country: | Posts: 123 Go to Top of Page

Pygar
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/19/2005 :  12:28:27 PM  Show Profile
It's hard to believe such work could be done in Durham's... what a lot of hard work went into them! Nowadays when Aves Apoxie Sculpt is easily available, it is still good to look back and learn from someone who had to do things the hard way...


Country: | Posts: 123 Go to Top of Page

teejay
Fireman



Posted - 08/19/2005 :  9:23:36 PM  Show Profile
When I go to the Modular Club meetings every Tuesday , I usually browse through the library for old articles . The craftsmen of yesteryear still blow me away with their ingenuity ( given the resources they had ) . We've talked about this before on RRL and most of us have several legends in mind when it comes to our reasons for being in the hobby .

Terry



Country: Canada | Posts: 5853 Go to Top of Page

teejay
Fireman



Posted - 08/19/2005 :  9:23:36 PM  Show Profile
When I go to the Modular Club meetings every Tuesday , I usually browse through the library for old articles . The craftsmen of yesteryear still blow me away with their ingenuity ( given the resources they had ) . We've talked about this before on RRL and most of us have several legends in mind when it comes to our reasons for being in the hobby .

Terry



Country: Canada | Posts: 5853 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 08/20/2005 :  09:55:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Philip's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Pygar

It's hard to believe such work could be done in Durham's... what a lot of hard work went into them! Nowadays when Aves Apoxie Sculpt is easily available, it is still good to look back and learn from someone who had to do things the hard way...



Pygar,
Where can this Aves Apoxie Sculpt be purchased?
Sound as if you have crafted some scale figures..care to share how its done?

Terry, I agree, Jack is another legend. I read in a old MR John Allen used bees wax. I went out and purchased a 4lb block, made up some HO armatures and well....figures looked like a deformed creature from mother nature.The bees wax smells real good and would make great candles! Yet another reason to model On30. I have not tried armatures in On30. I wish someone would do a tutorial here at RLF. The following link has a small tutorial on making O-scale mature audience figures & other MRR stuff. http://theotherlionel.com

Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2684 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 08/20/2005 :  09:55:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Philip's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Pygar

It's hard to believe such work could be done in Durham's... what a lot of hard work went into them! Nowadays when Aves Apoxie Sculpt is easily available, it is still good to look back and learn from someone who had to do things the hard way...



Pygar,
Where can this Aves Apoxie Sculpt be purchased?
Sound as if you have crafted some scale figures..care to share how its done?

Terry, I agree, Jack is another legend. I read in a old MR John Allen used bees wax. I went out and purchased a 4lb block, made up some HO armatures and well....figures looked like a deformed creature from mother nature.The bees wax smells real good and would make great candles! Yet another reason to model On30. I have not tried armatures in On30. I wish someone would do a tutorial here at RLF. The following link has a small tutorial on making O-scale mature audience figures & other MRR stuff. http://theotherlionel.com

Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2684 Go to Top of Page

Pygar
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/20/2005 :  2:54:21 PM  Show Profile
http://www.avesstudio.com/Products/Apoxie_Sculpt/apoxie_sculpt.html is as good a source as any, but many hobby shops have it or can get it. I am not a sculptor but there are quite a few sites that teach sculpting from epoxy putties. Everyone has a favorite, some even use the blue and yellow ribbon stuff you mix 'till it's green... but I once was on a site with a message board for real sculptors of miniatures to show their stuff and trade tips. The Aves Sculpt was hands down for its superior handling qualities. No other brand came close.

http://www.mylargescale.com/articles/articles/figureclass/ch1/figures-11.asp is a good start, even though he uses the polymer clays instead that have to be baked, and which have a tendency to "spring back" after being moved with a tool. I figure a whole two-tub set of Aves will cost less than buying the equivalent in those little squares of polyclay, too. And you can't use polyclay to fix stuff around the house, either... you may be able to slip it into your budget as a "I need to fix that leaky pipe, hon, and I'll find something else to do with the rest!" item!



Country: | Posts: 123 Go to Top of Page

Pygar
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/20/2005 :  2:54:21 PM  Show Profile
http://www.avesstudio.com/Products/Apoxie_Sculpt/apoxie_sculpt.html is as good a source as any, but many hobby shops have it or can get it. I am not a sculptor but there are quite a few sites that teach sculpting from epoxy putties. Everyone has a favorite, some even use the blue and yellow ribbon stuff you mix 'till it's green... but I once was on a site with a message board for real sculptors of miniatures to show their stuff and trade tips. The Aves Sculpt was hands down for its superior handling qualities. No other brand came close.

http://www.mylargescale.com/articles/articles/figureclass/ch1/figures-11.asp is a good start, even though he uses the polymer clays instead that have to be baked, and which have a tendency to "spring back" after being moved with a tool. I figure a whole two-tub set of Aves will cost less than buying the equivalent in those little squares of polyclay, too. And you can't use polyclay to fix stuff around the house, either... you may be able to slip it into your budget as a "I need to fix that leaky pipe, hon, and I'll find something else to do with the rest!" item!



Country: | Posts: 123 Go to Top of Page

Peterpools
Engineer



Posted - 08/20/2005 :  8:09:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Peterpools's Homepage
Hi All
I remember a great deal of Jack Works articles in MR. He is one of the pioneers of the hobby who pushed the envelope. I have saved quite a few of them and as my railroad requires, plan on adding a few of his structures. Of course, everyone remembers: Jack Work Builds a Better Turnout. A tremendous article and I still can't do it anywhere nearly as well as Jack.



Country: USA | Posts: 12335 Go to Top of Page

Peterpools
Engineer



Posted - 08/20/2005 :  8:09:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Peterpools's Homepage
Hi All
I remember a great deal of Jack Works articles in MR. He is one of the pioneers of the hobby who pushed the envelope. I have saved quite a few of them and as my railroad requires, plan on adding a few of his structures. Of course, everyone remembers: Jack Work Builds a Better Turnout. A tremendous article and I still can't do it anywhere nearly as well as Jack.



Country: USA | Posts: 12335 Go to Top of Page

railphotog
Fireman



Posted - 09/07/2005 :  09:18:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit railphotog's Homepage
I recall Jack Work's articles in the magazines too. I was a teenage model railroader at the time and was always in awe at the stuff he could do. I used his article on making a sandhouse to make my own copy in O scale - I had an 027 Louis Marx layout at the time, before I switched to HO. I didn't have very much money and I don't think we had much of a hobby shop in our town at the time, so I made my structures from cardboard and balsa wood strips. Here are two shots of my tower that I probably made when I was fourteen:





I took these photos several years later after I switched to HO, and borrowed the model from a friend whom I had given it to. That's a Canadian penny near the front to show scale. I borrowed a white sheet from my mother and hung it over the oil tank in our back yard for the background in the photo. I think the model was probably sitting on a card table. This was probably with my first "serious" 35mm camera when I was around 19 or so.

I scribed the cardboard to simulate the boards, used a bent nail for the sand spout, chain from a sink stopper for the spout, and painted it with thinned household paint that I got from my father. Used cut up sandpaper for the roofing.

Ahh! The good 'ol days! Just glad I'm still not there!



Edited by - railphotog on 09/07/2005 9:45:03 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 4027 Go to Top of Page

railphotog
Fireman



Posted - 09/07/2005 :  09:18:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit railphotog's Homepage
I recall Jack Work's articles in the magazines too. I was a teenage model railroader at the time and was always in awe at the stuff he could do. I used his article on making a sandhouse to make my own copy in O scale - I had an 027 Louis Marx layout at the time, before I switched to HO. I didn't have very much money and I don't think we had much of a hobby shop in our town at the time, so I made my structures from cardboard and balsa wood strips. Here are two shots of my tower that I probably made when I was fourteen:





I took these photos several years later after I switched to HO, and borrowed the model from a friend whom I had given it to. That's a Canadian penny near the front to show scale. I borrowed a white sheet from my mother and hung it over the oil tank in our back yard for the background in the photo. I think the model was probably sitting on a card table. This was probably with my first "serious" 35mm camera when I was around 19 or so.

I scribed the cardboard to simulate the boards, used a bent nail for the sand spout, chain from a sink stopper for the spout, and painted it with thinned household paint that I got from my father. Used cut up sandpaper for the roofing.

Ahh! The good 'ol days! Just glad I'm still not there!



Edited by - railphotog on 09/07/2005 9:45:03 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 4027 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/07/2005 :  4:14:47 PM  Show Profile
You were better at 14 than I am today!


Edited by - Tyson Rayles on 09/07/2005 4:15:39 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 12961 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/07/2005 :  4:14:47 PM  Show Profile
You were better at 14 than I am today!


Edited by - Tyson Rayles on 09/07/2005 4:15:39 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 12961 Go to Top of Page
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