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Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/07/2003 :  12:01:56 PM  Show Profile
Hi All
Yes I think we should definitely all take pictures. I should have a digital camera in a couple or 3 weeks as the tax refund should be here.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13310 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 03/10/2003 :  7:27:14 PM  Show Profile
All,

I have decided to take the “plunge” & start Foss’ Landing. I will do all of the preliminary work that is mentioned in the manual. When you start the next building, I will be ready to jump in. I will catch up as time permits & maybe I can finish with you.

Last night I cleaned up all the castings (resin & metal). Whew, that was a job. I enjoyed it but that took some time. I have all the holes drilled for my toothpicks & put all my resin castings on toothpicks (Mike, thanks for the tip. It works great. ). Tonight, I’ll wash the metal castings & try to put the base paint on all of the “wood” resin castings.

I have two questions. When you put the paint on the resin castings, what do you do? Do you paint the colors on top of each other or separate or what? I tried Brett’s method as written & I think they turned out too dark.

Also, usually I wash my metal castings in soapy water, but some of these castings are so small (the oars, etc.) they will be hard to handle. What do you guys do & how do you clean your metal castings?

Mike,
I am willing to take a picture & send it to Brett when we’re finished. Whatever the group decides.

Looking forward to many hours of modeling together.

Paul B.



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 03/10/2003 :  7:27:14 PM  Show Profile
All,

I have decided to take the “plunge” & start Foss’ Landing. I will do all of the preliminary work that is mentioned in the manual. When you start the next building, I will be ready to jump in. I will catch up as time permits & maybe I can finish with you.

Last night I cleaned up all the castings (resin & metal). Whew, that was a job. I enjoyed it but that took some time. I have all the holes drilled for my toothpicks & put all my resin castings on toothpicks (Mike, thanks for the tip. It works great. ). Tonight, I’ll wash the metal castings & try to put the base paint on all of the “wood” resin castings.

I have two questions. When you put the paint on the resin castings, what do you do? Do you paint the colors on top of each other or separate or what? I tried Brett’s method as written & I think they turned out too dark.

Also, usually I wash my metal castings in soapy water, but some of these castings are so small (the oars, etc.) they will be hard to handle. What do you guys do & how do you clean your metal castings?

Mike,
I am willing to take a picture & send it to Brett when we’re finished. Whatever the group decides.

Looking forward to many hours of modeling together.

Paul B.



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 03/10/2003 :  7:31:31 PM  Show Profile
In case there is some confusion when I asked about "painting the castings", I was referring to the base coat on the "wood" castings.

Thanks,
Paul



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 03/10/2003 :  7:31:31 PM  Show Profile
In case there is some confusion when I asked about "painting the castings", I was referring to the base coat on the "wood" castings.

Thanks,
Paul



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2003 :  9:02:19 PM  Show Profile
Hi Paul
you wrote
I have two questions. When you put the paint on the resin castings, what do you do? Do you paint the colors on top of each other or separate or what? I tried Brett’s method as written & I think they turned out too dark.

Also, usually I wash my metal castings in soapy water, but some of these castings are so small (the oars, etc.) they will be hard to handle. What do you guys do & how do you clean your metal castings?


First I am not answering for Mike as he has done a lot more with castings than I have.
On the resin castings I followed Brett's suggestions of dabbing the castings randomly with the different thinned down mixtures. This means that you are not coating every part of every casting with each color. Also I did not use every color he suggests and I do not remember which I did use.
He also suggests going from dark to light which left a lighter color on a lot of the castings when done.
Since a final color will be added later I am not sure if there is a problem with how dark the initial color is.

For the metal castings since they are so small I did not try to wash them but just wiped them and then primed them.

I have been working on Big Lou's for the last few days to take a break from Foss' but I expect that by Thursday I will be ready to begin "The Launch Company". So if that fits your schedule then let us know. However, Mike takes the weekends off to do the work train when he is at the lake and Harry is on vacation and Jim is shingling his roof shingle by shingle so maybe next Monday would give everyone a chance to get caught up.
Wow am I rambling on and on



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13310 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2003 :  9:02:19 PM  Show Profile
Hi Paul
you wrote
I have two questions. When you put the paint on the resin castings, what do you do? Do you paint the colors on top of each other or separate or what? I tried Brett’s method as written & I think they turned out too dark.

Also, usually I wash my metal castings in soapy water, but some of these castings are so small (the oars, etc.) they will be hard to handle. What do you guys do & how do you clean your metal castings?


First I am not answering for Mike as he has done a lot more with castings than I have.
On the resin castings I followed Brett's suggestions of dabbing the castings randomly with the different thinned down mixtures. This means that you are not coating every part of every casting with each color. Also I did not use every color he suggests and I do not remember which I did use.
He also suggests going from dark to light which left a lighter color on a lot of the castings when done.
Since a final color will be added later I am not sure if there is a problem with how dark the initial color is.

For the metal castings since they are so small I did not try to wash them but just wiped them and then primed them.

I have been working on Big Lou's for the last few days to take a break from Foss' but I expect that by Thursday I will be ready to begin "The Launch Company". So if that fits your schedule then let us know. However, Mike takes the weekends off to do the work train when he is at the lake and Harry is on vacation and Jim is shingling his roof shingle by shingle so maybe next Monday would give everyone a chance to get caught up.
Wow am I rambling on and on



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13310 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2003 :  10:11:05 PM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by paulbrockatsf

In case there is some confusion when I asked about "painting the castings", I was referring to the base coat on the "wood" castings.

Thanks,
Paul




Paul, I use just two colors on the wood castings: Polly Rail Tie Brown and Polly Earth. I use a semi-dry brush and just randomly blot the colors on, frequently overlapping them. I probably use more of the Rail Brown than the Earth, but that's because later I dust everything with a mixture of light and medium raw umber chalks and gold ochre chalks. (The chalks, more than the paints, are what make the wood castings look like wood.) I use Rembrandt chalks (available at most Michaels) because they offer several shades of the same basic color (8 shades of raw umber, for example) and because the pigments tend to be very fine and smooth.

I never wash white metal castings. I know that most folks do, and that's the recommended procedure. I guess I'm too lazy to bother with it. However, I have also never had a problem getting paint to stick either. I avoid handling the castings as much as I can and I primarily use acrylic paints on them.

Lately, I've gotten in the habit of spraying the metal castings with Floquil Earth as a base coat and letting it dry for 48+ hours. I don't know that it makes a great deal of difference after the final acrylic paints are applied, so the jury is still out on that one.

And that's pretty much how I go about it all.

I hope to get back to Foss' Landing tomorrow night. My daughters came over tonight and we had a combined birthday "party" for one of them and my wife. So no model work got done this evening.



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2003 :  10:11:05 PM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by paulbrockatsf

In case there is some confusion when I asked about "painting the castings", I was referring to the base coat on the "wood" castings.

Thanks,
Paul




Paul, I use just two colors on the wood castings: Polly Rail Tie Brown and Polly Earth. I use a semi-dry brush and just randomly blot the colors on, frequently overlapping them. I probably use more of the Rail Brown than the Earth, but that's because later I dust everything with a mixture of light and medium raw umber chalks and gold ochre chalks. (The chalks, more than the paints, are what make the wood castings look like wood.) I use Rembrandt chalks (available at most Michaels) because they offer several shades of the same basic color (8 shades of raw umber, for example) and because the pigments tend to be very fine and smooth.

I never wash white metal castings. I know that most folks do, and that's the recommended procedure. I guess I'm too lazy to bother with it. However, I have also never had a problem getting paint to stick either. I avoid handling the castings as much as I can and I primarily use acrylic paints on them.

Lately, I've gotten in the habit of spraying the metal castings with Floquil Earth as a base coat and letting it dry for 48+ hours. I don't know that it makes a great deal of difference after the final acrylic paints are applied, so the jury is still out on that one.

And that's pretty much how I go about it all.

I hope to get back to Foss' Landing tomorrow night. My daughters came over tonight and we had a combined birthday "party" for one of them and my wife. So no model work got done this evening.



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 03/11/2003 :  11:17:39 AM  Show Profile
Paul,

If you have not visited the "Online Clinics" at Sierra West website, there is a clinic for "Painting and Weathering Resin Castings". It was useful to me, when I started painting the castings.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 03/11/2003 :  11:17:39 AM  Show Profile
Paul,

If you have not visited the "Online Clinics" at Sierra West website, there is a clinic for "Painting and Weathering Resin Castings". It was useful to me, when I started painting the castings.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 03/11/2003 :  3:57:01 PM  Show Profile
Jim,

Thank you for the tip. I went to the SW website & found the clinic. I think this will be a big help. In fact, I think all 3 will help. Brett must have updated & added these clinics recently. I had never seen them before.

Thanks again,
Paul



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 03/11/2003 :  3:57:01 PM  Show Profile
Jim,

Thank you for the tip. I went to the SW website & found the clinic. I think this will be a big help. In fact, I think all 3 will help. Brett must have updated & added these clinics recently. I had never seen them before.

Thanks again,
Paul



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/12/2003 :  09:40:38 AM  Show Profile
Well, I made some fairly decent progress last night. I got the stairs attached and the handrail and porch rails attached. I wasn't going to put in the view blocks. But I changed my mind and went ahead. I figured it was less than 5 minutes to cut and glue the construction paper, so why not.

I changed my mind about using individual wood shingles on the roof and decided to use the paper ones included with the kit. So I got those stained and half of the long roof shingled. I did vary from the instructions for staining and gluing, though. I semi-dry brushed slightly shaken Floquil Rail Brown first. Next I semi-dry brushed slightly shaken Floquil CN Gray and let the two blend where they overlapped. Then I randomly streaked fully shaken Floquil Weathered Black. After the three paints had settled into the paper but not dried, I washed each sheet of shingles with mineral spirits. The overall effect created a variety of highly weathered wood-tone colors. However, it looked to me like the mineral spirits left a sheen even after drying, so I lightly dusted the shingles with some raw umber and neutral gray chalks (powdered and mixed together before dusting).

I have used colored markers (warm grays and cool umbers) before to stain paper shingles and thought the results were pretty good. But the results I got last night were by far the most realistic yet. Of course, real wood shingles like Jim is using would have been even better, but I got lazy...

I forgot to mention that I attached the shingle strips with my Elmer's General Purpose white glue stick. It's easy to apply to the back of each strip and the whole process goes quickly. I was a little leary of using the spray adhesive. Giving me a can of that is like giving me some 5-minute epoxy.... oops!



Edited by - MikeC on 03/12/2003 09:54:33 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/12/2003 :  09:40:38 AM  Show Profile
Well, I made some fairly decent progress last night. I got the stairs attached and the handrail and porch rails attached. I wasn't going to put in the view blocks. But I changed my mind and went ahead. I figured it was less than 5 minutes to cut and glue the construction paper, so why not.

I changed my mind about using individual wood shingles on the roof and decided to use the paper ones included with the kit. So I got those stained and half of the long roof shingled. I did vary from the instructions for staining and gluing, though. I semi-dry brushed slightly shaken Floquil Rail Brown first. Next I semi-dry brushed slightly shaken Floquil CN Gray and let the two blend where they overlapped. Then I randomly streaked fully shaken Floquil Weathered Black. After the three paints had settled into the paper but not dried, I washed each sheet of shingles with mineral spirits. The overall effect created a variety of highly weathered wood-tone colors. However, it looked to me like the mineral spirits left a sheen even after drying, so I lightly dusted the shingles with some raw umber and neutral gray chalks (powdered and mixed together before dusting).

I have used colored markers (warm grays and cool umbers) before to stain paper shingles and thought the results were pretty good. But the results I got last night were by far the most realistic yet. Of course, real wood shingles like Jim is using would have been even better, but I got lazy...

I forgot to mention that I attached the shingle strips with my Elmer's General Purpose white glue stick. It's easy to apply to the back of each strip and the whole process goes quickly. I was a little leary of using the spray adhesive. Giving me a can of that is like giving me some 5-minute epoxy.... oops!



Edited by - MikeC on 03/12/2003 09:54:33 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page
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