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ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2003 :  7:25:08 PM  Show Profile
Mike,

Fantastic rock carving!!!. It jumps out and grabs you. I was not expecting the relief you gave to each individual rock. WOW!! Great photos as usual.

Jim




Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2003 :  7:25:08 PM  Show Profile
Mike,

Fantastic rock carving!!!. It jumps out and grabs you. I was not expecting the relief you gave to each individual rock. WOW!! Great photos as usual.

Jim




Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/15/2003 :  9:18:19 PM  Show Profile
Thanks, Jim.

And now for Part 2:

As the photos below show, the staining is finished. Actually, the colors look better than the photos show. (As usual, I didn't do anything special with the lighting for this type of photo, so they're a bit dark.)

I did change my original plans somewhat, though. Instead of individually staining every stone, I stained about 25% of them with a #0 red sable brush. I used ochers and umbers for most of the staining, with some slate and burnt sienna here and there. Then I applied several washes of burnt umber and stone gray to the entire wall. I'm happy with the results.

As I said in an earlier post, I don't know how much of the wall will actually be visible once the structures are in place. We'll have to see, I guess. Oh, and about the high water line: I'm going to wait until I have a better idea of how the surrounding shoreline will tie into the Landing base before I do any more staining.










Edited by - MikeC on 02/15/2003 9:19:57 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/15/2003 :  9:18:19 PM  Show Profile
Thanks, Jim.

And now for Part 2:

As the photos below show, the staining is finished. Actually, the colors look better than the photos show. (As usual, I didn't do anything special with the lighting for this type of photo, so they're a bit dark.)

I did change my original plans somewhat, though. Instead of individually staining every stone, I stained about 25% of them with a #0 red sable brush. I used ochers and umbers for most of the staining, with some slate and burnt sienna here and there. Then I applied several washes of burnt umber and stone gray to the entire wall. I'm happy with the results.

As I said in an earlier post, I don't know how much of the wall will actually be visible once the structures are in place. We'll have to see, I guess. Oh, and about the high water line: I'm going to wait until I have a better idea of how the surrounding shoreline will tie into the Landing base before I do any more staining.










Edited by - MikeC on 02/15/2003 9:19:57 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/15/2003 :  10:15:22 PM  Show Profile
Hi Mike
That rockwork is outstanding. I hope that it will be able to be seen once the buildings are in place for it is too impressive to remain hidden.
Just out of curiosity what tool did you use to carve the walls.
It looks like you carved each stone one at a time. How long does work of that quality take.
Thanks for the pictures.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13311 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/15/2003 :  10:15:22 PM  Show Profile
Hi Mike
That rockwork is outstanding. I hope that it will be able to be seen once the buildings are in place for it is too impressive to remain hidden.
Just out of curiosity what tool did you use to carve the walls.
It looks like you carved each stone one at a time. How long does work of that quality take.
Thanks for the pictures.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13311 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2003 :  11:52:46 PM  Show Profile
Mike,

The wall just gets better and better. Great looking.

About visibility of the wall. What's not visible is like finishing the back of a building. From these photos we know what it looks like and most important you know it's there and finished,

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2003 :  11:52:46 PM  Show Profile
Mike,

The wall just gets better and better. Great looking.

About visibility of the wall. What's not visible is like finishing the back of a building. From these photos we know what it looks like and most important you know it's there and finished,

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2003 :  08:38:07 AM  Show Profile
From Jim
"About visibility of the wall. What's not visible is like finishing the back of a building. From these photos we know what it looks like and most important you know it's there and finished,

Jim'


I could not agree more. Is that not what finescale modeling is all about. Modeling those details that may not always be visible to the general viewer but are very visible to the person who has done the model.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13311 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2003 :  08:38:07 AM  Show Profile
From Jim
"About visibility of the wall. What's not visible is like finishing the back of a building. From these photos we know what it looks like and most important you know it's there and finished,

Jim'


I could not agree more. Is that not what finescale modeling is all about. Modeling those details that may not always be visible to the general viewer but are very visible to the person who has done the model.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13311 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2003 :  10:20:07 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Bbags

Hi Mike
That rockwork is outstanding. I hope that it will be able to be seen once the buildings are in place for it is too impressive to remain hidden.
Just out of curiosity what tool did you use to carve the walls.
It looks like you carved each stone one at a time. How long does work of that quality take.
Thanks for the pictures.




Thanks, guys.

John, I used just 3 "tools:" a spray bottle with water, a nylon brush (looks like a large toothbrush), and my trusty old headless T-pin in a pin vise (it's the same one I use to make nail holes). I kept the plaster damp with the sprayer and used the brush to clear away plaster "chips" after I carved a stone or two with the pin.

I didn't keep actual track of the time it took, but I'd guess the carving and staining was around 4 hours total. But keep in mind that I wasn't carving or sculpting the actual rock faces. All I did was carve in the mortar lines. The rock faces were created when I stippled soupy plaster over the wall surfaces (after I remove the forms.)



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2003 :  10:20:07 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Bbags

Hi Mike
That rockwork is outstanding. I hope that it will be able to be seen once the buildings are in place for it is too impressive to remain hidden.
Just out of curiosity what tool did you use to carve the walls.
It looks like you carved each stone one at a time. How long does work of that quality take.
Thanks for the pictures.




Thanks, guys.

John, I used just 3 "tools:" a spray bottle with water, a nylon brush (looks like a large toothbrush), and my trusty old headless T-pin in a pin vise (it's the same one I use to make nail holes). I kept the plaster damp with the sprayer and used the brush to clear away plaster "chips" after I carved a stone or two with the pin.

I didn't keep actual track of the time it took, but I'd guess the carving and staining was around 4 hours total. But keep in mind that I wasn't carving or sculpting the actual rock faces. All I did was carve in the mortar lines. The rock faces were created when I stippled soupy plaster over the wall surfaces (after I remove the forms.)



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2003 :  10:28:51 AM  Show Profile
I had quite a surprise last night when I started back to work on the Clam & Oyster structure. I discovered there was no adhesive on the mylar/acetate windows. I sprayed the front side with Dullcote last week. The paper backing was still attached, but when I peeled it away from the first pane, there was no "sticky." And the same with the second and third panes.

I wound up ACC'ing them to the upper sashes. And putting me together with ACC is always a risky proposition. But it looks like that's the way I will have to do all of the windows. It's a good thing I'm used to it. But I sure wasn't expecting it with this kit.



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2003 :  10:28:51 AM  Show Profile
I had quite a surprise last night when I started back to work on the Clam & Oyster structure. I discovered there was no adhesive on the mylar/acetate windows. I sprayed the front side with Dullcote last week. The paper backing was still attached, but when I peeled it away from the first pane, there was no "sticky." And the same with the second and third panes.

I wound up ACC'ing them to the upper sashes. And putting me together with ACC is always a risky proposition. But it looks like that's the way I will have to do all of the windows. It's a good thing I'm used to it. But I sure wasn't expecting it with this kit.



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Rusty Stumps
Fireman



Posted - 02/16/2003 :  12:08:16 PM  Show Profile
Hey, Mike, the wall looks "marvolus!" I mean it. Fantastic job.

Everytime I think I've improved my modeling abilities you go and raise the bar!



Country: USA | Posts: 7859 Go to Top of Page
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