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MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/09/2003 :  10:32:01 AM  Show Profile
Now, back to business... hehe

I got home from my niece's last night in time to cut out the templates I had drawn the night before. If you haven't read ahead in the manual, these are the templates for cutting the foam layers that make up the different elevations and the shoreline. The next step, after cutting out an gluing the foam to the base, will be to glue strips of wood that will be used as "concrete forms" for the plaster retaining wall. I'm hoping I can get all of that done this afternoon.

I'm also thinking that for the region of the country I'm modeling and the era, a poured concrete wall would be unlikely. What would be more likely is a natural stone wall. So I'm thinking about carving individual stones in the wall after the plaster has set. Should be "fun" in that small area....



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/09/2003 :  10:32:01 AM  Show Profile
Now, back to business... hehe

I got home from my niece's last night in time to cut out the templates I had drawn the night before. If you haven't read ahead in the manual, these are the templates for cutting the foam layers that make up the different elevations and the shoreline. The next step, after cutting out an gluing the foam to the base, will be to glue strips of wood that will be used as "concrete forms" for the plaster retaining wall. I'm hoping I can get all of that done this afternoon.

I'm also thinking that for the region of the country I'm modeling and the era, a poured concrete wall would be unlikely. What would be more likely is a natural stone wall. So I'm thinking about carving individual stones in the wall after the plaster has set. Should be "fun" in that small area....



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Hangem Harry
Crew Chief

Posted - 02/09/2003 :  2:49:31 PM  Show Profile
The natural stone wall should look great Mike. Well I spent 2 hours last night tring to figure out the best placement for my structures using the template. The problem I'm having is enough room between the Clam and Oyster bar and my existing SeaPort structure. I need room for decent size boats to dock at it since there is a track running out onto it.

Maybe if I tried a bottle of that Seyval it would be all clear to me.


Harry



Country: USA | Posts: 793 Go to Top of Page

Hangem Harry
Crew Chief

Posted - 02/09/2003 :  2:49:31 PM  Show Profile
The natural stone wall should look great Mike. Well I spent 2 hours last night tring to figure out the best placement for my structures using the template. The problem I'm having is enough room between the Clam and Oyster bar and my existing SeaPort structure. I need room for decent size boats to dock at it since there is a track running out onto it.

Maybe if I tried a bottle of that Seyval it would be all clear to me.


Harry



Country: USA | Posts: 793 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/09/2003 :  3:08:17 PM  Show Profile
Hi all
My that wine looks good. I think I will have a glass of each to find my personal favorite.
My plan at the moment is to go with wooden pilings along that part of the river. I think they are realistic and I have the pile driving barge that will be working further down river.
I saw in one of my books and easy way to make realistic pilings and I will face the plaster wall with these pilings.
This is my plan for now but of course plans are subject to change.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13310 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/09/2003 :  3:08:17 PM  Show Profile
Hi all
My that wine looks good. I think I will have a glass of each to find my personal favorite.
My plan at the moment is to go with wooden pilings along that part of the river. I think they are realistic and I have the pile driving barge that will be working further down river.
I saw in one of my books and easy way to make realistic pilings and I will face the plaster wall with these pilings.
This is my plan for now but of course plans are subject to change.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13310 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 02/09/2003 :  9:39:55 PM  Show Profile
Mike,

What no Merlot??? Interesting picture of the wine, your image is on all three bottles. Windberg did a self portrait in a brandy sniffer.

I couldn't go with the concrete either and was planning to use a Spanish kit that came with approximately two pounds of individual brick. For mortar, I'll use self hardening clay. Carving the rocks seems an interesting proposal, also John's idea of using wooden pilings is great. It's going to be interesting to see these vistas when all has finished and see the different directions we've taken.

Carry on,

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 02/09/2003 :  9:39:55 PM  Show Profile
Mike,

What no Merlot??? Interesting picture of the wine, your image is on all three bottles. Windberg did a self portrait in a brandy sniffer.

I couldn't go with the concrete either and was planning to use a Spanish kit that came with approximately two pounds of individual brick. For mortar, I'll use self hardening clay. Carving the rocks seems an interesting proposal, also John's idea of using wooden pilings is great. It's going to be interesting to see these vistas when all has finished and see the different directions we've taken.

Carry on,

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

Hangem Harry
Crew Chief

Posted - 02/10/2003 :  09:22:18 AM  Show Profile
Hi guys,

Well after many hours of trying to figure out the locations of my structures I have decided to rebuild that whole section of my layout. I actually started yesterday in the destruction of the existing area. I was reluctate to start but now that I have started, I can't understand why I didn't go this way from the beginning. I am going to make sure I expand it so that I will be able to later add more structures if Brett comes up with more. I have always liked waterfront scenes anyways.

I also have almost complete the final stain of The Clam and Oyster bar. I will probably post photo's later this week.

Harry



Edited by - Hangem Harry on 02/10/2003 09:22:54 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 793 Go to Top of Page

Hangem Harry
Crew Chief

Posted - 02/10/2003 :  09:22:18 AM  Show Profile
Hi guys,

Well after many hours of trying to figure out the locations of my structures I have decided to rebuild that whole section of my layout. I actually started yesterday in the destruction of the existing area. I was reluctate to start but now that I have started, I can't understand why I didn't go this way from the beginning. I am going to make sure I expand it so that I will be able to later add more structures if Brett comes up with more. I have always liked waterfront scenes anyways.

I also have almost complete the final stain of The Clam and Oyster bar. I will probably post photo's later this week.

Harry



Edited by - Hangem Harry on 02/10/2003 09:22:54 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 793 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/10/2003 :  11:10:49 AM  Show Profile
The wine.. ahh, yes... If you like dry, fruity reds, try Stonehill Norton. It's excellent and costs about $20 -$25/bottle. Now back to business....

John, I would probably go with pilings also if I weren't so "committed" to carving stone. Wood pilings, docks, and wharves were quite common along the Osage, Current, and Missouri Rivers at the turn of the century. So I figure if I'm not happy with my adventures as a stone mason, I can hide the results with pilings.

Harry, I thought about redoing part of the peninsula where Foss' is going. But I'd have to relocate too much track to make it workable. I thought about expansion in that area, but it would eat into aisle space. (I may go that route yet. I'm the only one who ever sees my layout, so aisle width isn't a real critical factor like it might be if I had visitors.)

Check this out: I spent most of the afternoon and last night cutting the foam, installing the plaster forms, and pouring the plaster seawall. Measuring and cutting the forms was a pain because there are no clear photographs in that part of the manual of how the back retaining wall is "stepped down." And Brett was not too specific in his written instructions. I finally found some photos in the back of the manual that showed how the wall "stair stepped" down and the foam "terrain" sloped with it. Now for the good part:

I couldn't find my Elmer's Exterior Wood Glue to attach the stripwood forms. I didn't want to go to Walmart just for that one item. So I wound up cutting the forms from 1/2" pink foam and "gluing" them with some Elmer's Squeezable Caulk that I found in the garage. (It's a semi-liquid latex caulk that comes in a squeeze bottle.) It held the foam forms right in place. I let it set for about 30 minutes, then mixed and poured the plaster. After 30 minutes more, I removed the forms. They came right off the plaster with no problem, and the caulk came right up very easily with a small putty knife. The seawall/retaining wall looks great and is ready for carving. I'll post photos if I get a chance later today.

I'm excited about the idea of using foam and caulk for plaster forms. Most folks who work with plaster make their forms from styrene or styrene and wood. And they always mention spraying some sort of release agent on everything to make sure the plaster casting comes away from the forms cleanly (kind of like resin, I guess). But the plaster doesn't stick to the foam or the caulk, and those materials are cheap and easy to use. So I highly recommend it!

I'm ready to start scratchbuilding a stone pump house now.



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/10/2003 :  11:10:49 AM  Show Profile
The wine.. ahh, yes... If you like dry, fruity reds, try Stonehill Norton. It's excellent and costs about $20 -$25/bottle. Now back to business....

John, I would probably go with pilings also if I weren't so "committed" to carving stone. Wood pilings, docks, and wharves were quite common along the Osage, Current, and Missouri Rivers at the turn of the century. So I figure if I'm not happy with my adventures as a stone mason, I can hide the results with pilings.

Harry, I thought about redoing part of the peninsula where Foss' is going. But I'd have to relocate too much track to make it workable. I thought about expansion in that area, but it would eat into aisle space. (I may go that route yet. I'm the only one who ever sees my layout, so aisle width isn't a real critical factor like it might be if I had visitors.)

Check this out: I spent most of the afternoon and last night cutting the foam, installing the plaster forms, and pouring the plaster seawall. Measuring and cutting the forms was a pain because there are no clear photographs in that part of the manual of how the back retaining wall is "stepped down." And Brett was not too specific in his written instructions. I finally found some photos in the back of the manual that showed how the wall "stair stepped" down and the foam "terrain" sloped with it. Now for the good part:

I couldn't find my Elmer's Exterior Wood Glue to attach the stripwood forms. I didn't want to go to Walmart just for that one item. So I wound up cutting the forms from 1/2" pink foam and "gluing" them with some Elmer's Squeezable Caulk that I found in the garage. (It's a semi-liquid latex caulk that comes in a squeeze bottle.) It held the foam forms right in place. I let it set for about 30 minutes, then mixed and poured the plaster. After 30 minutes more, I removed the forms. They came right off the plaster with no problem, and the caulk came right up very easily with a small putty knife. The seawall/retaining wall looks great and is ready for carving. I'll post photos if I get a chance later today.

I'm excited about the idea of using foam and caulk for plaster forms. Most folks who work with plaster make their forms from styrene or styrene and wood. And they always mention spraying some sort of release agent on everything to make sure the plaster casting comes away from the forms cleanly (kind of like resin, I guess). But the plaster doesn't stick to the foam or the caulk, and those materials are cheap and easy to use. So I highly recommend it!

I'm ready to start scratchbuilding a stone pump house now.



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/10/2003 :  3:03:06 PM  Show Profile
Hi Mike
I will save that tip about casting. Sounds very easy and does not require any extra work.
I figured out my footprint and I will have no problem as I have a dedicated area set aside for Foss' and any other structures Brett has to offer.
I will go with the pilings and I will have to make the shoreline and the water line the same as the land will be vertically above the water. I am sure with the rock wall you will do the same.
You are correct about the stepping down on the backside. I finally found the pictures at the end of the instructions. There was also a concern about how to do the 1/2 inch gap in the front between Clam & Oyster company and the Launch Company.
I was also concerned about the signs as my Foss' Landing is on a river which is about 400 miles from the ocean and therefore there would be no clams or oysters. The sign on the side of the building however does not really advertise sales of clams or oysters but of fishing gear and boating equipment. The final details however with the crates of clams could be a problem. Will have to decide what to do with these.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13310 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/10/2003 :  3:03:06 PM  Show Profile
Hi Mike
I will save that tip about casting. Sounds very easy and does not require any extra work.
I figured out my footprint and I will have no problem as I have a dedicated area set aside for Foss' and any other structures Brett has to offer.
I will go with the pilings and I will have to make the shoreline and the water line the same as the land will be vertically above the water. I am sure with the rock wall you will do the same.
You are correct about the stepping down on the backside. I finally found the pictures at the end of the instructions. There was also a concern about how to do the 1/2 inch gap in the front between Clam & Oyster company and the Launch Company.
I was also concerned about the signs as my Foss' Landing is on a river which is about 400 miles from the ocean and therefore there would be no clams or oysters. The sign on the side of the building however does not really advertise sales of clams or oysters but of fishing gear and boating equipment. The final details however with the crates of clams could be a problem. Will have to decide what to do with these.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13310 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/10/2003 :  3:42:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage
John,

I'm not sure this helps, but I asked my wife how our local fish market in NJ had some fish from New Zealand. Our fish market makes several trips into the NYC Fulton Fish market to resupply. How did they get to the Fulton Market?

But, that may be too much to explain, in your case. It was worth a try...

Chuck



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