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lv4142003
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/30/2005 :  3:04:54 PM  Show Profile
Back in August, I believe, Racedirector (Bruce) stated that he was thinking about doing an engine terminal diorama. Then Thom Creek & Western found a MR article from 1955 with a very neat engine terminal and scanned it onto this site. I was looking at the building and it looks virtually identical to the Revell engine house built by Al Armitage back when?? the late 60's?? I was wondering if Al used it as his inspiration or were small engine houses similar to that one that common? It is still one of the best looking plastic kits on the market. Joe Hueber <lv4142003>

Country: USA | Posts: 177

Thorn Creek and Western
Fireman



Posted - 10/30/2005 :  4:11:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Thorn Creek and Western's Homepage
Joe-
It's true that many old-time small enginhouses looked like that, but I've always believed that the article structure was indeed the inspiration for Al's. Of course, it's too late for us to ask Unca' AL, but he DID write an article in the September 1960 Model Railroader entitled, "Modifying the Revell Enginehouse- for longer locomotives." Perhaps your answer is in there.

BTW, Al's articles, "The Case for Styrene," in the November and December, 1959 MR's are essential reading.
-Dave


-Dave

Edited by - Thorn Creek and Western on 10/31/2005 12:59:37 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2456 Go to Top of Page

Thorn Creek and Western
Fireman



Posted - 10/30/2005 :  4:11:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Thorn Creek and Western's Homepage
Joe-
It's true that many old-time small enginhouses looked like that, but I've always believed that the article structure was indeed the inspiration for Al's. Of course, it's too late for us to ask Unca' AL, but he DID write an article in the September 1960 Model Railroader entitled, "Modifying the Revell Enginehouse- for longer locomotives." Perhaps your answer is in there.

BTW, Al's articles, "The Case for Styrene," in the November and December, 1959 MR's are essential reading.
-Dave


-Dave

Edited by - Thorn Creek and Western on 10/31/2005 12:59:37 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2456 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/30/2005 :  4:32:37 PM  Show Profile
What a coincidence! I just purchased about a half-dozen old MR issues, and the September 1960 issue was one of them. Al did a great job lengthening and superdetailing the Revel engine house in that article.


Country: USA | Posts: 31245 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/30/2005 :  4:32:37 PM  Show Profile
What a coincidence! I just purchased about a half-dozen old MR issues, and the September 1960 issue was one of them. Al did a great job lengthening and superdetailing the Revel engine house in that article.


Country: USA | Posts: 31245 Go to Top of Page

Thorn Creek and Western
Fireman



Posted - 10/30/2005 :  4:43:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit Thorn Creek and Western's Homepage
P.S.
The same basic kit was also issued as the 'Superior Bakery' and the 'Weekly Herald' by Revell. I just learned that Armitage wrote articles about each of these in the 1/2, 2001 and the 3/4, 2001 issues of the Narrow Guage and Shortline Gazette. I'll have to track those down myself.
-Dave


-Dave

Edited by - Thorn Creek and Western on 10/31/2005 01:08:29 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2456 Go to Top of Page

Thorn Creek and Western
Fireman



Posted - 10/30/2005 :  4:43:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit Thorn Creek and Western's Homepage
P.S.
The same basic kit was also issued as the 'Superior Bakery' and the 'Weekly Herald' by Revell. I just learned that Armitage wrote articles about each of these in the 1/2, 2001 and the 3/4, 2001 issues of the Narrow Guage and Shortline Gazette. I'll have to track those down myself.
-Dave


-Dave

Edited by - Thorn Creek and Western on 10/31/2005 01:08:29 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2456 Go to Top of Page

Darryl L Huffman
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/31/2005 :  01:11:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit Darryl L Huffman's Homepage
Al Armitage didn't need to copy anything. He was very creative. If anything, I would think his Engine House was a brick version of John Allen's engine house.

There may be someone left who was close friend of Al's who would know. But he would be getting pretty old by now.

Information like this might even be buried in one of Al's hundreds of articles for the Gazette. I believe he even designed the cover format for Bob Brown.



Country: USA | Posts: 252 Go to Top of Page

Darryl L Huffman
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/31/2005 :  01:11:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit Darryl L Huffman's Homepage
Al Armitage didn't need to copy anything. He was very creative. If anything, I would think his Engine House was a brick version of John Allen's engine house.

There may be someone left who was close friend of Al's who would know. But he would be getting pretty old by now.

Information like this might even be buried in one of Al's hundreds of articles for the Gazette. I believe he even designed the cover format for Bob Brown.



Country: USA | Posts: 252 Go to Top of Page

MP Rich
Fireman



Posted - 10/31/2005 :  10:10:58 AM  Show Profile
I think the use of roundhouses on layout is more a mental factor rather than true to prototype. If one is modeling somewhere in high traffic it is needed but if modeling much of the rest of the country it was not the normto have a roundhouse with ten-twenty stalls. Many of the small lines such as logging or industrial didn't even have ten engines let alone have them in the shop at the same time.
I find for my layout a small engine facility suits just fine and saves lots of real estate for operations.



Country: USA | Posts: 1762 Go to Top of Page

MP Rich
Fireman



Posted - 10/31/2005 :  10:10:58 AM  Show Profile
I think the use of roundhouses on layout is more a mental factor rather than true to prototype. If one is modeling somewhere in high traffic it is needed but if modeling much of the rest of the country it was not the normto have a roundhouse with ten-twenty stalls. Many of the small lines such as logging or industrial didn't even have ten engines let alone have them in the shop at the same time.
I find for my layout a small engine facility suits just fine and saves lots of real estate for operations.



Country: USA | Posts: 1762 Go to Top of Page

lv4142003
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/31/2005 :  10:22:39 AM  Show Profile
Darryl, I agree, Al Armitage didn't copy anyone, he was to creative. I was wondering if the same building was inspiration for him to design the building for Revell. There are a lot of similarities between the 2 buildings, the double windows in each bay, the arch of the bays, the round window over the doors, the small shop off the side. Regardless, it IS STILL one of the best plastic building kits ever on the market. The brick texture is outstanding, the window castings are some of the thinnest. The whole building just looks right. It would be nice to see more brick, inner city style buidings with the same worn texture available today.
Joe Hueber <lv4142003>



Country: USA | Posts: 177 Go to Top of Page

lv4142003
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/31/2005 :  10:22:39 AM  Show Profile
Darryl, I agree, Al Armitage didn't copy anyone, he was to creative. I was wondering if the same building was inspiration for him to design the building for Revell. There are a lot of similarities between the 2 buildings, the double windows in each bay, the arch of the bays, the round window over the doors, the small shop off the side. Regardless, it IS STILL one of the best plastic building kits ever on the market. The brick texture is outstanding, the window castings are some of the thinnest. The whole building just looks right. It would be nice to see more brick, inner city style buidings with the same worn texture available today.
Joe Hueber <lv4142003>



Country: USA | Posts: 177 Go to Top of Page

LVRALPH
Fireman



Posted - 10/31/2005 :  12:53:49 PM  Show Profile
Joey, You planning on modeling something? Squid.


Country: | Posts: 5584 Go to Top of Page

LVRALPH
Fireman



Posted - 10/31/2005 :  12:53:49 PM  Show Profile
Joey, You planning on modeling something? Squid.


Country: | Posts: 5584 Go to Top of Page
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