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slimrails
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/12/2005 :  8:44:23 PM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by acousticco

I have one Labelle kit that was less than impressive, (bare minimum of materials, missing parts, wrong scale parts, vague instructions). Is this common with Labelle kits? Because I'd sure like to build some of their passanger car kits.

I think that LaBelle kits are one of those kits that you have to buy two of to start: one to learn on and screw up and the other to actually build right and well. Once I saw where they were going with windows, doors, roof assembly etc. in one HOn3 kit, the others were the same. LaBelle kits are made from the same materials, use the same instructions, and include the same crude white metal castings today as they did 30+ years ago although the company was sold a couple of years back. Yeah, the grooves between the boards look too deep and out of scale making you sand the car sides down, and yeah, the kits are nothin' more than a box o' wood. But I've seen some really well done LaBelle kits over the years and they're really in a class of their own, good or bad. Here's a couple of the D&RGW prototype HOn3 LaBelle kits that I built for my Catskill & Ramapo.



Edited by - slimrails on 10/12/2005 8:49:47 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7552 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/12/2005 :  8:49:25 PM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Thorn Creek and Western

More of a cave man than you think, Russ, having been a member of the National Speleological Society for over thirty years!



OK, Dave, you sent me to Google on this one. I didn't make the connection to Spelunking until after I did the search.


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 25357 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/12/2005 :  8:49:25 PM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Thorn Creek and Western

More of a cave man than you think, Russ, having been a member of the National Speleological Society for over thirty years!



OK, Dave, you sent me to Google on this one. I didn't make the connection to Spelunking until after I did the search.


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 25357 Go to Top of Page

slimrails
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/12/2005 :  8:53:02 PM  Show Profile
Maybe Dave likes to hang out in caves like a ?


Country: USA | Posts: 7552 Go to Top of Page

slimrails
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/12/2005 :  8:53:02 PM  Show Profile
Maybe Dave likes to hang out in caves like a ?


Country: USA | Posts: 7552 Go to Top of Page

acousticco
Fireman



Posted - 10/12/2005 :  8:56:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit acousticco's Homepage
I had the HOn3 D&RGW caboose kit and all the brake and end details looked to be from an HO standard gauge kit. I also built a 2 in 1 flat car kit that was much better, but I still ended up swapping out some of the more coarse castings with Grandt Line parts. Junco scale models makes similar 'box of wood' kits that I quite like.

-Cody



Country: Canada | Posts: 1520 Go to Top of Page

acousticco
Fireman



Posted - 10/12/2005 :  8:56:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit acousticco's Homepage
I had the HOn3 D&RGW caboose kit and all the brake and end details looked to be from an HO standard gauge kit. I also built a 2 in 1 flat car kit that was much better, but I still ended up swapping out some of the more coarse castings with Grandt Line parts. Junco scale models makes similar 'box of wood' kits that I quite like.

-Cody



Country: Canada | Posts: 1520 Go to Top of Page

Thorn Creek and Western
Fireman



Posted - 10/12/2005 :  10:23:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Thorn Creek and Western's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman
OK, Dave, you sent me to Google on this one. I didn't make the connection to Spelunking until after I did the search.


Bruce-
A brief correction-- We cavers reserve the word 'Spelunking' for the actions of the idiots who enter caves armed only with one flashlight, a tee shirt, and tennis shoes. 'Spelunkers' are the jerks that we cavers, along with your local EMT's, are routinely called on to rescue.

We organized cavers are, hopefully, always well prepared with three sources of light and other equipment plus knowledge and training that lets us venture underground relatively safely.

If any of you are curious about the worlds under your feet please check out http://www.caves.org/
-Caver Dave


-Dave

Edited by - Thorn Creek and Western on 10/12/2005 10:37:04 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2451 Go to Top of Page

Thorn Creek and Western
Fireman



Posted - 10/12/2005 :  10:23:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Thorn Creek and Western's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman
OK, Dave, you sent me to Google on this one. I didn't make the connection to Spelunking until after I did the search.


Bruce-
A brief correction-- We cavers reserve the word 'Spelunking' for the actions of the idiots who enter caves armed only with one flashlight, a tee shirt, and tennis shoes. 'Spelunkers' are the jerks that we cavers, along with your local EMT's, are routinely called on to rescue.

We organized cavers are, hopefully, always well prepared with three sources of light and other equipment plus knowledge and training that lets us venture underground relatively safely.

If any of you are curious about the worlds under your feet please check out http://www.caves.org/
-Caver Dave


-Dave

Edited by - Thorn Creek and Western on 10/12/2005 10:37:04 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2451 Go to Top of Page

Rusty Stumps
Fireman



Posted - 10/12/2005 :  10:34:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Rusty Stumps's Homepage
I have a string of around seven LaBelle wooden 1890's cars I built, again, some 40 years ago. I recently got them out and refubished them then put them back in the boxes for prosperity I guess.


Walt


Country: USA | Posts: 6375 Go to Top of Page

Rusty Stumps
Fireman



Posted - 10/12/2005 :  10:34:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Rusty Stumps's Homepage
I have a string of around seven LaBelle wooden 1890's cars I built, again, some 40 years ago. I recently got them out and refubished them then put them back in the boxes for prosperity I guess.


Walt


Country: USA | Posts: 6375 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 10/13/2005 :  6:18:35 PM  Show Profile
Ah, good ol' Labelle. I have two of their 1890's open platform cars, both heavily kitbashed. One is the center door combine and the other is the business car. (Hey, even a 10 mile short line can have a business car.) Both of them were built 25 - 30 years ago, and both are still on the layout. In fact, other than my old PFM modern Ma & Pa 2-8-0, no DCC and sound equipped, the only thing older than the Labelle cars operating on the layout is . . . ME!


Country: USA | Posts: 2129 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 10/13/2005 :  6:18:35 PM  Show Profile
Ah, good ol' Labelle. I have two of their 1890's open platform cars, both heavily kitbashed. One is the center door combine and the other is the business car. (Hey, even a 10 mile short line can have a business car.) Both of them were built 25 - 30 years ago, and both are still on the layout. In fact, other than my old PFM modern Ma & Pa 2-8-0, no DCC and sound equipped, the only thing older than the Labelle cars operating on the layout is . . . ME!


Country: USA | Posts: 2129 Go to Top of Page

Archbar Jesse
New Hire

Posted - 10/20/2005 :  2:39:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Archbar Jesse's Homepage
I like old kits.

I recently found a couple from Timberline Scale Models, the Fairplay Church and a three-stall enginehouse. As I recall, Campbell later bought their line and re-engineered and re-released a few. These specimens were in a box of dusty random junk somebody traded in at my now-defunct LHS. The boxes were trashed, but fortunately all the parts (still in bags!) and instructions were there. The church looks good to go for the most part, but I'm pretty sure I'm going to ditch the metal window castings and replace 'em with Grandt/Tichy parts (pretty much SOP for me when building older kits, for example, certain Campbell kits with overly "quaint" detailingócute only works in very small doses) and build a new steeple and vestibule out of wood-- why they thought white metal was a good idea for these subassemblies is a mystery to me (footnote 1). The Enginehouse looks more like a three-stall roundhouse that got squared up at the corners, and the windows are terrible, but I think I can gussy it up so it looks right. Also gonna have to fix the ventilation louvers, which are replicated with scribed siding, an unacceptable shortcut.

It took me a while to get into Campbell kits, though Iíd always been partial to the plaid boxes and their neatly executed dioramas; the prices for new kits always seemed too high. Eventually I pulled a few together from forgotten corners of old hobby shops. Think I paid the 1972 MSRP for most of the complete kits; some were in a similar condition to the Timberline kits and I got Ďem for a song. A few wound up as donors for parts Ďcause the base structures just didnít hold up to the reality test (i.e., didnít look like any buildings Iíd seen outside of maybe Disneyland), but thatís okay when they were basically free. My Skull Valley Station is probably the best structure model Iíve ever built. I modified the Country Barn into a sort of livery stable (using the ďjailĒ portion of the Sheriffís Office as an office outbuilding). This one was a little disappointing due to the circular saw marks on the wall pieces. Iíve also got a mine kit (forgot the name, not the Red Mountain Mine, the other one) that I canít wait to give the chop shop treatment.

I really like Classic Miniatures as well. The Silver Plume Store was my first real structure kit. Built the Mount Princeton Station (footnote 2) and Grand Central mine on my desk in college. Have a marred and imperfect Fraternal Hall (looks like a previous custodian spilled a tube of Ambriod into the box) thatíll likely wind up as a donor. I have a semi-completed CM narrow guage tank car thatís an absolute gem, at the time I started it my modeling skills werenít quite up to snuff. Maybe Iíll revisit it someday, but the little people on my ca. 1900 pike donít use much gasoline. While Iím on CM, does anyone have a photograph or a review of the Union Brass Foundry? Looks neat, but Iím not throwing my money down for a kit depicted only by a sketchy line drawing. Not even the internet seems to know anything.

Built one LaBelle kit, the F&CC Tiffany reefer. First craftsman rolling stock kit I ever built, I was 13 or 14 at the time. You can imagine how that little experiment turned out . . . . Still have it anyway. Iíd like to build up a string of their passenger cars; I hear theyíre jewels. I think theyíd be more satisfying to me than the modified plastic kits currently serving as my passenger fleet.

Went to Bull Street Station in Savannah earlier this week, fingered a Gloor Craft general store and a blacksmith shop by Sequoia. Both were nice, but the price was a little too steep for me to bite. Too bad, both looked like superb little kits.

As you may have guessed, half the fun for me is fixing old strucuture kits so they jive with my idea of what looks right. I also tend to use instructions as a basic guideline and shorten or lengthen or adjust or rearrange until Iím happy. I havenít bought any of the newer superkits because most of them have at least one major flaw (as I see it) that is simply uncorrectable or would require too much effort to fixóIím comfortable with scratchbuilding, so whatever I want, I can make myself. Plus, even though I have enough money, Iím not buying any structure kit that costs me as much as a new Glock.

Footnote 1: I like metal castings for some applications, but I think itíd be too much work to get a major structural component depicted in potmetal parts to match/look right on a predominantly wooden structure. Sometimes it seems like kit designers use metal castings just for the sake of using metal castings. Sigh. Iíll just have to build me one out of wood.

And whatís with those Woodland Scenics all-metal structures? Yuck! I only ever bought the barbershop . . . suppressed the urge to vomit . . . used the parts as guides to scratchbuild a wooden copy. Whatís the point?

Footnote 2: Has anyone else noticed that this is the same station as the one on the cover of Terrapin Station? Not a real big Dead fan, but again, I did build this model in college. X-acto in one hand, bong in the other . . . .


"In capitalism, man exploits man. In communism, it's the other way around."

Country: USA | Posts: 14 Go to Top of Page

Archbar Jesse
New Hire

Posted - 10/20/2005 :  2:39:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Archbar Jesse's Homepage
I like old kits.

I recently found a couple from Timberline Scale Models, the Fairplay Church and a three-stall enginehouse. As I recall, Campbell later bought their line and re-engineered and re-released a few. These specimens were in a box of dusty random junk somebody traded in at my now-defunct LHS. The boxes were trashed, but fortunately all the parts (still in bags!) and instructions were there. The church looks good to go for the most part, but I'm pretty sure I'm going to ditch the metal window castings and replace 'em with Grandt/Tichy parts (pretty much SOP for me when building older kits, for example, certain Campbell kits with overly "quaint" detailingócute only works in very small doses) and build a new steeple and vestibule out of wood-- why they thought white metal was a good idea for these subassemblies is a mystery to me (footnote 1). The Enginehouse looks more like a three-stall roundhouse that got squared up at the corners, and the windows are terrible, but I think I can gussy it up so it looks right. Also gonna have to fix the ventilation louvers, which are replicated with scribed siding, an unacceptable shortcut.

It took me a while to get into Campbell kits, though Iíd always been partial to the plaid boxes and their neatly executed dioramas; the prices for new kits always seemed too high. Eventually I pulled a few together from forgotten corners of old hobby shops. Think I paid the 1972 MSRP for most of the complete kits; some were in a similar condition to the Timberline kits and I got Ďem for a song. A few wound up as donors for parts Ďcause the base structures just didnít hold up to the reality test (i.e., didnít look like any buildings Iíd seen outside of maybe Disneyland), but thatís okay when they were basically free. My Skull Valley Station is probably the best structure model Iíve ever built. I modified the Country Barn into a sort of livery stable (using the ďjailĒ portion of the Sheriffís Office as an office outbuilding). This one was a little disappointing due to the circular saw marks on the wall pieces. Iíve also got a mine kit (forgot the name, not the Red Mountain Mine, the other one) that I canít wait to give the chop shop treatment.

I really like Classic Miniatures as well. The Silver Plume Store was my first real structure kit. Built the Mount Princeton Station (footnote 2) and Grand Central mine on my desk in college. Have a marred and imperfect Fraternal Hall (looks like a previous custodian spilled a tube of Ambriod into the box) thatíll likely wind up as a donor. I have a semi-completed CM narrow guage tank car thatís an absolute gem, at the time I started it my modeling skills werenít quite up to snuff. Maybe Iíll revisit it someday, but the little people on my ca. 1900 pike donít use much gasoline. While Iím on CM, does anyone have a photograph or a review of the Union Brass Foundry? Looks neat, but Iím not throwing my money down for a kit depicted only by a sketchy line drawing. Not even the internet seems to know anything.

Built one LaBelle kit, the F&CC Tiffany reefer. First craftsman rolling stock kit I ever built, I was 13 or 14 at the time. You can imagine how that little experiment turned out . . . . Still have it anyway. Iíd like to build up a string of their passenger cars; I hear theyíre jewels. I think theyíd be more satisfying to me than the modified plastic kits currently serving as my passenger fleet.

Went to Bull Street Station in Savannah earlier this week, fingered a Gloor Craft general store and a blacksmith shop by Sequoia. Both were nice, but the price was a little too steep for me to bite. Too bad, both looked like superb little kits.

As you may have guessed, half the fun for me is fixing old strucuture kits so they jive with my idea of what looks right. I also tend to use instructions as a basic guideline and shorten or lengthen or adjust or rearrange until Iím happy. I havenít bought any of the newer superkits because most of them have at least one major flaw (as I see it) that is simply uncorrectable or would require too much effort to fixóIím comfortable with scratchbuilding, so whatever I want, I can make myself. Plus, even though I have enough money, Iím not buying any structure kit that costs me as much as a new Glock.

Footnote 1: I like metal castings for some applications, but I think itíd be too much work to get a major structural component depicted in potmetal parts to match/look right on a predominantly wooden structure. Sometimes it seems like kit designers use metal castings just for the sake of using metal castings. Sigh. Iíll just have to build me one out of wood.

And whatís with those Woodland Scenics all-metal structures? Yuck! I only ever bought the barbershop . . . suppressed the urge to vomit . . . used the parts as guides to scratchbuild a wooden copy. Whatís the point?

Footnote 2: Has anyone else noticed that this is the same station as the one on the cover of Terrapin Station? Not a real big Dead fan, but again, I did build this model in college. X-acto in one hand, bong in the other . . . .


"In capitalism, man exploits man. In communism, it's the other way around."

Country: USA | Posts: 14 Go to Top of Page
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