Railroad Line Forums
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 0 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 201 ]  [ Total: 201 ]  [ Newest Member: motors ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Early Rail Forum
 Bitter Creek Models HO kits

Note: You must be registered in order to post a reply.
To register, click here. Registration is FREE!

 Posting Form
Screensize:
UserName:
Password:
Format Mode:
Format: BoldItalicizedUnderlineStrikethrough Align LeftCenteredAlign Right Horizontal Rule Insert HyperlinkInsert EmailInsert Image Insert CodeInsert QuoteInsert List Spell Checker
   
Callouts: Insert Speech Icon: duh! Insert Speech Icon: oops! Insert Speech Icon: sigh! Insert Speech Icon: ugh! Insert Speech Icon: wow! Insert Speech Icon: yeah! Insert Speech Icon: ok! Insert Speech Icon: yes! Insert Speech Icon: no!
Message Icon:              
             


Smilies
Alien_125 [:-alien] Angel_125 [:-angel] Angry [:(!] Apple_125 [:-apple]
Approve [^] Ashamed_125 [:-ashamed] Banghead_125 [:-banghead] Baseball_125 [:-baseball]
Basketball_125 [:-basketball] Batman_125 [:-batman] Big Smile [:D] Bigeyes_125 [:-bigeyes]
Bigeyes2_125 [:-bigeyes2] Bigmouth_125 [:-bigmouth] Black Eye [B)] Blindfold_125 [:-blindfold]
Blush [:I] Boggled_125 [:-boggled] Boring_125 [:-boring] Bouncy_125 [:-bouncy]
Brokenheart_125 [:-brokenheart] Bulb_125 [:-bulb] Bunny_125 [:-bunny] Captain_125 [:-captain]
Censored_125 [:-censored] Chef_125 [:-chef] Clock_125 [:-clock] clover_125 [:-clover]
Clown [:o)] clown_125 [:-clown] Cold_125 [:-cold] Cool [8D]
Cowboy_125 [:-cowboy] Crazy_125 [:-crazy] Cry_125 [:-cry] Cyclops_125 [:-cyclops]
Dead [xx(] Devil_125 [:-devil] Disapprove [V] Disguise_125 [:-disguise]
Dog_125 [:-dog] Doggy_125 [:-doggy] Dopey_125 [:-dopey] Drool_125 [:-drool]
Drunk_125 [:-drunk] Dunce_125 [:-dunce] Eight Ball [8] Evil [}:)]
Eyebrows_125 [:-eyebrows] Fight_125 [:-fight] Football_125 [:-football] Ghost_125 [:-ghost]
Glasses_125 [:-glasses] Gnasher_125 [:-gnasher] Goldfish_125 [:-goldfish] Golf_125 [:-golf]
Graduate_125 [:-graduate] Grumpy_125 [:-grumpy] Headache_125 [:-headache] Headphones_125 [:-headphones]
Hearts_125 [:-hearts] Hockey_125 [:-hockey] Hot_125 [:-hot] Hypnotized_125 [:-hypnotized]
Idea_125 [:-idea] Indifferent_125 [:-indifferent] Irked_125 [:-irked] Jester_125 [:-jester]
Jump_125 [:-jump] Jump2_125 [:-jump2] jumprefect_125 [:-jumprefect] King_125 [:-king]
Kisses [:X] Kitty_125 [:-kitty] Knockout_125 [:-knockout] Love_125 [:-love]
Magnify_125 [:-magnify] Masked_125 [:-masked] Mean_125 [:-mean] Mischievous_125 [:-mischievous]
Mohawk_125 [:-mohawk] Moptop_125 [:-moptop] Mouse_125 [:-mouse] Mummy_125 [:-mummy]
Nonono_125 [:-nonono] Ouch_125 [:-ouch] Paperbag_125 [:-paperbag] Party_125 [:-party]
Piggy_125 [:-piggy] Pirate_125 [:-pirate] Propeller_125 [:-propeller] Psst_125 [:-psst]
Pumpkin_125 [:-pumpkin] Question [?] Sad [:(] Scared_125 [:-scared]
Shades_125 [:-shades] Shake_125 [:-shake] Shock [:O] Shy [8)]
Sick_125 [:-sick] Sing_125 [:-sing] Skull_125 [:-skull] Slaphappy_125 [:-slaphappy]
Sleep_125 [:-sleep] Sleepy [|)] Slug_125 [:-slug] Sly_125 [:-sly]
Smgreen_125 [:-smile_green] Smile [:)] Smirk_125 [:-smirk] Snooty_125 [:-snooty]
Snorkel_125 [:-snorkel] soccer_125 [:-soccer] Sonar_125 [:-sonar] Sour_125 [:-sour]
Spin_125 [:-spin] Splat_125 [:-splat] Star_125 [:-star] Tapedshut_125 [:-tophat]
Tapedshut_125 [:-taped] Thumbdn_125 [:-thumbd] Thumbup_125 [:-thumbu] Tiger_125 [:-tiger]
Timebomb_125 [:-timebm] Toast_125 [:-toast] Tongue [:P] Tongue_125 [:-tong2]
Tophat_125 [:-tophat] Turtle_125 [:-turtle] Vampire_125 [:-vamp] Viking_125 [:-viking]
Weeping_125 [:-weepn] Williamtell_125 [:-wiltel] Wink [;)] Witch_125 [:-witch]
Xmas_125 [;-xmas] Yawn_125 [:-yawn] Yuck_125 [:-yuck]  

   -  HTML is OFF | Forum Code is ON
   Insert a File
 
  Check here to include your profile signature.
Check here to subscribe to this topic.
    

T O P I C    R E V I E W
masonamerican Posted - 04/14/2015 : 3:21:31 PM
Hi Guys,
I just finished, well nearly finished as there still is some weathering to do, a Bitter Creek Models boxcar kit. It's their new Generic boxcar K-24 which as it is generic I have lettered for my home road. When looking at the photos I have seen things to improve (isn't there always) so you freight car connoisseurs can give me your worst. It was a great kit to assemble and they use laser board for the sides and roof and for the roof walk instead of laser cut wood. I think in my opinion at least that it gives a neater appearance.

I'm also working on their gondola kit which I hope to have ready soon. Its quite a large car and the underside gave me some headache getting the brake gear in place but I found a way that felt likely.

Thanks for looking,
Håkan





15   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
deemery Posted - 11/24/2016 : 10:43:20 PM
Even when the roofwalk was painted, it got a lot of wear-and-tear and would often look lighter colored than the rest of the roof.

dave
Michael Hohn Posted - 11/24/2016 : 2:59:32 PM
Manny,

No. Here's where I built one of the boxcars: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=43866&whichpage=11

Hope this helps.

Mike
SAFN SAAP Posted - 11/24/2016 : 2:38:37 PM
Hey Y'all,

I'm interested in the Bitter Creek Models car kits. I heard from someone that the pieces are peel and stick. Is that true/correct?

Thanks,

Manny
CavalryTrooper25 Posted - 11/02/2015 : 10:30:06 AM
That is a beautiful car!

So, would you like to interchange a PRR XA (built from a BTS kit by me), for one of yours like the above?

That would look really great sitting in my yard (as I do not have a full layout yet.)

Horse

Michael Hohn Posted - 06/07/2015 : 6:40:25 PM
I noticed today that Bitter Creek Models now has information about their rolling stock kits here: http://bittercreekmodels.com/page3.html

Mike

CavalryTrooper25 Posted - 04/19/2015 : 8:57:57 PM
quote:
Originally posted by railman28

Just a small clarification in what I wrote. When I write the 70's mid 80's I talking the 1870's and 1880's I don't comment on or do much research on anything in the 20th century.
Also, because my model is set in the west I center my research on practice there under the neighborhood Theory which is people have a tendency to copy their neighbors. When I look east it in generalities. I'm looking for color and styles trends only.



Point taken!

Thanks

Horse

railman28 Posted - 04/18/2015 : 1:04:43 PM
Just a small clarification in what I wrote. When I write the 70's mid 80's I talking the 1870's and 1880's I don't comment on or do much research on anything in the 20th century.
Also, because my model is set in the west I center my research on practice there under the neighborhood Theory which is people have a tendency to copy their neighbors. When I look east it in generalities. I'm looking for color and styles trends only.
CavalryTrooper25 Posted - 04/17/2015 : 10:25:19 AM
quote:
Originally posted by railman28

quote:
Originally posted by CavalryTrooper25

Sven;

Not a criticism, just an fyi, everything I have read in the last couple years suggests that the roofwalks were not painted at all. This is because paint at this timeframe was high gloss only, so when it got wet, or snowy, it got slippery as all get out. As a result brakemen moving on top of cars were more likely to slip, and fall off, so the roofwalks were left unpainted for better traction. Flat paint as we know it today is really a post WWII innovation. Even into the early 60s, the U.S. military still used a semi gloss paint on vehicles, and field equipment, which was the closest to flat they could get. True flat paint did not come into general use until the late 60s.

Horse





but we still need to use flat paint on our model for scaling because even glossy paint doesn't look glossy from 200 feet. By the late 60's on the west coast roof walks were being painted. They would throw sand into the wet paint not only on the walkways but on the whole roof to help the brakeman's traction. They called it sanding.



Bob;

I don't disagree, as most of the model paints available in matching colors are flat, with some notable exceptions. Besides, even gloss paint will fade/flatten in weather. My point was about new paint, on new cars, and in particular application of that paint on the wooden roofwalks. I don't recall where I read it, but there was mention of some new cars built by PRR at the Altoona Car shops in the 1880s, getting their class photo taken, and the caption specifically mentions that the roofwalks were painted for the picture, and as soon as the pic had been taken, the painted roofwalks were removed, and replaced with unpainted wood, "for safety reasons".

As to roofwalks in the 60s, most by then were steel, and many were the open grate style, so traction was much less of an issue. However, I do agree that the wooden roofwalks of that later time period, even in the 50s probably had the safety tread paint, IE sand added. IIRC 3M began offering that in the early 50s, as my maternal grandfather referenced it in his diary when the floor in his lab was repainted over the two week summer shutdown. It was battleship grey paint, with "grit" mixed in for safety traction. It is funny what you learn reading old diaries.

Horse

Michael Hohn Posted - 04/16/2015 : 5:42:55 PM
I can remember the discussion on painted/unpainted/sanded roof walks several years ago. I did a search and it seems to have started with message 33188. There might be more than one discussion and I'm not sure anything was resolved.

Mike
masonamerican Posted - 04/16/2015 : 4:36:28 PM
quote:
Originally posted by CavalryTrooper25

Sven;

Not a criticism, just an fyi, everything I have read in the last couple years suggests that the roofwalks were not painted at all. This is because paint at this timeframe was high gloss only, so when it got wet, or snowy, it got slippery as all get out. As a result brakemen moving on top of cars were more likely to slip, and fall off, so the roofwalks were left unpainted for better traction. Flat paint as we know it today is really a post WWII innovation. Even into the early 60s, the U.S. military still used a semi gloss paint on vehicles, and field equipment, which was the closest to flat they could get. True flat paint did not come into general use until the late 60s.

Horse





Thanks for the input. When you mention it I have read about that on the Early rail forum.
We will see, either I repaint it weathered wood or I go with the option that the railroads shop who built the car put sand in the paint.

Håkan
railman28 Posted - 04/16/2015 : 2:43:35 PM
quote:
Originally posted by CavalryTrooper25

Sven;

Not a criticism, just an fyi, everything I have read in the last couple years suggests that the roofwalks were not painted at all. This is because paint at this timeframe was high gloss only, so when it got wet, or snowy, it got slippery as all get out. As a result brakemen moving on top of cars were more likely to slip, and fall off, so the roofwalks were left unpainted for better traction. Flat paint as we know it today is really a post WWII innovation. Even into the early 60s, the U.S. military still used a semi gloss paint on vehicles, and field equipment, which was the closest to flat they could get. True flat paint did not come into general use until the late 60s.

Horse





but we still need to use flat paint on our model for scaling because even glossy paint doesn't look glossy from 200 feet. By the late 60's on the west coast roof walks were being painted. They would throw sand into the wet paint not only on the walkways but on the whole roof to help the brakeman's traction. They called it sanding.
CavalryTrooper25 Posted - 04/16/2015 : 2:23:04 PM
Sven;

Not a criticism, just an fyi, everything I have read in the last couple years suggests that the roofwalks were not painted at all. This is because paint at this timeframe was high gloss only, so when it got wet, or snowy, it got slippery as all get out. As a result brakemen moving on top of cars were more likely to slip, and fall off, so the roofwalks were left unpainted for better traction. Flat paint as we know it today is really a post WWII innovation. Even into the early 60s, the U.S. military still used a semi gloss paint on vehicles, and field equipment, which was the closest to flat they could get. True flat paint did not come into general use until the late 60s.

Horse

masonamerican Posted - 04/15/2015 : 5:21:42 PM
Thanks Mike!
Michael Hohn Posted - 04/15/2015 : 5:11:16 PM
Thank you. Looks nice from every angle.

Mike
masonamerican Posted - 04/15/2015 : 12:41:38 PM
Probably a big splash

Here is a photo of the roof. The car is 31mm over the sides and 32mm from the bottom of the frame to the top of the roof walk.



Håkan

Railroad Line Forums © 2000-2020 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.22 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000