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L&IN photos.

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Printed on: 06/16/2019

Topic:


Topic author: INRAIL
Subject: L&IN photos.
Posted on: 05/22/2011 4:39:41 PM
Message:

Here are two L&IN GP35's pulling a cut of TP&W covered hoppers through Bruce Lake and past the Farm Bureau Coop Elevator. They were pulled from Delong Elevator a few miles up the line and are heading back to the TP&W interchange at Logansport, Indiana. More photos will be added in the future. Tom Johnson







Replies:


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/22/2011 6:17:53 PM
Message:

Nice shots, Tom.


Reply author: Tyson Rayles
Replied on: 05/22/2011 6:58:31 PM
Message:


Reply author: jbvb
Replied on: 05/22/2011 9:25:43 PM
Message:

Nice. I did wonder why you shot the trailing unit in two of the pictures, rather than the lead as most railfans would.


Reply author: MarkF
Replied on: 05/22/2011 9:46:50 PM
Message:

Great shots Tom! Very inspirational scenes. I always enjoy staring at your detailing and weathering.


Reply author: dallas_m
Replied on: 05/22/2011 10:01:39 PM
Message:

Beautiful! You do so much, so well ... consistently amazing.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/22/2011 11:07:38 PM
Message:

James. I'm just not fast enough with my camera! LOL!!!!!

Bruce, Mike, Mark, and Dallas, thanks guys for the kind words. I'll be adding more soon. :o)


Reply author: HobbyDr
Replied on: 05/23/2011 01:12:11 AM
Message:

Excuse me a second while I find my jaw, it's somewhere on the floor. As always, you never fail to astound. Well, gotta go, gonna stop at Thomas' for a 7-UP.

Don


Reply author: brakie
Replied on: 05/23/2011 10:40:31 AM
Message:

Tom,I like the L&IN far better then the PRR..

Of course that's from a guy that likes shortlines..


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/23/2011 7:52:00 PM
Message:

Larry, Believe me, I do too. I knew that I was making a mistake all along but didn't want to admit it. I love freelancing and modeling a shortline. I also really like the 80's. Anytime in the 80's. Also like the 90's too but during the 80's, I had a real prototype railroad about a mile away from my house. It was Chessie/CSX but was all abandoned in the early 90's. :o( We need to get together sometime. I'm not far from Ohio and you're not far from Indiana. :o)

Don. You can always stop by and get a "real" bottle of pop whenever you're passing through Indiana. Florida is a long ways. My brother in law lives in Ridge Manor off of 75 near Brooksville.

Thanks for the kind words guys.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/23/2011 8:15:24 PM
Message:

More TPW hoppers this time spotted at the Farm Bureau Elevator in Bruce Lake.



A pair of L&IN GP35's are pulling up beside the Farm Bureau elevator to stop and grab a bottle of pop and a snack from Bruce Lake Grocery.



Here are more photos of the TPW cut of hoppers with the lead unit in view. Better pics compared to the first few.





A shot of Bruce Lake Grocery where guys like to hang out on a warm sunny autumn day. The pop hits the spot.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/23/2011 8:35:07 PM
Message:

One more shot of the Farm Bureau Coop Elevator with the hoppers removed.


Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 05/24/2011 08:43:08 AM
Message:

Tom excellent as usual, I really like the weathering on those GP35's, thatecond shot is great.mh


Reply author: jschumaker
Replied on: 05/24/2011 10:47:13 AM
Message:

Great photos. Beautiful models.

Jeff S.


Reply author: bitlerisvj
Replied on: 05/25/2011 11:38:10 AM
Message:

Hi Tom, I just can't get over the way you paint, detail, and weather everything just the right amount. And especially the way it all fits together, just like you pulled it off of a photograph take in real life. I really do enjoy looking at your work.
Regards Vic Bitleris


Reply author: Mike Hamer
Replied on: 05/25/2011 11:56:53 AM
Message:

Hi Tom, so great to see more pics from your layout. I never tire seeing your gorgeous handiwork on the shelf layout of yours. Nice to see the shortline back up in operations as well!


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/28/2011 12:06:43 AM
Message:

More L&IN pics of Bruce Lake and Farm Bureau Coop Elevator. Notice the leaves along the edge of the road. A new detail I added. They actually have the shape of leaves. The right color too! A new Scenic Express item.









A PC/Conrail covered hopper spotted at Delong Elevator.







The scale house for Delong Elevator.



That's it for now. Will add a few more at another location soon. Tom Johnson


Reply author: deemery
Replied on: 05/28/2011 12:27:09 AM
Message:

Nicely done! The colors and weathering hang together across the scene.

dave


Reply author: Jordan114
Replied on: 05/28/2011 01:18:25 AM
Message:

Tom,

Your modeling is remarkable!! I love your scenery!

How many elevators are on the layout?

Jordan

Appalachian, Greenbriar & Southern Rwy
"The Black Diamond Speedway"


Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 05/28/2011 09:05:31 AM
Message:

Tom, nice work, yours is always an inspiration. Don't be afraid to scatter some leaves along the right of way, they always get blown there. mike h.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/29/2011 12:43:25 AM
Message:

Dave. Thanks! I try to keep my autumn colors toned down. :o)

Jordan. I have 4 elevators and 3 fertilizer facilities. I did have a 5th elevator but I took it out and replaced it with a Ready Mix cement plant. Thanks! :o)

Mike. Yes, I agree. I'm adding leaves along the right of way here and there. I'm not doing it everywhere but just enough to create the illusion that it is everywhere. I ran out of leaves and need to get more from Scenic Express. Thanks! :o)


Reply author: jon grant 4472
Replied on: 05/29/2011 07:40:05 AM
Message:

Hi Tom
I love the weathering on the hoppers - really nicely done. I'm also going for an autumnal/fall look and I'll have to get myself some 'fallen leaves' Which ones do you prefer?

Jon


Reply author: MarkF
Replied on: 05/29/2011 12:52:37 PM
Message:

Tom, I never tire of looking at your layout. I think Dave said it best; your weathering ties everything together. For example, in that last picture, the way you weathered the RR crossing sign is perfect, and it blends in with everything else. Everything just looks like it belongs there. You have a great eye!


Reply author: MikeFisher
Replied on: 05/29/2011 1:00:49 PM
Message:

Wonderful work, super craftsmanship plus an eye for realism and colors. The cutesy stuff gets old fast, but realistic work like yours never does.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/29/2011 9:43:36 PM
Message:

Jon. I used the Silfor Leaf Flake Foliage. It is attached to a fine polyester support. I rub my finger and thumb over the polyester support and the leaves just fall off. The flakes are actual 5 lobed leaves. I take the loose leaves and apply them along edges of roads, under trees, around sturctures, and along some of my track. I use water/detergent to wet them down. I use an eye dropper as a spray bottle would blow them away. I then add the usual white glue and water mix. They come in different colors. They are just a bit large in size but look very nice. The look far exceeds the slightly larger size IMO. If you have catalog issue number 15, the material is on page 19.

Mark and Mike. Thanks guys! Much appreciated. Being a retired art teacher, I'm always thinking creatively. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don't. If they don't, I just keep working at it until I'm happy. :o)


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/30/2011 12:17:46 AM
Message:

Here is a close up of those leaves taken with my iPhone.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 05/30/2011 12:19:36 AM
Message:

Woops! That's not the photo I wanted. Oh well, you can see the leaves OK. Good enough. :o)


Reply author: jon grant 4472
Replied on: 05/30/2011 05:03:18 AM
Message:

Thanks Tom.

I just realised I have 2 bags of the Silflor loose leaves (maple-leaf shape). I bought them unmarked from a swapmeet for pennies. Now I can see what they are.

Jon


Reply author: akimmons
Replied on: 05/31/2011 1:59:08 PM
Message:

Tom,
It's great to see you modeling the L&IN again. You will always be a shortline guy to me. Thanks for the great pics!


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/01/2011 01:08:57 AM
Message:

Here is a string of former PC covered hoppers now patched for the L&IN railroad. I have these and several other L&IN and other weathered covered hoppers on My Patched Erie Western hoppers thread. I wanted to keep this one more to layout shots and not rolling stock. I am adding covered hopper photos on a regular basis to the other thread.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: MLW
Replied on: 06/02/2011 12:02:34 PM
Message:

Don't know what to say that has not been said before.

It's simply amazing. The overall look and the attention to details (without flooding the layout with it) is right on the money.

Your rolling stock and loco are well done (weathering/patch job)

Your scenery is life-like.

Thanks for sharing all this Tom

Syl


Reply author: Mike Kieran
Replied on: 06/03/2011 9:07:50 PM
Message:

Hey Tom,
I always look forward to pictures of the Logansport & Indiana Northern since I first saw your layout in RMC years ago and I'm never disappointed. Great work.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/08/2011 12:15:32 AM
Message:

Next up, a visit to Kewanna, IN and Kewanna Elevator. You'll notice that I haven't added the L&IN signs to the depot yet. Following this set of photo's will be some of the updates to my depots and crossbucks. I'll post them a bit later.
Tom Johnson





















L&IN (PC) hoppers before they were patched. They're all patched now. Photos of them on my other thread on patched erie western hoppers.




That's it on Kewanna Elevator and Kewanna, IN


Reply author: brakie
Replied on: 06/08/2011 11:01:33 AM
Message:

Tom,Great modeling as usual..

I really love the way that station has stood against time and progress..

I can picture a railroad historical group or perhaps a model railroad club using that station after they refurbish it..

Wonderful!


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/08/2011 4:42:30 PM
Message:

Larry. Yes, the former PRR station in Kewanna has been kept up by the L&IN and recently received a fresh coat of paint and new shades before adding the new signs. I also have one that is in need of paint and work. This one is in Grass Creek. It received the new signs without a coat of paint. The interior was cleaned up and new shades added to the windows. The old ones were a mess. (GRIN) Thanks!




Reply author: Ray Schofield
Replied on: 06/19/2011 9:09:57 PM
Message:

Tom Love your layout and pictures, but find the shots of your roads disappearing into the backdrop or should I say continuing into the backdrop still amaze me. Thanks for sharing your talents with us
Ray

PS found this post through the Atlas SPF. Thanks for mentioning it.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/20/2011 12:29:47 AM
Message:

You're welcome Ray. You need to post some of Neil's work here on RR Line Forum's. His modeling will impress everyone here for sure. He learned from a great modeler. His dad! :o)


Reply author: rutlandfan
Replied on: 06/20/2011 11:11:11 AM
Message:

Inrail: Love the details on the station like the oil tanks. Such an overlooked detail, but spot on when done. Excellent Job.

Phil


Reply author: Ray Schofield
Replied on: 06/20/2011 11:13:51 AM
Message:

Thanks Tom,
I know Neil is viewing your posts so he can post his own photos, I get yelled at when I post them ha ha. Not really, but he remarks about your posts quite often, but doesn't post just lurking. So keep posting, maybe we can get him to post his own. By the way love the engine facility scene. The family of the four axle EMDs certainly look very realistic.
Thanks
Ray


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/24/2011 6:33:46 PM
Message:

Now we move on to yet another elevator along the L&IN. This one is another Farm Bureau CO-OP in Lucerne, IN. I believe the real elevator in Lucerne was a Hubbard Feeds and then became a Kent Feeds elevator. The reason I chose Farm Bureau is it just simply screams Indiana. Lots of these elevators in Indiana during most of the 50's, 60's, 70's and on up to the 90's before the name changed. They have different names today.


















Man, I've got to add some steps under that door or someone is going to get hurt! LOL!!! Sometimes you don't discover things until you look at photos of your layout. Tom Johnson


Reply author: Ray Schofield
Replied on: 06/24/2011 7:26:50 PM
Message:

Tom
Love the Co op building. Still love the road / backdrops. I guess my only complaint, not critism is being an Eastern boy I prefer Alco to EMD, but your detailing and weathering even make the EMDs look good. I guess that decision has been discussed and the decision is made. Keep posting I will just have to get used to the EMDs.
Thanks for sharing
Ray


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/24/2011 9:22:50 PM
Message:

Hi Ray!

LOL!!!!!!! You keep on making suggestions. I love suggestions and always will listen to any advice. Now, as for the Alco's. I LOVE Alco's. They are my favorite engines actually. My two favorites are the RS2 (Kato) and the Atlas C420. I have two undec Kato RS2's and 4 Atlas undec C420's. Two of them are low nose with a nose light and two are high hood. They will be painted shortly so hang in there and you'll soon see them in operation on the L&IN. Alco rules!!!!!!! :o) Thanks Ray!

Tom


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/25/2011 6:14:20 PM
Message:

This is the IH dealer in downtown Kewanna. It really did exist in Kewanna by the tracks.







I changed the crossbucks a bit to show a more "family" theme to the railroad with the addition of the L&IN sign. I also added the concrete base with the spiral stripe. The HC Sinclair structure is actually an antique shop. This is what most of the older structures here in Indiana has become in later years. There are antique shops everywhere around here. Many down town areas in small towns are just about all antique shops now a days. Tom Johnson


Reply author: Ray Schofield
Replied on: 06/26/2011 1:08:08 PM
Message:

Tom
More great work. I know this is no revelation, but looking at your work especially the structures, how subdued the colors are. Knowing you are an artist and art teacher this question may seem basic, but what do use for paints and do you do color mixing of the base color to get the subdued affect or is it all weathering after the fact.
Thanks
Ray


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 06/26/2011 6:48:01 PM
Message:

Ray. I'm very careful in the colors of fine foam turf I choose as well as the Silfor Prairie Tufts. When I print my backdrops, I tone down the colors a bit in my photoshop. Yes, fall colors can be bright but I think some modelers get them too bright where they stand out too much. My signs on structures are all toned down in photoshop. I also mix oil paints together and dry brush the ground cover and often even the bottom edges of the photo backdrops to blend the two together. This is how I'm able to blend my modeled roads into the roads on the photo backdrops. I actually paint the modeled road and using the same colors add a bit of paint on the bottom edge of the photo and blend it out as I go up the photo. I'm sure you've seen some photos of layouts where the ground cover is a brighter shade of green and all of a sudden, the backdrop color suddenly drops off to something more dull. I always paint my modeled scenery an inch or two in front of the backdrop with mixed oil colors to match the photo. Like I said above, if I have problems matching the two, I just simply cheat and paint the bottom half of the photo backdrop. :o)

Here is an example of changing the green shades in scenery. If you want a darker shade of green, add its complimentary color or opposite color on the color wheel which is red. A small amount of red will give you a dark green. Adding black will do the same but can give you a very cold shade of green. Add some yellow or white to get a brighter or lighter shade for sunlight areas. Add some brown to subdue the green or gray it up a bit so its not too bright. Practice mixing colors and take notes. Hope this helps. Tom

Tom


Reply author: Ray Schofield
Replied on: 06/27/2011 12:50:14 AM
Message:

Thanks Tom
What about your buildings? I know when I paint buildings they look to bright. Probably the colors are just too bright. Your suggestion on toning down colors should work for builings too. I need to take some art lessons. Just adding black or white is not always, if ever the answer.
Thanks
Ray


Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 06/27/2011 09:26:46 AM
Message:

Tom, fantastic photos, when ever I see your photos it looks like it could be taken in any rural area. I swear I've seen those scenes all through out upstate N.Y.mike h.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/01/2011 9:29:43 PM
Message:

Here is the Farm Bureau Co-op fertilizer facility in Lucerne, IN just down the spur from the FB Co-op Elevator. This is one of three fertilizer facilities on my railroad. The other two will follow shortly. Tom Johnson









Here is a close up where you can see the conduit and all moving through the breaker box, operating switches, and then to the auger motor. You can even see the conduit going up the conveyor to the motor at the top. I copied all of this exactly from a similar fertilizer facility in Rochester, Indiana.




Another close up of the electrical conduit and associated detail.




The scales and pump house.



Jim Six took this photo and photoshopped the sky into the photo for an interesting picture.


Reply author: Red P
Replied on: 07/01/2011 11:27:36 PM
Message:

Pictures look great.
P


Reply author: HW
Replied on: 07/02/2011 01:59:03 AM
Message:

Tom-
I always enjoy your work. It's like I'm on a 1/87 holiday. Thanks for sharing.


Reply author: MLW
Replied on: 07/02/2011 10:19:02 AM
Message:

As usual: Superb modeling and photography

Thanks for sharing. Greatly appreciate it.


Reply author: brakie
Replied on: 07/02/2011 11:00:03 AM
Message:

Tom,Top notch modeling as usual.

IMHO that scale and scale house steals the scene.


Thanks for sharing.


Reply author: Ray Schofield
Replied on: 07/08/2011 11:44:45 PM
Message:

Thanks Tom for sharing more great modeling
Ray


Reply author: Frederic Testard
Replied on: 07/09/2011 05:09:37 AM
Message:

Great work, Tom. I always love watching your models.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/10/2011 5:58:11 PM
Message:

Country stores along the L&IN. This one is in Verona, Indiana.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/10/2011 6:00:07 PM
Message:

Country Store in Grass Creek, Indiana.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/10/2011 6:23:44 PM
Message:

Country store in Bruce Lake, Indiana.



As I've said many times before, you could still see the old gas pumps, pop machines, and signs in small rural farm towns in the 1980's just the same as the 1960's. I will however change just a few pop machines soon with my scratch built 70's and 80's style models and perhaps a couple of new 70's era gas pumps. Signs don't have to change at all. Tom Johnson


Reply author: MarkF
Replied on: 07/11/2011 12:50:17 AM
Message:

I always enjoy your country store scenes Tom. Very inspiring!


Reply author: Dreamweaver
Replied on: 07/11/2011 01:03:14 AM
Message:

HI Tom.

I never get tired of looking at your masterpieces. Simply amazing my Friend.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/11/2011 02:39:16 AM
Message:

MarkF and Dreamweaver. Thanks guys for the kind words. I actually posted the three pictures of my stores in trying to help Quintin post his pictures. I was working with him over the phone trying to help him post a larger picture. I use a Mac and he uses a PC so that was sort of a problem but it looks like he solved the problem with Rick's help.

Quintin also models the INRAIL system with me. My division is the L&IN and Quintin's is the M&IN. Quintin models closer to 1990 where I model 1984 with early INRAIL. Most of my power is in the L&IN paint scheme. If I have anything in INRAIL, it will usually be a patch job in my era. Quintin uses more corporate INRAIL paint schemes on his later version of INRAIL. He also has several locos in his M&IN scheme too with a few of those patched. Just a brief history. :o)


Reply author: nhguy
Replied on: 07/11/2011 2:15:51 PM
Message:

Sounds like the McClelland, Koester, King railroads that merged to form the Appalachian Lines. I like the concept. The photos of the railroad are great. You've done a great job on it and the rolling stock and gives inspiration to those that view it. Your friends M&IN railroad is pretty nice to.


Reply author: Tyson Rayles
Replied on: 07/11/2011 3:24:27 PM
Message:


Reply author: Danny Head
Replied on: 07/13/2011 1:35:51 PM
Message:

Outstanding! I could look at this thread for days!


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/26/2011 5:35:35 PM
Message:

I want to go back to the fertilizer part of this thread. I posted some photos above (previous page) of my Farm Bureau Coop fertilizer facility in Lucerne, IN. Here are the other two fertilizer facilities on the L&IN. First one up is Sadler Fertilizer in Delong, IN.





Here is the other Farm Bureau Coop fertilizer facility that goes with the FBC elevator at Bruce Lake, IN.







I've replaced several details like pop machines and a few gas pumps along with a few minor "other" details to better reflect the mid 80's. Pictures with these added details will follow soon. Tom Johnson


Reply author: Indiana Midland
Replied on: 07/26/2011 8:40:31 PM
Message:

Tom,
Great work as always. Whose vertical tanks are you using at the fertilizer facility?

Mark


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/27/2011 12:06:36 AM
Message:

Mark. I got those from Campbell Scale Models. I called and asked if I could purchased the tanks without having to buy the kit they came in. He was a bit reluctant back then (it's been quite a long time ago since I ordered those tanks) but eventually gave in. I convinced him he could sell a lot of them if he wanted to. I added my own ladders and pipes. I used Grandt Line Products Midwest Petroleum Distributors Accessory set for my tanks at my other fertilizer facility on the previous page. They are very nice too. Tom


Reply author: akimmons
Replied on: 07/27/2011 09:04:14 AM
Message:

Very nice photos Tom. Both are great scenes and show what can be done in narrow spaces. It looks like both are right against the backdrop and the trees behind them are photos. How deep is the layout in these areas?


Reply author: brakie
Replied on: 07/27/2011 10:58:42 AM
Message:

Very nice!


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 07/27/2011 3:46:02 PM
Message:

Hi Arnold! Thanks! That area is about 12 inches wide which is about the average for most of my railroad. The widest spots are town areas and they are about 18 inches wide. The rural areas with single track are about 6 to 8 inches wide.

Larry, Danny, Mike, and Mark. Thank you guys for the kind words and the thumb up.


Reply author: rayschofield
Replied on: 07/27/2011 11:37:41 PM
Message:

Tom great work asusual


Reply author: Eric G
Replied on: 08/03/2011 3:43:14 PM
Message:

Hey Tom love the pictures very realistic and I'm a huge fan of the L&IN. Question for you since you made changes on the layout has the track plan changed at all? Just curious. Keep up the beautifull work.

Eric G


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/03/2011 4:45:16 PM
Message:

Hi Eric. I added one switch serving the Kewanna Elevator. I no longer use the middle switch that much. I put a new one in at the left end of town by the coal dealer. All other track is exactly the same. Out of the 30 plus structures on my layout, only 3 remain from the Great Model Railroads article. Yep, only 3 remain. Bruce Lake Groceery, Lucerne Farm Bureau Coop (however, I've added several additions to it), and the Marlo Restaurant (brick structure in Kewanna with added detail like the awnings). I did replace a couple with the exact same kit but with some modifications such as concrete porches instead of wood.


Reply author: Ollie
Replied on: 08/05/2011 05:42:28 AM
Message:

This is some of the most realisitic modeling I have ever seen... :)


Reply author: DMRyrootie
Replied on: 08/11/2011 4:06:32 PM
Message:

Hi Tom,
I had to join this forum just to commend you on your modeling. I've been a fan of your modeling since I first saw it in RMC years ago. Some of the the finest work I have ever seen, you really should write a book. Roads, backdrops, structures, equipment, vehicles--you are a true artist at all of these. Please, please, please keep the photos coming, they are an inspiration. I can't wait to see the C420's. Keep up the great work.
Chris


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/12/2011 12:27:45 AM
Message:

Chris, Ray, Eric, and Ollie. Thanks a bunch guys for the kind words. Chris, I will continue to add pictures to this post. I'd rather just add to this post from time to time instead of making a new post all the time. Write a book? I've been asked that before. Tony Koester keeps trying to convince me to write more articles for MR. I did the one with the road into a backdrop but have done nothing since that one. I thought about doing an update to the 2008 GMR article on all the changes I've made to the railroad and moving back to 1984. Not sure though if I'll do that or any of them right now. I'm just having fun operating and doing other things right now. RMC??? Wow! That was a long time ago. I think it was November of 1985????? I was just a younster back then. Now I'm retired! Where did all of those years go????

Tom


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/12/2011 02:00:32 AM
Message:

I've added more details to many of my structures and scenery in general. I've added individual leaves to roof tops and on the pavement areas in front of many structures and in the roads and streets in general. I glued these down one by one with wood glue. I've also added larger masses of leaves along the edges of my roads and under trees. I glued these in place using detergent and water for a wetting agent and then soaking them with a 50/50 mix of glue and water. You can compare these photos to others I've posted before to see the additions of details. I also added several new pop machines, gas pumps, and other various details to some of my structures to bring them more into the early 80's in rural farm towns in Indiana. I am very pleased with the additional details. By adding the leaves, I feel I've done away with that "too clean and too neat" look. That bothered me a bit. The leaves are actually shaped like leaves. They are new from Scenic Express and Silflor. They come on a netting material but can easily be removed for this purpose. Thanks for looking.
Tom Johnson



























The following two photos are my favorite photos I've taken on my L&IN. They show the larger masses of leaves along the edges of the roads and the individual wind blown leaves in the roads.






Reply author: Twist67
Replied on: 08/12/2011 04:32:36 AM
Message:

Hi,
Thats amazing...The leaves looks great and those updated machines and gaspumps are looking very nice and matching perfect...
Is it usual that there are gaspumps on buidlings like Jones Grocery over there in the USA?Ive never seen something like that here in Germany.
Great work on all the details,scenery etc....Its always an inspiration for me to look at your layout pictures...
Regards,Chris


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/12/2011 10:08:57 PM
Message:

Hi Chris. Yes, you could fine the gas pumps or just a gas pump on a front porch. We had one at a small country store back in the 80's about 20 miles north of my house. Not common but can be seen at times. Many older station had those overhangs in front with the pumps between the support posts. Distance wise, they were the same as my Jones' Grocery.


Reply author: MarkF
Replied on: 08/13/2011 01:03:04 AM
Message:

Wow Tom, leaves on the roof tops! Now I would never have thought of something like that, but you did and you did it perfectly! What a great detail. It adds so much to the scenes. And I agree - those last two pictures are great shots, not only showing the leaves, but a different perspective of your layout. I can't help but repeat again how inspirational your layout is. It captures a great atmosphere!


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 08/13/2011 08:09:32 AM
Message:

Tom, youve taken what I considered already terrific scenes and improved them! Those leaves really give the feeling of autumn.

George


Reply author: akimmons
Replied on: 08/13/2011 08:11:42 AM
Message:

Tom,
that's a neat product...very nice. You keep making subtle but realistic tweaks to your layout. As always, you push the bar a little higher for the rest of us!


Reply author: brakie
Replied on: 08/13/2011 3:55:20 PM
Message:

Tom,It doesn't take much of a imagination to imagine the crew of the 2380 has stop in order to get a sandwich and pop or coffee at Bruce Lake Grocery-after all we did that several times when I was working on the PRR and called for one of the urban industrial locals in Columbus.

There was a mom & pop store located by a crossing that made great tasting sandwiches.We would stop short of the crossing and and get our lunch and return to our train..We was the only train on that industrial branch.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/13/2011 6:18:16 PM
Message:

Mark, George, Arnold, and Larry. Thanks guys as always.

Larry. Thanks for sharing your experiences when you worked on the railroad. That is exactly what I was trying to achieve with both pictures. The L&IN crew grabbed a snack and a bottle of pop at Bruce Lake Grocery while the GP35 idles away on the main. I often do this when I operate. I'll stop at the Marlo Restaurant in Kewanna, Bruce Lake Grocery in Bruce Lake, or Jones Grocery in Delong for the crew to grab a bite to eat. Not all in the same day of course. I can simply stop at any one of those three locations and take an hour break. I usually let the engine idle for about an hour. I'll actually go upstairs and grab something to eat myself. It takes me about 2 to 3 hours to operate my railroad. I run at very slow speeds and I also take the time to simulate the crew walking the train, throwing switches, uncoupling cars and so on. Sometimes, it takes me a whole day to run a local. I'll switch a town for about 30 to 45 minutes and then move on to the next town and take a break. I have a hidden area where I can stop the train to simulate time and distance. This is on my way out of Logansport where the train vanishes through a cut of trees and moves into a hidden area under the stairs. I'll let it sit there for about an hour or more and then have it appear in the other room at Lucerne entering the room through a cut of trees. So, combined with the one hour lunch, that gives me about two hours I can stop for a while and go do something else. ABout 95% of the rolling stock that is set out are covered hoppers. The other 5% are made up of tank cars for anhydrous, open hoppers for occasional coal being delivered to a grain elevator, or a boxcar delivered to a team track. Yes, coal was still delivered to some grain elevators in the early 80's. There are a couple of locations here in Indiana that get coal today. Most of the shortlines around here served grain elevators only and 100% of the cars delivered are covered hoppers. One shortline (The Fulton County Railroad) served only one elevator company (Wilson's Feed and Seed) in Rochester. They used to get 50 or more hoppers a week. Now, most of the grain is hauled out in trucks. But, they still get 2 to 3 covered hoppers about once every two weeks for bird seed loading. These are always four bay center flow hoppers. Yep, just 2 or 3 cars every two weeks or slightly less. The Elkhart and Western does the work for The Fulton County Railroad. So, you see, there is a prototype to all operations. Tom Johnson


Reply author: DMRyrootie
Replied on: 08/14/2011 09:48:30 AM
Message:

Thanks for posting more pix, Tom. Great stuff. I can't wait to see what is next.
Chris


Reply author: Darin Larabee
Replied on: 08/18/2011 7:07:06 PM
Message:

Tom,

Your modeling is absolutely stunning and truly inspiring! You model two of my most favorite things, Autumn and small rural towns. Growing up in Nebraska I feel like I'm almost home when I look at your pictures and I swear I can hear Rascal Flats song "Mayberry" playing also.

The addition of the extra little details go a long way to complete the scene especially all those tiny individual leaves from Scenic Express!!

Being a true ALCO fan myself, I can hardly wait to see them plying the rails soon on your layout!

Keep up the great work and thank you for posting all your notes and pictures! They will definitely help me when I get my model railroad started this fall. I'll know who to ask when I get stuck!


Best regards,

Darin Larabee

www.ddl-photography-studio.smugmug.com


Reply author: ibflattop
Replied on: 08/18/2011 9:23:51 PM
Message:

Tom.
Your pictures of what you have done to the layout since I have seen it in Person has brought it up to a level of Outstanding! I love looking at your pictures of your stock going thru your areas. Have you ever thought of making a video of the layout and posting it on You Tube? That would be another outlet that you could dive into. Hummmmmmm Maybe I should make another visit. Kevin


Reply author: nhguy
Replied on: 08/19/2011 1:45:29 PM
Message:

Great modelling Tom. It gets better and better when you update the photos. Thanks for sharing your skill and attention to detail.


Reply author: MLW
Replied on: 08/20/2011 08:42:42 AM
Message:

Wow! Superb modelling & craftmanship again!




This is high quality and high level modelling.

Thanks for the update and info. Never tire of looking at this thread.


Syl


Reply author: hammersr
Replied on: 08/21/2011 4:38:41 PM
Message:

Tom -

Amazing work as always. I noticed you have been adding antenna to most of your buildings. Are you making these or is there somewhere to purchase them?

Please keep posting photos as they truly are an inspiration to all of us.

Jerry


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/28/2011 6:10:50 PM
Message:

The following photos came from another post of mine. I thought I would add them here too. I did my usual blending with acrylic paints in blending the modeled road with the road in the backdrop. What I did differently here is I used my airbrush and purposely "spattered" light and dark colors of paint onto the road in the photo to blend the texture of the ballast used for my modeled gravel roads. The Silflor leaves on the road and it's edges also help blend the two together.

Tom Johnson









Reply author: HobbyDr
Replied on: 08/28/2011 7:29:38 PM
Message:

Hmmmm, I'm a little disappointed. I thought your scene in the other post was much superior. ;)

Don


Reply author: ibflattop
Replied on: 08/28/2011 8:08:46 PM
Message:

Tom.
Are your roads made out of N scale ballast and glue? I am trying to remember how you did them but its not coming to me. Kevin


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/30/2011 02:29:26 AM
Message:

Kevin. Yes they are. I use Highball N scale ballast and the typical glue and water application. The biggest thing to remember is after the road has dried for about 45 minutes or thereabouts, remove the tape from the edges and tamp down the ballast with a small block of basswood. I use my finger for the edges. If the ballast sticks to the block of wood, allow it to dry longer. Tamping down the ballast gives the road a smoother surface and yet you can still see the typical texture in pitch and seal style of pavement. It is more course than regular black asphalt. This method also works well for regular asphalt too. Some modelers might say that there is too much texture. Well, it's not that bad in person and it is better than perfectly smooth roads you get by using plastic or other materials. I'm not bashing plastic styrene for roads either. I use plastic styrene for concrete parking areas in front of several of my structures. It's whatever you like. :o) As they say, it's your railroad.

Tom


Reply author: Mark R.
Replied on: 08/30/2011 02:33:10 AM
Message:

Absolutely amazing work on all accounts Tom ! I've admired your work for a long time, and as I was recently browsing through the 500+ pictures I've saved of your work, I found it entertaining to compare the changes over the years (hope you don't mind me adding a few of your pictures myself) ....








Mark.


Reply author: Ollie
Replied on: 08/30/2011 4:14:52 PM
Message:

I love this forum, another AMAIZING and MOST inspirering thread!!!!


Reply author: Frederic Testard
Replied on: 08/30/2011 4:21:18 PM
Message:

Great pictures, nice evolution. Thanks for showing this little piece of history, Mark.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/30/2011 11:34:17 PM
Message:

And don't forget this one with the new 70's and 80's era gas pump added and the 70's and 80's era Coke machine replacing the 50's era machine. The structure was completely rebuilt using another of the same AMB kit. :o)


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 08/30/2011 11:57:45 PM
Message:

You guys can probably see a lot of changes over the years. I started out modeling pretty much post 2000 with a few more modern looking elevators and a freelanced shortline. Then, I got crazy and backdated to 1966. I was one lost puppy and never did care seeing boxcars spotted at my elevators. I changed 90% of my structures to better reflect a period ranging from the 60's to the 80's. Most of what was seen in the 60's in small farm towns could still be seen in the 80's. I know I've said that many times in the past. I missed my covered hoppers big time. So, I stopped listening to everyone else and went with my heart. Back to 1984 I went and brought back the L&IN. That was where I originally wanted to backdate to in the first place. So now I had to go back and make some small changes AGAIN! Only small detail changes though. I added L&IN signs to depots and crossbucks. I changed pop machines. I changed some gas pumps. I changed a few signs but left most of those alone. I changed auto's. Removed trees in some places and replaced some in others. Added a bunch of detail like the leaves. Changed a few scenes. I'm changing my PRR signals now to the "red eyes" absolute stop signals at my diamonds. They now have the three horizontal amber lights and need to be changed to the two red lights to better reflect these signals for the 80's. Oh well, now you know what I've been dealing with. I'm currently changing the last scene and backdrop on my railroad. That is Logansport. The new backdrop is up and all I need to do now is add the scenery in front. I'm also going to add a modern BLMA yard office and lots of detail around it. I'll add photos here when I'm done. Then, I'm done!!! No more changes. Just run trains. LOL

Tom Johnson


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/30/2011 01:55:30 AM
Message:

Just playing around with the camera while operating.






















Well, that's it for now. Stay tuned. I've completely redone the entire landscape and backdrop around and behind the GP35 in the bottom two photos (Logansport). It was the very last of the old scenes. Now I can say all of the layout has been changed in some way. Tom Johnson


Reply author: andykins
Replied on: 09/30/2011 05:13:05 AM
Message:

wow, wow and wow again! your beautiful layout is the reason behind my change of season for my layout! thank you so much for posting more photos. id love to see a number of photos from one side of the layout to th other, if you have not already posted something like this before?


Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 09/30/2011 1:54:27 PM
Message:

Tom, outstanding as usual, love the Alco!Great weathering on the Geep. I especially like how you minimize using people, but maximize detail. My only advice is dullcote some of those vehicles a bit more and bend a few axles to make the wheel not all straight. mike h.


Reply author: SW15002001
Replied on: 09/30/2011 11:54:07 PM
Message:

Hi Tom:

Great modeling and photos as usual.

Your layout reminds me of growing up in central Illinois (Urbana) as a teenager.My folks had just moved our family from the hills and lakes of southern Minnesota to the flat, farm land of Illinois in the fall of 1960. I was sad to have left the place where I had grown up but soon came to enjoy downstate Illinois and especially the fall season with its brillant,colorful trees and long, mild autumn weekends. It gave me plenty of time to seek out the local railroads like the Wabash branch,the Peoria & Eastern yard, the Illinois Terminal trackage rights operations and of course the big player in town, the Mainline of Midamerica the Illinois Central,yard,locals,branches,
roundhouse, coach yard, passenger trains and football specials for the UI.

Oh, the things we took for granted back then, not taking photos of what we saw because we figured it would always be there. But you, with your fine modeling have awakened many pleasant memories of fall railroad days close to where I lived. Little did I know that those bicycle trips to the rails as a teenager would one day turn into a career of forty plus years as a railroader.

Thanks, for posting your work and please continue to do so.

Barry


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 10/02/2011 12:32:46 AM
Message:

Thanks guys. As always, I appreciate the kind words.

Mike. I'm a bit puzzled by your statement of dullcoting my vehicles a bit more. They already are. :o) Look at the pictures above again. The green Dodge Power Wagon is dull. The black and silver Chevy pickup is weathered and dull. The station wagons and such or more satin than shiny. Most vehicles do have a bit of a shine to them you know. They aren't all 100% flat in appearance. I have a 1955 Ford pickup on my layout that's really flat and beat up. That is the era I would expect to see a super dull vehicle. Not 70's and 80's vehicles. I've turned many front wheels on my vehicles in the past. I do have a couple on the layout right now that are that way. The problem is I've ruined too many vehicles after spending many hours on them by doing that. Plus, they don't sit with all four wheels on the ground after doing that at times. It's a small trade off not potentially destroying a vehicle after spending quite a bit of time custom painting, weathering, and detailing them. Trident trucks are pretty easy to turn but others aren't so easy.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: Frederic Testard
Replied on: 10/02/2011 08:53:36 AM
Message:

Tom, your photos are always so inspirationnal. I love them, even if the landscapes I try to model have so little common point with what you do. Your approach on modelling makes everything look incredibly nice and believable!


Reply author: MarkF
Replied on: 10/02/2011 11:25:32 AM
Message:

More great shots! Amazing. As has been said, very inspirational. I think what ties everything together so nicely on your layout is the weathering. Well done - not too much, not too little. Always enjoy your updates.


Reply author: Ollie
Replied on: 10/02/2011 12:52:57 PM
Message:

I really loveyour photos and your modelling. The Alco looks like it belongs there hauling the grain!


Reply author: MLW
Replied on: 10/02/2011 1:00:01 PM
Message:

Wonderfull! Looking great! You did a very good job on the loco and the cars.

WOW

Thanks for posting

Syl


Reply author: Ray Schofield
Replied on: 10/02/2011 5:37:40 PM
Message:

Tom
Boy senility. I haven't been here for a while and almost missed seeing THE promised ALCOs Great work as usual, Your latest road to backrop are unbelievabe.
Thanks for sharing

quote:
Originally posted by INRAIL

Just playing around with the camera while operating.






















Well, that's it for now. Stay tuned. I've completely redone the entire landscape and backdrop around and behind the GP35 in the bottom two photos (Logansport). It was the very last of the old scenes. Now I can say all of the layout has been changed in some way. Tom Johnson


Reply author: MikeFisher
Replied on: 10/02/2011 6:03:47 PM
Message:

Tom, I keep coming back to your work to admire. To me, HO scale just doesn't get any better, everything is so well done!

Question for you-- the gas station pumps and oil can racks, how did you make those, and are they commercial parts I can buy somewhere?

Thanks
Mike


Reply author: brakie
Replied on: 10/02/2011 7:03:01 PM
Message:

The 100 looks tired but,she's still wheezing away doing a honest day's work.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 10/02/2011 11:20:34 PM
Message:

Thanks again guys for the kind words. I really mean that. Ray and Brakie. More Alco's are coming. Stay tuned.

Mike Fisher. The gas station pumps come from the Walther's Al's Victory Service gas station. The pumps are really nice castings but I added the hoses, pump face, and other graphics using photos I've taken or Microscale Decals gas station decals. They have many different brands to choose from. The individually stacked oil cans are individual cans believe it or not. I used small diameter Evergreen styrene rod for the cans. I painted the styrene rod with Scalecoat II paint and cut those oil can decals from the Microscale gas station sheets into vertical rows and applied them to the rod. After several applications of Champ Decal Set (other brands work fine too), I finally got them to conform the the curve of the styrene rod. This wasn't easy. Then, I coated them with some Floquil Flat Finish which is really a satin finish IMO. Then, after some drying time, I sliced them with an X-acto knife into individual cans. I painted the top of each can silver and then stacked them using CA. The Shell station oil can racks came from a kit. I believe they came from a City Classic's gas station kit. I painted them and again added vertical rows of Microscale gas station decals (oil cans) decals to each vertical stack in the rack. I added some black paint between each row to add some depth and painted the tops of the top row of cans silver. Hope this explanation helps. You may email me if you have more questions. I'll try my best to answer and even include a photo or two that my help.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 10/02/2011 11:39:55 PM
Message:

Barry.

Everything you've said I can relate to. I grew up in a small town (Plymouth, IN) also in the 60's along the NKP and PRR. I remember those football specials to ND games. I was born in1951 but my memories come from the late 50's and well into the 60's and 70's. When I built my scenery (even though I'm modeling October of the mid 80's), I tried to bring back some of those memories from my younger years. Many of the scenery details of the 1960's could still be easily seen in the 80's. So, I'm getting the best of both worlds. I can model my covered hoppers and shortline of the 80's while still being able to model the structures and details of the 60's and 70's. And, I wish I had taken pictures back then too. :o)

Tom Johnson


Reply author: MikeFisher
Replied on: 10/03/2011 2:41:53 PM
Message:

Thanks Tom! I was hoping the gas station details were commercial items I could pick up from Walthers but I should have known better! Would be great if you posted up a how-to thread in the craftsman forum next tim eyou take on a project. Id love to watch and learn. Or even better, you should write a book on how you do your magic. Kalmbach would publish it for sure! Mike


Reply author: PEIR
Replied on: 02/05/2012 8:04:18 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by INRAIL





All of the scenery and structures are very nicely done. I like the shot of the Geep headed out of town after a hard days work.


Reply author: Schoolmaster
Replied on: 02/05/2012 8:35:32 PM
Message:

I love the cracks in the road. I can imagine the summer heat.


Reply author: alco251
Replied on: 03/11/2012 07:39:28 AM
Message:

Love the layout ever since it appeared in the 2008 Great Model Railroads,who makes the soda machines and 70's era gas pumps.It's not always easy to get info on the small stuff here in the UK.I know JL Innovations do some detail stuff(virus on their website 03/09/2012)most of my searching throws up stuff for the 40's/50's.
cheers Bob.


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