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The Gallery: Sept. 10 "Kitbash or Kit Mods"

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Printed on: 10/14/2019

Topic:


Topic author: Dutchman
Subject: The Gallery: Sept. 10 "Kitbash or Kit Mods"
Posted on: 08/31/2010 10:39:32 PM
Message:

With summer behind us and prime modeling time in front of us, I thought we could get the creative juices flowing by featuring some models. Not everyone builds kits according to the original plans. This month we will showcase structures that are the result of Art Curren type kitbashes or just plain modifications to the original plans. For extra interest, add a few words describing the bash or modifications.

I once again caution everyone to keep copyright issues in mind. If you didn't take the picture, it isn't yours to post. Links to photos on the web are allowed, however.

In consideration for those on dial-up, please keep your photos to 80KB or smaller.

Replies:


Reply author: engineerkyle
Replied on: 09/01/2010 12:24:41 AM
Message:


Hi Bruce and all,

Great subject....

Here is an little animal of my own Creation. I'm not even sure what kit it started out as. The parts were probably picked up at some train show for a few dollars. I guess it is more of a scratch build than a kit bash... or a little of each.

The structure looks good in the yard, and I call it the Tawas Yard Interlocking Tower. I look forward to seeing other's creations soon.
















Reply author: drs_rr
Replied on: 09/01/2010 01:17:23 AM
Message:

Started out with Bar Mills Modes N scale version of Mooney's Plumbing and modified it by making the structure in the shape of T instead of a long narrow building. Then created some new signs for it tooand changed up some of the roofing. Although taken at a different angle, this scene and structure is featured on the cover of Sept/Oct 2010 N Scale magazine.


Thanks for taking a look,


Reply author: dgjj
Replied on: 09/01/2010 01:46:46 AM
Message:

This started out as an N scale repair shop , I think it was made by Mainline Siding, came in a brown box.
A friend asked me to make a couple of buildings for a ghost town. I decided to make this one pretty run down. I changed the roofing to corrugated iron sheeting (from paper creek models, really hard to tell from the real thing in n scale) and generally wore the building out .
I saw a building in similar condition years ago and remembered it had a tree growing out of it, which I thought would look quite good in model form.











cheers
Dave


Reply author: engineerkyle
Replied on: 09/01/2010 08:57:01 AM
Message:

Love the tree growing through the roof Dave!


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/01/2010 09:54:31 AM
Message:

Bustard Box Company, named after modeling friend Paul Bustard, started as a Campbell "Saez Chairs". It had die cut cardboard sides and roof, to be covered with their corrugated aluminum sheets. Since I was modeling a logging/woodworking area on my modules, I traced the sides onto scribed wood siding material and cut them out. There were several dormer windows on the front part, I left them off. The rest of the dust gathering structure was from the kit.

I was at a local camera shop and they had a countertop display with motorised silver corkscrew things turning, promoting some camera brand. All worked by battery. It looked interesting, and I asked them if I could have the display when they were through with it. They said I could have it!

So I took it home and fitted two of the three shafts from the gearbox to turn the rooftop cyclones. They came from Campbell too I think. The unit was powered by two "D" cells in series. I operate the cyclones when my modules are set up, and train show visitors often see them and think they are neat. The original D batteries lasted about 15 years of occasional operation, often 6-8 hours at a time.

And now you know!










Reply author: railman28
Replied on: 09/01/2010 6:07:22 PM
Message:

Started out as a Campbel kit.

now Coos Bay Meats. She's the 2nd biggest customer on the line.

Bob Harris


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 09/01/2010 7:33:55 PM
Message:

Hey Crew,

Yet another great topic, Bruce. And one to which I will be able to contribute since, as many of you will remember, I am an inveterate Curren-style kitbash fan. For my first contribution to this month's Gallery, I'll start with a few of my earliest projects dating to the late 70's and early 80's.

First, years and years ago I came across a picture of a country store and gas station. I decided to capture the flavor of it (I rarely model anything exactly) using two of the ubiquitous cheap plastic whoever-made-it Texaco gas station kits to create "Ed's Gas & Grocery." The first photo shows the basic station; you can see where I spliced the two together. The second two photos show the station on my previous-previous layout and my previous layout.







Years after I built the structure, I came across a postcard of a Stuckey's Pecan Shoppe that looked strangely familiar, so I did a b&w version of Ed's to simulate the scene. This little guy has been on every layout since and will, without question, be on the next one.




Most often, when we think of kitbashing, we think of structures. But rolling stock can be kitbashed as well. In my case, modeling a Southern Short Line, I needed a typical mixed train daily center door combine. Since none were available, I kitbashed one using a La Belle 1890's open platform combine kit to capture the flavor of Wadley Southern #12.




Since I also wanted a business/private car (not totally unknown on Georgia short lines), I again called upon La Belle Woodworking to provide the basic car body, and rearranged the windows. The interior detailing is based on a series of Robert Aaberg articles in RMC.





Hope y'all enjoy, and I'll post some more "bashes" as I can.

Steve Flanigan


Reply author: Mike Hamer
Replied on: 09/01/2010 8:52:08 PM
Message:

Steve, I always love looking at your modelling efforts and these structures and rolling stock kitbashes are absolutely amazing. So are the contributions of everyone else.

I am waiting a few days for my computer to come back from the shop. Hopefully I'll be able to contribute to this thread then.

Yes, we all recall the creative talent of Ed Curren and he is deeply missed, for sure. Great idea for the thread for September, Bruce!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/01/2010 9:19:25 PM
Message:

Thanks to all who have jumped in early with some great submissions.

My first major bash of a kit was motivated by this forum's first challenge. To see what members were doing back then, here is the link:

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=4293

As part of that Challenge, I started with this classic styrene kit.



By modifying the roof, getting rid of the plastic loading dock, adding a foundation and a brick addition, I got my Borden's Creamery.






Reply author: dnhman
Replied on: 09/02/2010 09:48:51 AM
Message:

Love this topic Bruce,, need to find my camera and share a few,,


Reply author: dnhman
Replied on: 09/02/2010 10:34:45 AM
Message:


Found camera!,, 1st is a loader kitbashed from the Walthers Mine kit, this is per an MR article a few years ago.



2nd, is a Cambell's slaughter house kit I repurposed for a small factory. I built I moved most of the walls and added an platform cut into first floor.




3rd, This row of buildings from left to right, Ma's place from AHM is now a house. The pizzeria is all parts from the scrap box. The small manufacturer is from an AHM kit which I cant recall the origin of.







This is kitbash of the ever present AHM kits which they used to make many of their kits.




The following is an Art Curren DPM kitbash from his book.




The last is one I have been working on recently. It too is from the Art Curren book it was called the "wedge factory" made up from two of the Burlington mills kits from IHC or Tyco.

















Reply author: LVN
Replied on: 09/02/2010 1:27:44 PM
Message:



Walthers Cornerstone kits make great raw material to build larger complexes. LVN Grain terminal and Safeway Foods


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/02/2010 2:57:53 PM
Message:

So is this month's thread to be on structures as noted in the first post "This month we will showcase structures that are the result of Art Curren type kitbashes or just plain modifications to the original plans.

Or rolling stock as well? Would be nice to know so we could all be on the same page.

Thanks!




Reply author: lumberjack
Replied on: 09/02/2010 6:24:09 PM
Message:

I suppose this could be considered a kitbash. I purchased a FSM Cippy Hollow kit and made latex rubber moulds of the stone walls and a number of other castings in the kit. I used dental plaster to cast the stone walls. I added a stone walled addition to one side for a truck loading dock.







Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 09/02/2010 6:36:18 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by railphotog

Or rolling stock as well? Would be nice to know so we could all be on the same page. Thanks!



Sorry Bob...I deleted my post so as not to create any confusion. I misread the first post regarding this thread being for structures.


Reply author: Chester
Replied on: 09/02/2010 8:42:18 PM
Message:

There are only a few modifications to this DPM "Shultz's Garage" to turn it into an abandoned truck repair and sales garage.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/03/2010 09:41:35 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by railphotog

So is this month's thread to be on structures as noted in the first post "This month we will showcase structures that are the result of Art Curren type kitbashes or just plain modifications to the original plans.

Or rolling stock as well? Would be nice to know so we could all be on the same page.

Thanks!



Bob (and all),

Rolling stock and other kit bash/mods are certainly welcome. Sorry for the omission.


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 09/03/2010 7:03:06 PM
Message:

Hey Crew,

Last time, we took a look at "Ed's Gas & Grocery," a kitbash using two Texaco gas station kits. You'll notice though, that the sign on the portico says "Tourist Camp." That, of course, implies that there are, indeed, tourist cabins. So here they are:


These are modified from a Historical Miniatures "Red Light District" kit. I used photographs in John Baeder's great book, Gas, Food & Lodging to capture the flavor. The interior of one of the cabins is detailed and lighted following illustrations in the book.

Now, any self respecting stretch of rural Southern highway back in the 1950's needs a tourist attraction. I respectfully submit for your consideration "D. Lloyd's Land o' Fruits & Nuts:"






Lloyd's is named after my former LHS proprietor Dave Lloyd and is kitbashed from a Walthers Interstate Oil kit building. I scratchbuilt the front wall, and the side addition. The tank is also from the Walthers kit with Woodland Scenics dry transfer lettering. Interestingly, all of the signage was printed on the computer and affixed to the front wall and signs. And, yes, troops, that sack in the last pic does say "GRITS." (Aw, c'mon, John, no peach barbs.)

So, we've got ourselves a rural gas & grocery, some rural tourist cabins, and a rural tourist trap, er, attraction. So how does it all come togeter on the layout? Here's how:


(Disregard the cheesy restaurant on the right; it's not kitbashed, it's scratchbuilt.)

That's it for now. Hope y'all enjoy and we'll catch y'all later.

Steve Flanigan


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 09/05/2010 02:45:29 AM
Message:

Steve-
I really enjoyed seeing your work again.



Here is a vehicle kitbash. Back in '08 I decided to make a model of a scissors-type coal delivery truck along the lines of those I remember seeing as a kid. To do this I combined parts from a Jordan Mack high-lift coal dump truck kit and a Sylvan White Super Power 1940-'58 cab and chassis kit. The Sylvan chassis had to be widened to fit the Jordan scissors mechanism--


For the signage I couldn't resist photoshopping this real sign which is preserved at the Whippany Railroad Museum...


...into this tribute to our friend Bruce DeYoung --


I scratched a stake flatbed for the leftover Mack cab and frame following photos of an actual prototype--

-Dave


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/06/2010 02:25:47 AM
Message:

Here is one of my contributions to this months theme. It is a kitbashed elevator using two American Model Builders Silex Elevators. One kit was built as is and the second one was used for the additions to the left and right. A Rix bin was added along with an auger complete with the motor at the end above the bin. It came from a Walther's kit. Tom Johnson






Reply author: quarryman
Replied on: 09/06/2010 07:27:15 AM
Message:

[quote]Originally posted by prrvandalia

Here is one of my contributions to this months theme.

Tom,

I always enjoy seeing photos of your modeling. Your paint, detail and weathering on this metal structure is fantastic and really pulls all the various parts together and sets the tone for the scene.

Mark Chase
Richmond VA


Reply author: quarryman
Replied on: 09/06/2010 07:34:49 AM
Message:

This tool car is a combination of two On30 rolling stock kits



A Cache Creek logging caboose body on a Chivers flatcar. Styrene railings added.

Mark Chase
Richmond VA


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/06/2010 08:59:07 AM
Message:

This CN double track snowplow was bashed from a Walthers single track Russell plow:



It's a "double track" plow as they were used on double track main lines and would throw snow only to one side, and not onto the other track.




Reply author: deemery
Replied on: 09/06/2010 09:40:52 AM
Message:

Here's another bash of the Walthers plow, into an earlier period single track plow:

I got a 'first time modeler' prize with this at the NMRA MER convention a couple years ago.

dave


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/06/2010 10:00:38 AM
Message:

This one fits in the category of a kit modification. The kit is an HOn3 28' Carter Brothers Flat Car from Evergreen Hill Designs.

I simply made it into a car for carrying wood to the chemical factories.


Reply author: Chester
Replied on: 09/06/2010 5:31:50 PM
Message:

Just about all of my vehicles are kit bashed but this one was a real stretch from the original. This started as the '34 Ford bus from Jordan Miniatures.



And this one is a little more tame kit bashing. The Jordan bus again but with the '37 Chevy front clip from a Sylvan kit.








Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/07/2010 09:46:33 AM
Message:

My On30 side door caboose, kitbashed from two Bachmann short center cupola models.
Of course not long after I made the model, Bachmann released a somewhat similar one!





Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/08/2010 06:16:29 AM
Message:

Not a lot of action on this thread. I only post once a day, and my post from yesterday is still the last one.

Here's a CP wide vision caboose I kitbashed many years ago using friend Patrick Lawson's article in RMC. Used two Athearn wide vision cabeese to make the longer version. Man, it was a lot of work, filling in windows, making new ones, sctatching the end platform details, etc. I bought two extra Athearn models with the intent of making another one, but lost interest after completing this one.

Now Rapido sells them RTR!










Reply author: FiatFan
Replied on: 09/08/2010 10:38:05 PM
Message:

Here's a DPM modular kit I forced into an odd size on my layout. I obviously need to do much more to it.



Tom


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/09/2010 06:40:08 AM
Message:

My Fundy Northern doodlebug, kitbashed from a Roundhouse Harriman car, with an Athearn SW-7 power train. From an article in MR many moons ago. The roundhouse was scratchbuilt.






Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/09/2010 08:37:52 AM
Message:

A slashed/bashed and much downsized Glacier Gravel.


Reply author: Mike Hamer
Replied on: 09/09/2010 08:42:31 AM
Message:

Great images everyone! Lots of wonderful kit and scratch builds, for sure. I do have some images to share, but I have to learn the new photo program on my new computer after I get the first week of school behind me!


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/09/2010 11:48:55 PM
Message:


Here is my kitbashed Farm Bureau Co-op fertilizer facility. It is kitbashed using a cut down Walther's Farmers Cooperative Rural Grain Elevator kit plus utilizing the shed that comes with the kit at one end and purchasing a second one and adding it to the other end. I changed the bottom of these sheds so they are not the same height and don't look like each other. I also added corrugated steel siding to the track side walls. The last photo is my favorite. It is a Jim Six photo with a photoshopped sky added.

Tom Johnson






Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/09/2010 11:49:28 PM
Message:

Here is another kitbashed elevator using the American Model Builders Silex Grain Elevator. Several additions were made using Evergreen styrene corrugated metal siding.

Tom Johnson




Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/10/2010 07:14:53 AM
Message:

With two of Walt's (Rusty Stumps Scale Models) Boarding House kits on the shelf, I modified this one so they didn't look the same. At the same time, I added it to my 'Grandchild Series' and named it after granddaughter Myranda.

Walt's original kit:



My version with modified roof line, front stairs on the left side (instead of the right as on the kit), rear stairs facing forward instead of to the rear, and garbage can shed added to left side.




Reply author: GreggW
Replied on: 09/10/2010 09:15:40 AM
Message:

Here is a shot from an FSM Houligan's Alley kitbash.

Gregg



Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/10/2010 11:31:04 PM
Message:

Bruce. I REALLY like your version of the boarding house. I just may look into that kit for a place on my layout. It makes a great country or small town store. I can see some gas pumps out front and a pop machine. =o) Very nice job on your version. Nice color scheme too!

Gregg. I REALLY like your Houligan's Alley kitbash too! Sure would love to see some close up photo's.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: GreggW
Replied on: 09/11/2010 12:12:35 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by prrvandalia

Bruce. ... Gregg. I REALLY like your Houligan's Alley kitbash too! Sure would love to see some close up photo's.

Tom Johnson

Thanks Tom. Yes, this one turned out pretty good. Here are a couple more shots.





You can find many more pics at the following link.
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=19564

Gregg


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/11/2010 07:08:48 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by prrvandalia

Bruce. I REALLY like your version of the boarding house. I just may look into that kit for a place on my layout. It makes a great country or small town store. I can see some gas pumps out front and a pop machine. =o) Very nice job on your version. Nice color scheme too!



Thanks, Tom. Here is a link to the thread on my (and other's) work on this kit. http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20692&whichpage=5


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/12/2010 05:49:50 AM
Message:

This is an HO scale model of a CP Rail scale test car, I kitbashed it using photos of the prototype I shot locally. It started out as a Model Power cylindrical hopper that I shortened and added detailing:






Reply author: santafewillie
Replied on: 09/12/2010 06:58:29 AM
Message:

I was just re-reading this thread and noticed something that I have to ask Steve (leeflan). In the lower right corner of the Lloyds Land o' Fruit & Nuts sign, does it really say "DCC Installed"? Any particular meaning?


Reply author: Chester
Replied on: 09/12/2010 5:54:23 PM
Message:

Some terrific examples of the great imagination here seen so far this month.

This is the simple Newspaper Office kit from Innovative designs turned into a butcher shop. Added the walkout basement on both structures out of Evergreen styrene brick sheet.






Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/13/2010 02:17:05 AM
Message:

Here is a Walthers Gold Ribbon Series Benson's Five and Dime kit bashed with the back end of a second Walthers Gold Ribbon Series structure for the gas station annex. The pop machines were built using layered photos on a plastic core with details added. The pop cases were made from a Preiser kit with photos of the side of a real wooden Coke cases attached to the sides. Weathering blends everything in.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/13/2010 02:21:02 AM
Message:

Bruce. Thanks for the link to added photos of your structure. Very nice!!!

Gregg. Also thanks for the added photos and the link. I really enjoyed looking at the close up photos. Excellent!

Tom Johnson


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/13/2010 08:15:31 AM
Message:

This center cab diesel's heritage should be obvious, but I'll state it anyway.

Made from an Athearn SW-7 chassis and two shells.

I did a lot of such kitbashing years ago when such models were plentiful and cheap at local train shows.

Lots of fun for a minimal investment. Doubt if I could do the same these days,
as cutting up two expensive DCC/DC switchers would be beyond my interest.






Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/13/2010 09:15:30 AM
Message:

A small modification to a classic kit ...

This FSM Tower came with an embossed cardstock roof.

I replaced the sub-roof with basswood and changed it into a slate roof.




Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/14/2010 04:37:11 AM
Message:

A mild kitbash here, I made a high hood Athearn SD40-2 by grafting on a portion of a hood from another shell. This is a model of an ex N&W unit purchased by CP when they were short of power, made into a "B" unit by plating over the cab windows.







Reply author: GreggW
Replied on: 09/14/2010 05:45:51 AM
Message:

I'm really enjoying seeing the creative twists everyone has demonstrated in the many kitbashes shown. For instance Chester's butcher shop build, Tom's gas station, Bruce's market and all the others.

Speaking of butcher shops, gas stations and markets, here is an FSM Butcher's Way kitbash,



where the main meat company structure became a gas station,



the butcher's shop was placed on the back of a market



and everything else was changed-up and added-to to create this unique country town scene.



These kits are boxes filled with inspiration and sometimes the beginnings of something special.

Gregg


Reply author: railman28
Replied on: 09/14/2010 06:25:28 AM
Message:

Nice job of making the kit your own.

Bob Harris


Reply author: Chester
Replied on: 09/14/2010 6:19:28 PM
Message:

Wow Gregg, nice job indeed. Love all the telephone poles and wiring, great touch and I'll bet a lot of work.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/14/2010 10:53:13 PM
Message:

Gregg! Wow! Wow!! Wow!!! Love the Auto Repair gas station and market. Those are terrific models and photo's. Wow!!!!!! Closer view of the market please. =o)

Tom Johnson. (slobbering all over myself)


Reply author: Rasputen
Replied on: 09/15/2010 09:42:55 AM
Message:

Tom, that general store scene with the pop machines is absolutely beautiful!


Reply author: GreggW
Replied on: 09/15/2010 11:16:39 AM
Message:

Bob, Chester and Tom,

Thanks for your positive comments about the Butcher's Way kitbash. Here is a link to the build, should you wish to see more.
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=28560

Tom, below are a couple shots of the market per your request.

Gregg




Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/15/2010 12:49:54 PM
Message:

Herewith is a kitbashed rotary snow plow. I used a Roundhouse tank engine shell and flat car, and an Athearn rotary housing among other things. It is mostly prototypical too, except the real one did not use a tank engine:







Reply author: CieloVistaRy
Replied on: 09/15/2010 6:08:41 PM
Message:

Very nice, Bob! I like the weathering on the housing.

Arthur


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/16/2010 02:58:22 AM
Message:

Gregg. Thanks for the close up of the general store. I'm sure you know how much I like country/general stores. I have one question after observing one photo of your scenes above. Now I'm not saying you're wrong as I know that each state has their own rules for signs. Here in Indiana, the stop signs were yellow and black up to about 1955 and many lasted well into the sixties before being changed to red and white (I have two yellow stop signs on my 1966 era layout). I was wondering if your red stop sign should be yellow. Just wondering. Love the country store!!!!!

Tom Johnson


Reply author: GreggW
Replied on: 09/16/2010 09:11:53 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by prrvandalia

... I have one question after observing one photo of your scenes above. Now I'm not saying you're wrong as I know that each state has their own rules for signs. Here in Indiana, the stop signs were yellow and black up to about 1955 and many lasted well into the sixties before being changed to red and white (I have two yellow stop signs on my 1966 era layout). I was wondering if your red stop sign should be yellow. Just wondering. Love the country store!!!!!

Tom Johnson

Tom,

I do not recall this subject ever coming up before. A 30 second Google search gives us the following: http://signalfan.freeservers.com/road%20signs/stopsign.htm
Looks like you are correct. Thanks for the education.

Gregg


Reply author: Mike Hamer
Replied on: 09/18/2010 4:39:30 PM
Message:



Scratchbuilt Baxter Boats & Marine Services industry named after my friend, Jim Baxter.



As photographed by my friend, David Haney.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/18/2010 4:53:24 PM
Message:

These background 'Company Houses' are low-relief cut-down versions of the Grandt Line "Reese Street Row Houses".


Reply author: Mike Hamer
Replied on: 09/18/2010 5:11:03 PM
Message:



Berrigan Boatworks backdrop structure. Left hand section is standard Foscale "Winger Paper Bag Co," given a new name and righthand side is scratchbuilt from materials in other kits...to create the kit "mod".



Bar Mills "1-Kit" formed main wall section with windows stolen from a Full Scale Ahead "R.G. Shinnie's Boatworks". Loading dock is an Ed Fulasz plaster product.


Reply author: Mike Hamer
Replied on: 09/18/2010 5:27:19 PM
Message:



The legion hall in North Dover hangs out over the Salmon River. This scratchbuilt structure showcases the multi-levels. I enjoy structures that exist over changing levels of ground.


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/18/2010 7:57:18 PM
Message:

So Mike where does "kitbash or kit mods" fit into your scratch built structures? Just curious in case I'm missing something!


Reply author: jon grant 4472
Replied on: 09/18/2010 8:25:05 PM
Message:

I did a few kitbashes of buildings for several Atlas Forum kitbashing projects.


Walthers Western Avenue Fire house






Atlas signal cabin






DPM Scissors Factory




This billboard at the end of the Scissors factory seemed to get more interest than the kitbashing - dunno why.



Jon


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/19/2010 02:18:18 AM
Message:

Mike. What a wonderful scene in your photo of North Dover. Great looking structures. Without looking at the locomotive, I knew this had to be a New England scene.

Jon. What a great job on the Atlas tower. That has to be the best I've seen done with that tower.


Reply author: Mike Hamer
Replied on: 09/19/2010 11:26:22 AM
Message:

Hi Bob. Thanks so much for the "heads up"! I guess when my computer fried, my brain did too!

Hey Bob, I'm always on my students to "Read the Instructions!" I had better practise what I preach!
(Can I hire you as an educational assistant in my classroom - a great retirement job for you...then we could build a model railroad with the kids!)

Now, to go back to the drawing board and look for other kit "bashes" or "mods" from the layout. Aha, here is one...



The structure in the background in this image was a kitbash, really a combining of two kits, the old AHM offerings...I believe the barn and the schoolhouse. I put these two structures together based on an article by Art Curran.



And a closer view of the combined structure. This project was done many years ago when I was relatively new to model railroading. The structure remains on my layout for sentimental reasons!


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 09/19/2010 4:14:19 PM
Message:

Here are a few pics of some structures modified from really cheap plastic kits. First, when I needed a drive-in to serve as a hangout for the local teens (circa 1957), I started out with the "ever popular" Bob's Hot Dog Stand from Model Power.



What I ended up with is the Blue Frog Drive-Inn (there used to be a Green Frog Restaurant in Georgia). The structuer itself is pretty much out-of-the-box, except that I added nail holes and weathering on the siding, interior details and lighting, and a car hop service window on one side. What really sets it apart is the signage, which is computer generated including the menu board.





When I needed a small farmhouse, I resorted to the ubiquitous Western Homestead kit from Life-Like which had been sitting in the closet for years.


Again, the structure is pretty much out-of-the-box, with extensive painting and weathering. I raised it off the ground using brick and timber pilings and scratchbuilt a front porch. The chickens, grain sack, dog and sleeping man add a touch of whimsy to an otherwise ordinary structure.





Hope y'all enjoy.


Reply author: deemery
Replied on: 09/19/2010 4:46:15 PM
Message:

Very nice, Leeflan! Shows that, with a bit of care, there's no reason why plastic can't look like weathered wood. Here's a work-in-progress, HOn30 (actually 009) cars:

No kitbashing (yet), just some careful painting and weathering.

dave


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/20/2010 06:38:46 AM
Message:

Here's a gondola that I kitbashed into a wood chip hauling gondola many years ago. I added the sides and other thingies to it:



The model looked so good all nicely painted that I was hesitant to weather it as per the prototype, so I compromised - I weathered only one side. Looks new heading one way, well used the other!







Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/20/2010 11:10:37 AM
Message:



This is an old Gloor Craft wood kit that I reduced in size to about 2/3rds the original and modeled it with a slate roof.


Reply author: Ray46
Replied on: 09/20/2010 2:48:23 PM
Message:

A simple kitbash from an HO Atlas Station Platform. I added a base to raise the platform to boxcar door height and added brick paper and a little weathering.



Ray


Reply author: Chester
Replied on: 09/20/2010 6:45:43 PM
Message:

Here's a few more vehicle kit bashing. This old Ford F series wrecker is based on the Classic Metal Works cab with the wrecker unit and bed from Trident. The wheels are from a Jordan Miniatures kit.



And this International L model cab over is a solid resin casting from Sheepscot Scale. The wrecker bed is from Athearn with the Holmes tow unit and was cut down to a single screw. The wheels are from Don Mills Models.




Reply author: bdamon
Replied on: 09/21/2010 7:42:53 PM
Message:

Here is what was a Walthers Meat Packing plant



Ben


Reply author: Orionvp17
Replied on: 09/21/2010 8:15:54 PM
Message:

A Walthers "Front Street Warehouse" in its "proper" configuration as a New England mill...:




Pete
in Michigan


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 09/22/2010 7:08:15 PM
Message:

Some of you may remember that I live in California but model Georgia. Since I no longer travel to Georgia on business, it's tough to do "field research." So for the last 10 years or so, I've been using old postcards scored on eBay as research tools as well as inspirations for some interesting kitbashes. Here are a few:

The Louisville & Wadley Railroad in Central Georgia had a 1/2 mile long low trestle over the Ogeechee River. The trestle is still there, but long overgrown and inaccessible. I was really, really lucky and found an early postcard of the actual trestle.



Here's my version on the previous layout which I kitbashed using two of the Heljan Trestle kit with the bents cut down to about 3 inches. On the layout, the conplete trestle was about 39" long.



Some of you will remember that Art Curren kitbashed a mill using the Heljan Tombstone Courthouse kit. Inspired, I ended up scoring two damaged courthouse kits at a swap meet, with the intent of eventually kitbashing a mill ala Curren. But I also needed a typical Southern courthouse/city hall as shown by the Milledgeville, GA city hall.



Here's my version on which I used the base, roof and cupola from an IHC courthouse kit, with the walls from the aforementioned Heljan courthouse. (Yes, I realize the columns are way too thin. If I use it on the next layout, I'll replace them with thicker columns.)



I needed a cotton mill for the previous, previous layout on which I had intended to use the Heljan kits. But in looking at the postcards below, I decided to go a different route.




Note that they both have arched windows. Fortunately Walthers came out with the Front Street Warehouse kit. I basically cut the building in half and butted the ends together. The walls of the powerhouse and fancy cupola are once again from the Heljan courthous. So here's the Walthers Front Street Warehouse in it's "really proper" configuration as a Deep South cotton mill. (Right Pete?)



Hope y'all enjoy.


Reply author: Orionvp17
Replied on: 09/22/2010 8:19:42 PM
Message:

What??? Southern textiles??? Aaaaaaack!!

Very, very nice job on the mill, Steve!

The other kitbashes are pretty cool as well, but I really like your mill. It would look right at home in Manchester, NH. Or Lowell, Lawrence, Haverhill, Worcester, Providence, New Haven....

Pete
in Michigan


Reply author: deemery
Replied on: 09/22/2010 9:43:12 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Orionvp17

What??? Southern textiles??? Aaaaaaack!!

When the unions and labor in general got too uppity and expensive in New England, a lot of the textile mills moved south, setting up by similar water 'fall line' locations in the Piedmont. Remember Cannon towels? I heard someone on the radio from "Cannonopolis", where those used to be made.

Nice modeling, by the way.

dave (who models New England mills!)


Reply author: Orionvp17
Replied on: 09/23/2010 10:09:54 AM
Message:

I know about the cost issues, but I couldn't let Steve off without a zinger! His mill is gorgeous.

Thanks for the kind words.

Pete
in Michigan


Reply author: Rick
Replied on: 09/23/2010 10:16:58 AM
Message:

I haven't done any kit bashing yet so I haven't posted to this months theme yet.
Then I thought about the 41' Plymouth diecast that I modified with a Tom Yorke kit.
I turned this:



Into this:





Hope this qualifies.


Reply author: GreggW
Replied on: 09/23/2010 12:44:33 PM
Message:

A couple pics of a South River Modelworks L&G kitbash.

Gregg






Reply author: Geezer
Replied on: 09/23/2010 1:45:36 PM
Message:

Pretty impressive modeling here....
All well done!
I 'specially like the Plymouth flatbed conversion...
Nice weathering too.....


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 09/23/2010 5:41:58 PM
Message:

Hey, Pete, thanks for your kind words about the cotton mill. And, yeah, they did have a certain sameness about them. So how's 'bout a cotton mill that doesn't look the same?

For many years, the largest shipper on the Louisville & Wadley RR was the Louisville Fertilizer & Gin Co. (Not THAT kind of gin!) It shipped baled cotton, cotton oil, cotton seed, and fertilizer. Fortunately, I had the opportunity to take some pictures of it back in the 80's, as it's now gone.


You can see that it was a really humongous complex with different structures and lots of neat angles and roof lines. Of course, in my spatially challenged trainroom (10'x10'), I had to use a lot of selective compression. Here's my "scratchbashed" version, a combination of scratchbuilt and kitbashed.


From left to right we have a scratchbuilt cotton gin, a kitbashed oil mill using walls from the aforementioned Heljan courthouse kits and roof cyclones from old Campbell and Suydam kits, modified oil tanks from the aforementioned Walthers Interstate Oil kit, a scratch built seed house using a ton of Campbell corrugated siding, and a modified Campbell oil warehouse. Whew!

But there's one more kitbash to add to the scene. One of my favorite pics of the old L&W shows a one car mixed train chuffing past the mill complex. Notice the unique round roof, center door combine.


Here's my version of the scene. The combine is kitbashed from an old Athearn round roof coach and a baggage car a la George Drury. (Remember him? The Art Curren of passenger cars.)


Hope y'all enjoy.

Steve Flanigan


Reply author: Orionvp17
Replied on: 09/23/2010 7:54:32 PM
Message:

Wow!

I can hear the crickets and the "skeeters" from here!

Nicely done, Steve!

Pete
in Michigan


Reply author: railman28
Replied on: 09/23/2010 8:00:31 PM
Message:

Steve,
I enjoyed it. Excellently done. A fine example selective compression.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 09/24/2010 07:14:01 AM
Message:

Seeing Pete's and Steve's posts showing what they did with the Front Street Warehouse reminded me of one of my first kit modifications.

I built my "Silk City Mills" building using the front and left walls from the Front Street kit, but used plain styrene for the rear and right walls since they wouldn't be seen. I then took the remaining walls and made them into "Craig Brothers Tool & Die" - a background building on my layout.




Reply author: railman28
Replied on: 09/24/2010 1:40:22 PM
Message:

This is one of my cabooses. It's kitbash of several MDC kits. I used an overton baggage car for the round top door another passenger car for the arch windows and caboose parts for the ends and cupola. The roof was a passenger car roof with the clerestory removed.


Decals were printed on my inkjet.

I hope you enjoy

Bob


Reply author: Chester
Replied on: 09/26/2010 7:18:47 PM
Message:

This started as the Fordson tractor from Jordan turned into the power for a pump.


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 09/29/2010 3:44:45 PM
Message:

Hey Crew,

Thought I'd get in one last kitbash/mod before the end of the month, one of my very favorites.

I have always been enthralled by the Dorothea Lange photo of the crossroads store in Gordonton, NC, the same on Randy at Downtown Deco used for his recent kit.


But, my layout having been "spatially challenged," I needed a structure with a much smaller footprint but I figured I could at least capture the flavor of the original. So, I decided to use an AMB Laserkit Dill's Market as the basis for the project.



As you see, Dill's is a very simple, very plain structure, just what I needed. I added the porch and stairs across the front of the building. Also switched the side door to the other wall and added a small dock for receiving LCL shipments. Then I added signs, lots of signs, as well as the storekeep, loungers and loafers to capture the flavor of the photo. Here are a couple of pics of the result.



Hope y'all enjoy.

Steve Flanigan


Reply author: Frederic Testard
Replied on: 09/29/2010 4:32:16 PM
Message:

That's one of my favorite among your many beautiful models, Steve. And indeed the source of inspiration is great.


Reply author: Orionvp17
Replied on: 09/29/2010 5:08:52 PM
Message:

Steve, I agree with Frederic. I've always liked your take on this one.

Ah needs a RC Cola an' a Moon Pie, please....

Pete
in Michigan


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 09/29/2010 10:25:47 PM
Message:

Thanks Frederic & Pete,

Yeah, it's one of my favorites as well. In fact, while I'll be retiring a number of structures when I get around to the new layout, Dill's will most assuredly NOT be one of them. It's just too, er, well cute.

Thanks again for your kind words.

Steve


Reply author: railphotog
Replied on: 09/30/2010 08:24:23 AM
Message:

Here's my last kitbash of the month, a CN "SWeep" - a SW1200RS and a Geep 9. I saw a small black and white photo of the prototype in "Extra 2200 South" magazine, and knew I had to make one!

This was before readily available info on the Internet, so that one small photo was all that I had to go on. I used an Athearn SW-7 chassis and cab, and grafted on a hood from an Athearn GP-9. It wasn't until some time after the model was completed that I discovered the exhaust stack setup where the dynamic brake fan was, so I re-did the area to be more prototypical. I also discovered the rear of the cab was different than the Athearn model, but I left it as it was.



Such conversions were relatively cheap back in the days of cheap Athearn models. I doubt if I'd want to do it again using more recent and more expensive donor bodies.





Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 10/01/2010 08:23:41 AM
Message:

Well, October has arrived. Time to lock this Gallery and open the new one.

Thanks to all who have participated this month!


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