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masonamerican
Fireman

Sweden
1759 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2020 :  03:21:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very useful information and great photos. Thanks for sharing! Loved the Middleville cheese factory. Just begs to be modeled.

Håkan
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2020 :  09:35:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Isn’t this stuff neat? You’re right Håkan... that cheese factory would be a fantastic model.
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2020 :  11:20:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I took some time yesterday to make a quick sketch of this milk collection house of the McDermott Company in Canton, NY c.1905. This was a simple structure where the farmers' milk was weighed, added to a bulk tank, farmers' cans cleaned and returned, and the bulk milk put into company-owned cans for transport. I don't believe this milk house was rail-served, but the Rome, Watertown & Ogdansburg RR was in Canton. Took a little figuring (and you can see my scribbles on my sketch...) because the gable end of the building has 6" novelty siding while the eve (long) side has 5". A 14'x24' building that will generate one pickup and one return every day. I'm gonna build it. If it ends up being too small for this little layout, I'll build a slightly larger 'cheese factory'.

Wonder if those ventilators are available as castings...




Rough sketch...


14'x24'. 11'6" to the eves, 14'6" to the roof ridge. Big window is approx. 24"x84", milk doors 36"x84". Floor at milk doors is approx. 3'9" above grade. Little girl (isn't she charming?) is 4'4.5" tall. Floor on opposite eve wall would have been just above ground level. Opposite eve wall would also have had two large doors and possibly a man-door. Interior would have had one or more bulk milk tanks and multiple balance scales for weighing milk. Also an area for sampling milkfat content and storage of empty company-owned milk cans.

Operations for a milk collection house would go something like this... (not on railroad):

Farmers deliver full 5 gal. milk cans in the morning to one of the doors on the visible eve end. Inside, a sample is taken to determine milkfat content. The full can is weighed on the Toledo balance scale and the milk is then added to the bulk tank. The empty can is then weighed and cleaned. The weight and milkfat content is noted in the farmer's account. Clean, empty cans are picked up on the opposite side of the building.

Raw milk is then loaded into company-owned cans from the bulk milk tank and stored on the lower level until ready to ship to the large creamery where it will be processed into any number of milk products. Loading of the cans for transport would occur on the dock on the opposite eve wall. The clean, empty company cans would return to the dock as well.

Modified for a milk house on the line, farmers would deliver full cans to the far door on the visible eve wall and pick up their clean empties where the little girl is standing. The dock and doors on the opposite wall would support rail operations - loading of full cans into a milk car, reefer or combine, depending on the distance and quantity shipped and receiving empty returns. Milk tank cars didn't come into popular use until the 1920's.

These basic operations work for just about all the types of 'creamery'. The farmer's part is the same. Only what happens after the milk is weighed and sampled differs.

Fun, fun, fun.

R

Edited by - RyanAK on 02/26/2020 11:23:23 AM
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
6094 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2020 :  1:03:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ryan,

Neat prototype. I like details like the short ladder.

Did you have a source that provided dimensions?

Mike
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2020 :  1:32:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi, Mike. No source. I attempted to scale off of a high-resolution image I have of the photo of the entire building, making some reasonable assumptions like siding width. You can see in my sketch my initial measurements were in 'planks'... and then used the 'plank' measurement multiplied by likely siding sizes. 6" seems to be the right fit on the gable end and 5" on the long wall. You can see that the siding is different widths. 23 vs. 28 siding planks high to the eves at the corner. Then I sorta made a 'scale rule' by zooming in on the photo and taking a piece of tablet paper, marking a plank width. Now I have a known 6" (or 5" on the long wall....) and used my little scale to determine the other measurements. It seemed to work out. The little girl is 10.5 planks tall, multiplied by 5"... is 4'4"... which seems about right.

Anyway... that's how I did it. Might be off. Do you see something questionable? (I did look to see if this structure appeared on a Sanborn map of Canton, NY but haven't been able to locate it...)

R
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2020 :  09:21:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's a link to a large photo of that milk house:

https://www.northcountryatwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/112016-Canton-SLCHA-21-2000x1528.jpg
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railman28
Fireman

USA
5535 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2020 :  12:35:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What very interesting little structure. I love the drain spout. The little building would supply lots of operations.

Bob

It's only make-believe
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