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railman28
Fireman

USA
5545 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2020 :  6:15:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RyanAK

Kind words are easy to find with such excellent modeling.

So Myrtle Point is a double-ended siding around the depot, a spur to a turntable, and the main ending at the stock chute and river. All nicely hemmed in by the Coquille. Lovely. And pretty similar arrangement to what we developed for Werley as an end-of-line terminus. Iíve seen photos of the river steamer landing at Myrtle Point. Interesting modeling op there!

Whatís your lead time for an HOn3 mogul or 28-ton Climax with DCC and sound? ;)



Yes, you described it accurately. There was relatively a lot of river traffic. It keep at least 3 small stern wheelers busy. The RR exchanged all it's freight and passengers at the City of Coquille where they had a large dock. There were several communities both up and down river that could be reach by steamboats year around. As I model the 1880's my longest Freight car is 30'which gives me an advantage in fitting this station in in under 6'. Though my passenger cars are longer I still can get a 4 car passenger train in the clear at the station.

I'm looking forward to scenery building once my Moguls are finished. My printer will still have a lot to do though.

There are several brass N3 moguls available at reasonable prices these days.

Bob

It's only make-believe
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brian budeit
New Hire

USA
34 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2020 :  2:56:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Ryan,

I think Michael more than answered your TV questions, always good to find another fan of the TVRR. To add to his postings.....
The TV had three shops, being a rr in a constant state of flux. First was in East Waterford, built when it was the end of the line in 1895. There was a wooden turntable, the location of the approach track is still visable. The roads machine shop was in the basement of the adjacent grist mill. No room for an engine, just machining parts carried in the door.
Next came the Ross Farm shops, E Waterford shop was gone by 1910, and the turntable outlasted the engine house. Ross Farm was a decent sized shop for repair and storage of the engines and cars. 1922 photos show it in existence. No turning facilities.
Last was the Blairs Mills shop. Blairs Mills originally had a single stall engine house and a turntable. Remains of the pit were visable in the 1980's; flooding of the creek destroyed any signs of it. In the 20's the TV built a 2 stall engine house/shop with a lean to addition for car repair. This is probably when the wye was put in, in the field across the creek. The Blairs Mill shop lasted to the end, maintaining the rr's two engines.
By the time the ICC surveyed the TV, much of the interesting stuff was gone. The large phosphate plant, later paper mill at Ross Farm was gone. The connecting Kansas Valley lumber rr and all it turned over to the TV for shipment was gone. The tannery in E Waterford was gone. Also, its obvious the ICC inspector didn't feel that a detailed report on this spindly narrow gauge was neccesary to win the great war. Rolling stock listings leave stuff out, and so do the track charts. The inspection was probably done in a one day meeting with the master mechanic, and the rr probably had track maps that were copied. Its better than nothing, but if you start to check, its not the best report.
brian b

Edited by - brian budeit on 02/04/2020 3:00:52 PM
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
6107 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2020 :  5:58:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thatís a lot of good historical information, Brian. The TVRR has a lot of appeal for modelers interested in NE narrow gauge.

Enjoy the book, Ryan!

Mike
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2020 :  09:49:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, did the Lehigh Valley interchange with any narrow gauge railroads other than at Lopez? (Jennings Bros. was 36" in 1890, then 44" from 1892 until 1900 when they standard gauged the railroad.)
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
6107 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2020 :  5:44:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ryan,

On page 9 of this thread I commented that "Having a turntable at the end of the mainline always looks more like a model railroading trope than something done very much in the real world. I know in writing something so outrageous I'm inviting counterexamples."

Well,that counterexamples would be forthcoming was inevitable, and I found a couple mentioned near the end of Model Railroad Planning 2020 in a small article on "Using a turntable as a turnout." It cites Currie, Minnesota on the C&NW and Postville, Iowa on the Rock Island as examples where turntables are used at end of track to turn locomotives and as switches leading to an escape track for runarounds. The track plan for a module includes the main, the runaround track, a spur to feed mill, elevator and oil dealer (newer time period than yours), and a second spur to a team track and coal dealer. A fiddle yard is off to the left.

I thought you might be interested in knowing.

Mike
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2020 :  10:53:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike! I donít normally pay attention to the modeling press because 98% of the information doesnít speak to my admittedly narrow focus of interest. I really only pick something up if someone gives me a tip on an article in a current or vintage issue. I appreciate the heads up. I still plan on using a table at the end of the line (for now), but Iím not sure I like using a turntable as a turnout, prototype examples notwithstanding.

R
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
6107 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2020 :  11:20:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RyanAK

Iím not sure I like using a turntable as a turnout, prototype examples notwithstanding.


Iím with you on that.

Mike
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2020 :  09:18:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's the Echo at Myrtle Point, OR. A narrow gauge or short line terminus with a transfer to river steamers in the Northwest would really make a fascinating layout. I've seen harbor scenes and car ferries... not sure I've seen a riverboat transfer done.



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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2020 :  09:27:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We mentioned about layouts often being too flat. Here's Dushore on the Lehigh Valley's State Line & Sullivan. The trestle is 80' tall. Most of the town is in the gulch and valley, while the railroad and industries it served are on the bluffs above town. For this small module, almost all of the operations would be 'above' town.





Bad day for the LVRR...


Dushore's depot is still standing and in fairly decent state of repair. I snooped around it a few weeks ago.


Maybe my favorite early powerhouse.


And my start on a 3D mockup of a Dushore layout. Depot, runaround and staging on the ell to the left. Sector plate on the right.






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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
6107 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2020 :  10:53:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thatís a nice collection of photos, Ryan. The Dushore depot looks perfect for your needs. Just the right size and classic proportions. Although plain in architecture it would be a standout painted in two colors.

Mike
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railman28
Fireman

USA
5545 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2020 :  12:41:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great shots, I plan to model the Echo. Don't you love all the port infrastructure at Myrtle Point? Dushore reminds me of Gold hill and the Crown point trestle.

Nice shots

Bob

It's only make-believe
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brian budeit
New Hire

USA
34 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2020 :  4:57:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here in Pittsburgh, at one time there were car ferries on the rivers. Barges with track laid on them, with stern wheeler tow boats handling them. Several of the steel mills used this system to transfer cars from one mill to another. No narrow gauge that I know of, but if they would have had a reason, they would have done it.
Anyone interested in riverboats and barges need to look into Train Troll. The company makes some very nice river boat kits, especially a stern wheeler "pool boat" in H O scale. Still trying to figure out how to add a Monongahela river scene to an EBT/TVRR layout.
My layout would need to represent a distance of about 150 miles, tough to fit in a 15 x 20 room.
brian b
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2020 :  09:18:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Echo is such a handsome craft. I love everything about that scene. Very "Northwestern Pioneer".

Now ya'll are gonna learn a little about Ryan. The 'AK' in RyanAK is for Alaska. I owned a salmon gillnetter in Bristol Bay and made my living as a commercial fisherman for 8 seasons. The chapter of my life where the F/V Solstice was the heroine has since passed, but it's hard to shake the sea from your bones.

The scene with the Echo in Myrtle Point is reminiscent of how freight moved (and still moves) throughout road-less Bristol Bay. Skiffs and landing craft are the lifelines to villages and camps throughout the enormous region from ice-out to freeze-up. The occasional flying boat adds to the summer logistics. No real port facilities to speak of... just nose the boat into the beach. Watch the tides if you're below that big bend on the Nushagak or you'll be dry for 12 hours. Winter freight is via snow machine or dogsled using the frozen rivers as highways or the occasional bush plane with skis.

No railroads there, though. :)

Fascinating history, Brian. Something else for me to look into. I've seen some fantastic layouts online that use a car ferry as on-scene staging to excellent effect... but none that I can recall set on the Mon. You should definitely do it. Just need a scene divider like a tunnel to represent 150 mainline miles. Or a wall. Into a sewing room. :)
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deemery
Fireman

USA
8255 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2020 :  10:03:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Of course, there's always the Dolly Varden RR: http://dollyvardenrr.com The book on this is definitely worth getting. For a while, it was out of print (and expensive) but it's been reprinted. http://bobhayden.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=12&products_id=27

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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RyanAK
Engine Wiper

USA
302 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2020 :  11:43:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Dave. The Dolly Varden has always been interesting to me... just haven't gotten to dig into it yet. Thanks for the reminder. I've also been meaning to take a closer look at Vancouver Island. I love that place and could easily settle my family there if we weren't so entrenched in PA.

R
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