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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
2326 Posts

Posted - 12/15/2019 :  11:27:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Still adding to the new addition with this kit:


It's a building that is sheathed in corrugated siding on the walls as well as the roof. While I've built several buildings with the corrugated roofing, this will be the first on the walls.






I've built a couple Campbell kits and have always been impressed with the instructions, this kit is no exception with one large instruction page, printed both sides and one template/drawing page.




Finally, what's in the box, a bag of siding, a bag of scale lumber, window castings and other details, and the walls and roof printed on a number of pieces of cardstock.
I should be starting this within the next couple days.

BurleyJim
Fireman

USA
4883 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2019 :  07:45:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glen, those kits are a great. I made a jig for cutting that corrugated aluminum at a scale 26" width and it made the build a lot easier. I also used a little etchant (ferric chloride) to give it that severe weathered effect, but you have to be extremely careful with that process. I've tried 'vinegar', and it wasn't effective. With the ferric chloride, I diluted it to 10% etchant 90% distilled water. It was much more controlled, but still needs to be tested and timed on a small sample piece. Have fun with that kit.

Jim

Edited by - BurleyJim on 12/16/2019 8:49:41 PM
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
5721 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2019 :  09:12:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Campbell kits are always fun. A little “old school” but that’s part of the charm. And they build up into fine-looking structures.
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desertdrover
Engineer

USA
15000 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2019 :  10:15:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah, the aroma of a just opened wood kit. Like Michael said, "old school" but to me the best kits ever. The new modern laser cuts kits are great, but there still is nothing like cutting and building a kit like these Campbell types. Looking forward as always to your build here Glen.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 5000 posts added to below count.
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rlundy
Engine Wiper

Canada
177 Posts

Posted - 12/16/2019 :  8:33:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great kits. Some of the best instructions out there. I have built the Community Church, Grain Elevator and both kits for Saez Sash and Door. These kits are very good for learning building techniques if you want to start scratch building. I have a couple dozen sitting on the shelf, that I will probably never build, since I switched scales. If you want the structure weathered, remember to stain the wood before you start building.
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3424 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2019 :  08:24:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ah yes the Campbell kit's. Also have several in the cabinet. Just bought a water tower on E-bay. This will be the second one I have. The first water tower I assembled the legs and that's as far as I got. Then when I joined this forum I learned that you add paint, weathering and stains first before assembly so I bought a second kit.

I'll be following along to see how Glenn assembles and finishes his kit.

Bernd
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
2326 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2019 :  04:07:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the votes of confidence everyone. I'm going to build this one pretty much box-stock except I'm painting it to look similar to the Bar Mills Earl's Oil that I just finished. I'll weather the roof and sides but not with etchant as I'm not after a run-down structure, just a working one.
I started by cutting the siding into 26" (5/16) widths.



It was rather tedious as there were quite a number of sheets to cut to size. The kit gives you 6,8, and 10 foot lengths to siding but they are all cut to the same width. I almost made a mistake and started cutting them all twice and wide as I was supposed to but caught myself before I went too far.


I then cut all the wall and roof panels out of the cardstock they are printed on. all the panels have the siding sizes printed on them to make that part easy.


I painted all the corrugated panels with Krylon Paver gray. The kit must be at least 5-10 years old as all the painting instruction refer to Floquil. The instructions call for the corrugated siding/roofing to be painted with Floquil lettering gray to show oxidization. I found paver gray is a pretty close match.
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desertdrover
Engineer

USA
15000 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2019 :  09:51:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice start Glen. Yes, the Campbell kits as you know was back in the day when Floquil was the choice of paints. However, using the Krylon paint will give you the chance to use your acrylic paints now. Corrugated metal techniques are described, and shown, by George Sellios on Allen Keller's 'Great Model Railroads' video/DVD of the F&SM. It's on Volume 39. Or, if you'd be interested I'll send you a PDF of his techniques. Picture of his work.



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 5000 posts added to below count.
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
5721 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2019 :  10:09:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Working with corrugated metal has it’s ups and downs.

The gray looks good. I still miss Floquil for some applications. But I also like the proliferation of craft paints now available.

Mike
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
2326 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2019 :  1:07:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys.
Louis, I'd like to see that PDF file, I have done a large corrugated roof on my stamp mill project a few years ago. On that one I used my airbrush to add the rust streaks and such but I'd like to compare notes between the two.
Now that the gray paint has dried, I'll start gluing the panels to the walls using aileen's tacky glue.
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
2326 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2019 :  01:24:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I added the siding to the walls:



I had glued then in place using Aileen's Tacky glue and it held but not overly well. I ended up running a bead of thin CA around the edges of each wall/roof to make sure the siding stayed in place. When I did the roof on my stamp mill I used a different brand of aluminum siding and the Tacky glue worked just fine in that instance. The two end walls have extra siding material on the ends because they have to wrap around the longer walls when they are assembled to hide the side joints.



I also added the reinforcement to the backside the of walls. I did't take into account that the glue would warp the walls as it dried so when I glued the basswood to the back I had to clamp each wall/roof between two black of wood to straighten them again.
I just painted the inside of the walls so tomorrow I'll start painting a bit as time permits.
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
2326 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2019 :  9:54:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I hope everyone had a good Christmas.
I continued to work on the structure over the past couple days.



I decided to stain/paint as much as I could before assembly. I made the three cargo doors buy cutting all the parts, staining them in A&I and then assembling them. While I was at it I stained the rest of the stripwood in A&I as well.




Then I fired up my airbrush. I painted the walls in Vallejo Model Air Yellow Lazure. I painted a bit on the thin side so A bit of the gray still showed through. I also painted the loading dock side pieces in yellow, over the A&I stain.
I've just started to paint using the Vallejo paints, they seem to work pretty well.




Then I switch colors to Pale green, also by Vallejo. I painted the doors and the stripwood that will be used as doorway trim, roof fascia and the door track. I also painted the two windows. I attempted to give the colors a bit of similarity to the colors that I used on Earl's Oil. I may give the walls a light spray of a darker yellow yet but I haven't decided yet.
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
2326 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2019 :  10:43:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I tried to weather the walls a bit with some black chalk. Not sure if this is the way to go but it certainly tones down the yellow.

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BurleyJim
Fireman

USA
4883 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2019 :  11:29:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glen,
Are you shooting Vallejo-Air or standard Vallejo and adding retarder, thinning by % with distilled water? Those green windows look sharp!. The project is coming right along. [:-thumbu]

Jim
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
5721 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2019 :  11:33:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The paint will really tie the buildings together. And you’d expect paint on corrugated metal and on wood to look a little different after a while.

Mike
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
2326 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2019 :  11:45:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys
Jim I'm using Vallejo-air with just a bit of testors acrylic thinner to let it flow a bit better.
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