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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2019 :  12:31:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

Nice detail construction and how-to Tony. You have the niche to continue to amaze. Keep it coming.

Rich



Thanks Rich. Much appreciated.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2019 :  12:46:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
WOW! I just looked at the number of views on my thread, 57,988. I don't think I've ever seen mine go that high. All I can say to all of you, I really do appreciate your support, and in some cases, criticism, it helps me improve.

Thank you all.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2019 :  5:40:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've had this little car kit for an unknown number of years, never built it because it wasn't exactly up to my standards, but I couldn't throw it away either.

Do you have one of those???

So it has been stashed in the back of my drawer for as many years, and while searching for something else, I came across it, for maybe the dozenth time, and thought I'd give it a closer look.

It is a two car kit, but upon opening the closed plastic bag etc., I find a couple of pieces missing, one being the chassis.

OK, I can at least work with one. I probably got it thrown in with some eBay baggage once, I don't remember. But I thought it would be fun for a change.

The styrene was black, and VERY GLOSSY. Surprisingly, though, very little if any flashing. I decided if I do this, I'll leave the top off, mainly because of the 3" thick 'wires' that holds the top up, and the 4" thick plastic glass.

I test fitted everything, not bad, but I had to file the headlamp down a tad to fit between the fenders





I am not even sure the name of the model company is "Model International" from Germany, but that is all I could find.

So, after test fitting over and over, making sure I hadn't missed anything, and drilling out the wheels to accept the small bronze rod axles (the holes were there, just not big enough, same for the grill 'plugs' being a little bigger than the holes in the mating part)
I proceeded to get my spray gun out and shot a black mixed with a little brown by Vallejo. Nice faded flat black.

The holes in the back of the seat had been filled in as I wasn't going to use the cover.

The paint dried fairly quick, and I used pastels to weather it. I glued in the axles after painting the wheels, and assembled the car.

It all went pretty well, and even look's fairly decent. I wouldn't use it for a main show, but like my wife says, it would look great abandoned in a field. I added some 'mud' to the wheels and under the fenders, but I like it.

Just goes to show that even a lemon can come out with a few stars.







The front looks more like a 1938 Bentley than a Ford model T, but still, overall, not a bad piece to add somewhere just right.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 09/14/2019 5:45:00 PM
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Pennman
Fireman

USA
4229 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2019 :  6:00:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,

It is always wonderful to see you out and about, from ups and downs, and if I were to find something missing in a kit box, I would do the same thing - make my own !! You are a genious.. [:-thumbu][:-thumbu][:-thumbu]
It's nice to see you posting again and as always, making something out of the ordinary. Thanks for sharing with us.

Rich
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2019 :  6:20:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

Tony,

It is always wonderful to see you out and about, from ups and downs, and if I were to find something missing in a kit box, I would do the same thing - make my own !! You are a genious.. [:-thumbu][:-thumbu][:-thumbu]
It's nice to see you posting again and as always, making something out of the ordinary. Thanks for sharing with us.

Rich



Thanks Rich.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
5580 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2019 :  7:16:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Spiffy little model, Tony. HO?

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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2019 :  9:50:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Spiffy little model, Tony. HO?





Thank you Michael, yes, it is.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/22/2019 :  11:05:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here is a quick project for those that need just a little more room at the workbench.

01. For years I had worked off a shelf or fitted board, over the pull out drawer.
This left me without any easy access to the drawer itself, and so the desk to got too crowded.
I decided to remedy the situation.


02. The 'board' is now gone, and I have it used now for the storage of what I am working on
easily accessible without having to rummage through the stuff on top, often out of reach. Problem solved.


03. So now I can work on the top of the desk, which is also higher, so I am not bending
over so much, or the drawer moving on me, which it did ever so slightly sometimes, often
in the downward direction. Happy camper.


04. So now I wanted to square up some stripwood. Let alone cut it soon after, so I placed
it on my knees. Not very sturdy, or convenient. HmmmmÖ.


05. OK, I'll just open the top side drawer and work off that, ARHG!!!, same problem, even
less sturdy. This isn't going to work. I thought of putting the other 'desk top' on this
drawer, but it was too big, heavy and unwieldly, so that wasn't going to work either.


06 So, I had an idea of making it's own specific top. Out comes a small notepad to sketch
up a idea and dimensions. 13-1/4" wide, take in the height, etc., etc., OK, got it. Down to the 'wood shop'


07. Got it finished in about an hour. I used one section of cut-off board left over from
the shelving I added some weeks ago between my bookcases. The width was already perfectly
sized, 12", so no need to cut anything except to length, plus a little for a finger grip
and side sections. The inner 3/4" (roughly) is for the additional height I needed.


08. Sanded every edge smooth or rounded over on the belt sander for comfortable handling.
Also rounded off the front and rear supports for easy adding to drawer top.


09. A perfect fit. The top is sanded smooth, the sides are a solid, but easily removable, fit. I love it.


10. Now I have a nice surface to work on, that is easily removable to access the tooling
(mostly drill bits, tweezers, etc.) below. Happy camper, yet again.



Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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kebmo
Fireman

USA
1732 Posts

Posted - 09/22/2019 :  2:50:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
that's a great idea. i need to do the ame thing for the same reason.
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/22/2019 :  8:15:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
H
quote:
Originally posted by kebmo

that's a great idea. i need to do the ame thing for the same reason.



Glad you found it helpful Kevin. And as to the kamikaze, who knows [:-crazy]

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2019 :  10:50:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Finally back into doing some detail work on the interior. The center partition between the loco tracks, which is removable at the moment, is having some detail added. It isn't complete yet, I have a few other ideas floating around. But here is a few days worth of effort, 1 or 2 hors a day. A lot of the tools are from Vector Cut, and a few others are from Shapeways. The blocks on top are wooden chocks for the 'mini' freight cars.






Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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Michael Hohn
Fireman

USA
5580 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2019 :  3:21:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

Wonderful work. Iím glad to see doing all those tools didnít throw a wrench in the works.

Mike
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slimrails
Moderator

USA
8406 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2019 :  4:42:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit slimrails's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Amazing detail work, Tony. [:-thumbu]
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/27/2019 :  10:15:03 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Mike, there is one wrench missing (on purpose), so maybe it did??? I'll find it an put it on the bench, along with some others, I am sure.

Thank you Russ.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
3151 Posts

Posted - 09/29/2019 :  9:37:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
While in the process of adding details, like ladders in this case, one that I had was a 2 part step ladder that I think came from a Central Valley set, but not certain. Regardless, a ladder of this sort would have some cross bars to prevent it from running straight out. So that is what I proceeded to do.

Rather than just glue some styrene to the sides, I wanted to anchor them, and to make it more realistic look like it would fold in the middle.

So I drilled some .014" holes in some 1x3 styrene, 1/4" apart, and also in the ladder sides. Now, previously, I had taken a sharp knife and file to, one, take some material off the ladder to lighten it, and two, give it some semblance of wear.

So when I came to the process of drilling holes in the ladder sides, I broke the back supporting section. Out came some slight expletive, and in a couple of minutes, decided to make my own.

Once done, the rest was easy. But I think the slimmer supporting section looks better.













Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 09/29/2019 9:41:18 PM
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