Railroad Line Forums
Railroad Line Forums
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Mike Chambers' Craftsman's Corner
 Palmerston Ontario Coal Dock
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Previous Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 18

hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7212 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2019 :  1:18:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For anyone building a coaling tower, that pipe and valve would sure make an interesting detail.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.
Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Canada
8438 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2019 :  1:25:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They would just shut the water off in the winter.
So loading coal was bit dusty/dirtier in the wintertime than in the warmer months.

Greg
Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper

Canada
279 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2019 :  7:09:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hon3_rr

For anyone building a coaling tower, that pipe and valve would sure make an interesting detail.



I wonder if 'anyone' is listening . . . Subtle but sneaky Kris

I was just thinking about how I might do just that; checked my inventory of polystyrene and brass wire. Looks like I have what I need!

Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com
Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper

Canada
279 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2019 :  7:35:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

I'd question the water treatment also. I wonder if they used an oil spray or maybe kerosene? This is what was done at the breakers when loading coal hoppers. The coal would get sprayed with an oil as it went down the chute into the hopper.

Bernd



You could be correct, but as I watch the video, the oil or kerosene, if that's what it is, is not spraying out but gushing out. I would imagine that using kerosene or oil in such volume, would be rather costly compared with water not to mention the accumulation of oily residue running down the tender and accumulating at the foot of the coaling station.

It would be an unholy mess! [:-headache]

Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com
Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper

Canada
279 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2019 :  9:38:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
After our little discussion here, I did some digging on the internet and found something about coal and the dust it produces as follows . . .

The US Department of Transportation classifies coal dust as a “pernicious ballast foulant” that can weaken and destabilize rail tracks.

Coal dust deposits sometimes cause spontaneous fires, and in 2005, for example, coal dust that had accumulated in ballast, the layer of crushed rock that supports rail tracks, caused derailments.

If shippers wished to reduce or prevent coal dust from escaping, they could do so by filling cars less full or covering them with tarps or chemical sprays. However, these measures run up the cost of moving coal, so coal shippers prefer not to employ them.

Spontaneous combustion of coal is a well-known phenomenon, especially with PRB coal. This high-moisture, highly volatile sub-bituminous coal will not only smolder and catch fire while in storage piles at power plants and coal terminals, but has been known to be delivered to a power plant with the rail car or barge partially on fire.

Outside of confined environments, PRB coal does not spontaneously explode or burst into full flame, but under the wrong conditions it can self-ignite and burn slowly even while it is riding the rails.


Wow, never knew coal dust was such a problem!


Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com
Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman

USA
3373 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2019 :  08:33:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Artman

quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

I'd question the water treatment also. I wonder if they used an oil spray or maybe kerosene? This is what was done at the breakers when loading coal hoppers. The coal would get sprayed with an oil as it went down the chute into the hopper.

Bernd



You could be correct, but as I watch the video, the oil or kerosene, if that's what it is, is not spraying out but gushing out. I would imagine that using kerosene or oil in such volume, would be rather costly compared with water not to mention the accumulation of oily residue running down the tender and accumulating at the foot of the coaling station.

It would be an unholy mess! [:-headache]



Makes sense. I thought maybe they had some kind of nozzle on the end that would give a spray pattern. As you said though, "it comes out in a flow", so it must be water.

Bernd
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 18 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.27 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000