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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2014 :  11:58:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Just coming from the main lounge with a cup of coffee in my hand. Time to continue with this thread.

Once the Thread locker had set up it was time to attach the wheels to the axle in their proper place. Here you can see a wheel plus the tubing spacer.



Next a small drop of the Thread Locker is placed at the joint and allowed to set up.



Next the axles are mounted in the chassis and the with the NMRA gauge the wheels are gauged to the proper width. One thing I forgot to take pictures of is the addition of an insulating bushing on the second wheel set to insulate it from the other side.



In this view you can see the white plastic bushing on the wheels in the upper portion of the picture. I cut a shaft to check for clearances.



I needed to mill out approximately .070" to fit a brass plate on the bottom.



The 3/16" brass plate was fastened to the bottom of the chassis with two 4-40 screws.



Two 1/16" pins were inserted to allow for lining up of the brass plate and gearing tower. This is done to allow for maintenance and being able to replace the plate with the bearing caps (yet to be made) in the exact same position.



In order to hold the 1/16" pins in the chassis a drop of thread Locker added.



Next I milled a slot down the center of the brass plate. The first thought was to mill a pocket to place the bearings in and make two bearing caps.



I didn't think that was a good idea so I opted for a single bearing support.





In order to drill a hole accurately down through the plate. I set up the Sherline mill with a V block. Now I could drill a hole from both sides and be assured they would meet in the middle. Reason for flipping the block is that the drill wasn't long enough to go all the way through from one side.

Spot drill and drill, flip and repeat.





The bushing have been pressed in.



Next, the slot in the center was milled wider to fit the new brass block. It was milled on the bottom to fit the helical gears for minimum backlash. The top was also milled off to make the part smaller and allow room for a motor.



Unfortunately this didn't work out for me. Temporarily mounting the large reduction gearing on the shaft showed interference with the wheels. Even though it does't look like it in the picture. I could adjust the whole setup but that involved more work than I cared to do.



The next installment will show a complete redesign that worked out much better in the long run

Until then.

Bernd
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MarkF
Engineer

USA
13728 Posts

Posted - 08/02/2014 :  02:00:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Bernd, you are quite the machinist! And you make it looks so easy. While I haven't modified many mechanisms myself, for the few times that I did, I wished that I had the tools and the talent that you possess to accomplish what I needed to be done. Great job and I'm looking forward to reading more.

Mark
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/02/2014 :  1:49:31 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MarkF

Wow Bernd, you are quite the machinist! And you make it looks so easy. While I haven't modified many mechanisms myself, for the few times that I did, I wished that I had the tools and the talent that you possess to accomplish what I needed to be done. Great job and I'm looking forward to reading more.



Hi Mark,

Thank you for the nice compliment. Much appreciated.

I own a lot of thanks for that talent to my Dad. He was a tool and die maker. I guess it sort of rubbed off. In high school my best subject was machine shop. Plus I spent over 30 years in the machine tool industry, so I know my way around tools. One of the reasons I'm posting what I'm doing is that to many feel they can't do the same type of work, but they can if they have a natural ability to pick up on this type of work. I believe many modelers have the talent if shown how to do work like this. I'm hoping through my postings that somebody will say, hey I'm going to try that. I'm more than willing to help out with answers to question as to the how and why. Many will not get into it as heavy as I have because it does take a bit of money to acquire the tooling.

I have several more projects that I'm going to present in this thread.

Bernd
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quartergauger48
Fireman

USA
5934 Posts

Posted - 08/02/2014 :  2:50:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Bernd, I feel like I am back in MINI metal shop. unfortunately I was much better in wood shop.
I was though a wiz in print shop. Funny how very little they have these shops in school today...
I have a hard time attempting to do any thing even remotely close to this type of work. I can just about
change a light bulb in a locomotive. I am always afraid I will destroy the wiring or not get it back together again.
I will be watching this thread as I find it educational and interesting............
[:-thumbu][:-star][:-star][:-star][:-star][:-star]



ted :<)
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2014 :  09:56:57 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by quartergauger48

Funny how very little they have these shops in school today...


That's why I try to explain how I do stuff like this and show modelers that they can do this type of work also with a little patients and someone willing to show how it's done or at least answer questions.

quote:
I have a hard time attempting to do any thing even remotely close to this type of work.


That may be true, but I have to give someone like that credit and praise for at least trying and not copping out that they are afraid to even try. You learn through mistakes. Keep watching and I'll show you that I make mistakes also. I'm not afraid to show where I messed up. It's the way you learn.

quote:
I will be watching this thread as I find it educational and interesting............


That's what I like to do, make it educational and interesting and hope somebody will pick up an idea and apply it to there project.

Thansk for the 5 star rating. Believe me I'm not that good (yet!), there are better.

Bernd
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MarkF
Engineer

USA
13728 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2014 :  11:28:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

Hi Mark,

Thank you for the nice compliment. Much appreciated.

I own a lot of thanks for that talent to my Dad. He was a tool and die maker. I guess it sort of rubbed off. In high school my best subject was machine shop. Plus I spent over 30 years in the machine tool industry, so I know my way around tools. One of the reasons I'm posting what I'm doing is that to many feel they can't do the same type of work, but they can if they have a natural ability to pick up on this type of work. I believe many modelers have the talent if shown how to do work like this. I'm hoping through my postings that somebody will say, hey I'm going to try that. I'm more than willing to help out with answers to question as to the how and why. Many will not get into it as heavy as I have because it does take a bit of money to acquire the tooling.

I have several more projects that I'm going to present in this thread.

Bernd



I appreciate anyone who is willing to take the time to document a project they are working on and share it with us here on the forum. While I may not possess the tools or talent that you have, there are always ideas that can be picked up, not to mention the motivation to at least try something new.

I will be definitely following along.

Mark
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2014 :  3:07:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Time to continue with this thread. It's to hot outside so I'm staying in the air-conditioned camper till we go home later.

Since what I had planned for a drive system for the Hustler didn't work out I had to come up with another way to do this. I decided I needed to make a floor to mount the motor and gear tower on to. I eliminated the original plastic floor with the pilot beams attached in favor of a brass floor. I'd have to remove the center portion where I had attached a brass floor the for the first design.

I used red layout dye on a piece of 1/16" thick brass. This is to be the new floor. More on this later.



The gearing that is going to be used is from a cannibalized HobbyTown tower drive. I'm using a motor purchased from NWSL. I was in luck. The shaft fit the bushing on the HobbyTown gear tower. That's the original gear with ball end in front of the gear tower. The other set of gears is to the right.



Not wanting to make new bushings I made a mandrel to push out the bearing.



By gently holding the tower in a vise I tapped on the mandrel and got the bushing out.



I turned a second step on the mandrel and removed the second bushing.



With the bushings removed I can now make my own gear tower.



ext I tried to remove the ball socket on the end of the small gear shaft. I succeeded in breaking the small diameter shaft off. I now had to drill out the stuck shaft on this tiny gear. I used the lathe and a collet to hold the gear for drilling. Since the gear was of smaller diameter than the collet is. to remedy that problem I wrapped a piece of .005" brass shim stock to hold it in exact center to drill out the shaft. This is the end result.



Next I made a new gear tower. I'll show how to keep the bushing in the center by making two pieces that can be taken apart should you ever need to remove and replace the bushing.



In preparation of solderin the two pieces together I made an aluminum jig with a step milled into it. This will keep the two parts aligned before the solder hardens.



Here the two parts have been soldered together.



Here I've cleaned up the solder joint, plus milled to clean up the part. You can barley see the solder joint on the left side. Here I'm using a wiggler to line up the edge with the center of the spindle. Once centered on the edge I'll move the amount necessary to get on the exact center of the joint. I'll do the same from the side to get to the exact center of the part.



Next center drill.



I used four different size drills to sneak up on the correct outside diameter of the bushing. A drill will never drill the exact size hole that it's supposed to and since I didn't have a reamer for the correct size of the bushing this method work good.



Worked great. A nice snug fit of the bushing.



Next I moved the proper amount to drill the second hole for the next set of gears. At this writing I can;t remember how I determined the distance. Same procedure as the previous hole.



Here's the end result. Gears in perfect alignment and no bind or wobble.



That's it for now. Going to have a late lunch and head home. I'll post more once I get home.

Bernd
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BigLars
Engineer

USA
11466 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2014 :  3:13:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very interesting builds. Thank you for sharing.

My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2014 :  8:40:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Larry.

I did this project about 3 years a go. Since then I've improved on some of the design ideas and will present them here. They've were all done a while ago. I just had to find a forum where the members would appreciate such work.

Ok, onwards.

Next I milled steps in both sides of the top part and filed it to a sort of half round profile. The steps were left .062" thick for a .125" long 0-80 screw. I also drilled and reamed holes through both portions for line up pins. Here I'm tapping the four 0-80 holes. I made a tapping stand which helps in not breaking these small taps.



Next I heated up the gear tower so I could separate the two pieces. I cleaned up the surfaces with a file. Now you can get a better idea of the two half's that hold the bushing in place. Why I did this will be more apparent later.



Assembled with the first two reduction gears.



Here is why the top part of the gear tower was made the way it was. The motor shaft will have the small gear Loctited on the shaft. If I ever have to replace the motor all I need to do is unscrew the four screws on top and I can take the motor out without having to completely disassemble the whole drive train.



Next post I'll add the third gear shaft that will hold the final large gear and the two helical gears for the axles.

Bernd
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bitlerisvj
Fireman

USA
1437 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2014 :  1:26:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bernd,
This is absolutely amazing. I am eating this right up. I am not sure I can duplicate your wonderful work, but I am pretty sure I will come up with something passable with the ideas you are providing in this wonderful series.
Thanks very much and regards, Vic B.
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2014 :  1:55:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bitlerisvj

Hi Bernd,
This is absolutely amazing. I am eating this right up. I am not sure I can duplicate your wonderful work, but I am pretty sure I will come up with something passable with the ideas you are providing in this wonderful series.
Thanks very much and regards, Vic B.



Hi Vic. Thanks for the compliment. Glad to hear you are getting something out of this. It makes it all worth while. I bet you can do the same amazing work. It just takes time to learn and I've had a lot of time. You are very welcome.

Bernd
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2014 :  2:38:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Lets continue with this thread.

Here I'm lining up the part again so I can find the center of the tower.



I then used the third reduction gear to line up the hole that needed to be drilled. I mounted the gear on a .092" rod. It was a loose fit on the rod. I then moved the mill table until I had a minimum backlash in the gear.



Proper backlash has been established. I then raised the spindle, removed the gear and rod and drilled the hole for the bushing.



Another perfect fit. Just snug enough not to fall out.



The gear train is now complete.



Next I made up a motor mount. I used a piece of .030" thick brass with holes drilled to the dimensions given on the sheet that came with the motor. A thicker piece, 3/16" thick, was soldered on the bottom to provide clearance for the screws on the motor and bushing.



A side view of the motor plate.



The motor bracket mounted on the motor, plus the other gearing.



Checking for binding.



In order to mount the bottom gear on the tower I need to cut a slot in the bottom of the motor bracket so the shaft passes through.



I drilled a couple of clearance holes for 2-56 screws in the bottom of the motor plate. Two holes were drilled into the tower, but not all the way through, about 1/4" deep so the screws would bottom out to hold them from loosening up. They were left long while running the motor. This gave me the idea of a floating motor plate. The shaft of the motor will support itself in the bushing. Arrow points to the clearance slot for the drive shaft.





Here I'm measuring how much I need to shorten the screws so they bottom out without clamping the motor plate.



When I purchase screw for model railroading I get the longest ones I can get a hold of. Reason, it's easier to cut them to length than it is to try to find the right length. I screw them into the proper thread die.



I then use a pair of side cutter. The screw is soft enough to do this.



Then I file off the burrs. Then back the screw out, this helps clean the threads.



The gear tower completely assembled. Nothing has been permanently fasten yet.



And what it will looks like mounted in the frame/chassis.



Notice that in the last two pictures that the smallest gear (drive pinion) is secured to the motor shaft. This was the reason for making the top part of the tower removable.

Next I make a new floor plate to mount the tower on and add some wheel wipers.

Bernd

Edited by - Bernd on 08/04/2014 2:44:48 PM
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MarkF
Engineer

USA
13728 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2014 :  6:47:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One word... fascinating! And I'll bet it runs as good as it looks.

Mark
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Bernd
Fireman

USA
3427 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2014 :  7:49:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MarkF

One word... fascinating! And I'll bet it runs as good as it looks.



Mark, thanks.

I did a video of it and posted it on page one. Scroll down until you get past the picture of the FT units. You can see it run. It's a little noisy. As I'm posting this I'm thinking I might try a different drive on the next project. I'll have a neat one coming up after this one is "semi-finished"

One thing I'd like to mention here also is that anybody can do this kind of work. You don't need the fancy mill. A lathe though would be handy. All the drilling can be done in a drill press. All that is need is careful layout work. The machine tooling makes it look easier, and it is.
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quartergauger48
Fireman

USA
5934 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2014 :  8:29:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Bernd, That is an incredible amount of detailed intricate work. You are very talented to say the least.



ted :<)
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