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 Painting chain
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R.BOUDREAUX
Fireman

USA
1452 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  1:03:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey, guys,

Tell me what your technique is for painting chain. I'm talking about small chain. I am rigging a hoist and I am having a heck.....no hell of a time getting it painted.

Let me hear some of your secrets.

Thanks,

Rich

Ensign
Fireman

Canada
5174 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  1:08:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Rich,what is your chain made of?
If it's brass chain, you can use "blacken it" it's a blue liquid that will turn your brass coloured chain into a black colour.No painting required, you just soak the chain in it.
It is also known as Gravoxide.

Greg Shinnie

Edited by - Ensign on 03/12/2012 1:12:31 PM
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railman28
Fireman

USA
2343 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  1:10:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rich,
I would First,try a chemical blacken-er and if not happy with the results would hand it from it's last link and airbrush it with several light coats.

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris
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Danny Head
Fireman

USA
1883 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  1:11:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I can't say that I have painted "chain", but this might work for you. Dip your brush in alchol and then touch the tip of the brush to dry paint pigment (or weathering powders) and then let the brush tip wick over to the chain. I usually place a small amount of the pigment in the jar lid rather than putting the wet brush into the full jar. You can control the thickness of the solution by the ration of alchol to powder.
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milocomarty
Fireman

Netherlands
5865 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  1:12:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit milocomarty's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Plain acrylics and some powders..

http://martinwelberg.wordpress.com/
http://cardiganbaycoastalrailroad.wordpress.com/
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Dutchman
Administrator

USA
25227 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  1:23:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm with the Blacken-It guys.

Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3
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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
5505 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  1:31:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I also concur with the Blacken-It group. If I need to have a 'rust' aspect to it, I will often spray paint it with a dilute rust. If you don't have a airbrush, you could use a rattle can of some rust color, and then lightly 'mist' the chain. A lot of times I find myself working with just a small bit of chain and it's just too big of a hassle to dig out the air-brush or rattle can. In those cases, again after a Blacken-It bath/rinse, I will flood the chain with a very diluted wash of acrylic rust colored paint. The chain is held/laid on a couple of layers of paper towel to help soak up the excess wash. I will then move the chain to a different location and try to 'hang' it to air dry. A word of caution however if you use this method. Be aware that if your wash is a bit too heavy in the paint content, the chain will dry to whatever position it is in and you may experience a difficult time in trying to get it to 'hang' correctly, or worse, the chain will break when you try to position it.

Another approach is to apply a light dusting of rust powder / pastel chalk and then come back and lightly flood the chain with alcohol. The disadvantage here is that you will not be able to handle the chain a lot without the loss of the chalk on the chain. I usually do the soft pastels after I have used the rust wash techinque noted above.

Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 03/12/2012 1:34:54 PM
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dougcoffey1950
Crew Chief

Canada
985 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  2:05:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit dougcoffey1950's Homepage  Send dougcoffey1950 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I use Floquil Rail Brown. I dip a brush in paint and then pull the chain through it over a piece of glass or wood. If i want it to be greasy looking after the paint dries, I dip it in I/A a few times until satisfied. (I'm using the Campbell blackened chain)

http://www.dougcoffey.com/html/model_railroad.html
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LVN
Fireman

Canada
5209 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  6:45:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit LVN's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I use blacken it. Then brown and mahogany acrylic ink. Dip Dry.... dip dry..... dip dry.

Chris Lyon
http://www.lyonvalleynorthern.blogspot.com
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Nelson458
Fireman

USA
1269 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  7:58:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I used to use blacken it, now I buy the chain pre-blackened. Saves me time as I can get what I want when I want without the use of further steps or chemicals, clean up and that wasted time I mentioned, especially since I don't get that much time to do modeling.

Tony.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene
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R.BOUDREAUX
Fireman

USA
1452 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  10:28:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey, guys,

I really appreciate all the feedback. I used the method from Doug Coffey because I do not have any acid or blacken-it and just don't have much time as I am trying to meet this Challenge deadline.

I did not use Floquil Brown. I used diluted acrylic Country Gray, then I let the chain dry. Came back with Canopy Glue watered down about 50-50 and gave the chain a wash with this. The glue wash filled in all the links, so I used one of those computer aerosol power dusters to blow out all the links. I then used a weight to pull the chain straight and let it dry. After it dryed, I touched up with some 'rust'.

It came out pretty good. Take a look.

BTW, this chain is used on the Machine Shop Build in CC. Check that out, too.





It is kind of fuzzy. I'll try again later.

Rich
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SDFarmer
Section Hand

USA
81 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2012 :  12:55:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
May I humbly offer an observation? Having worked in one of those old machine shops the "chain fall" was never rusty... grimy black, but never rusty because it was probably one of the most used tools.

I know, "rivet counter"... But, those hoists were used by men whose hands were black with oil, dirt, grime and metal chips that was soaked in more oil that was then ground into that chain.

In my humble opinion the chain would be some kind of a grimy black and the mechanism would be the paint color it came from the manufacturer, albeit chipped. In the photo the mechanism is up high enough to not get chipped or bumped so that the paint that was used to protect it on manufacturing wouldn't get chipped off. If it was on a short hoist it would be chipped because you would have to lift/move it around the shop and they were heavy and would get dropped, but if it was up on a beam that darn thing would look brand new (okay dusty). An aside, the paint that was used is a lot like what today we would call truck paint. An example is Caterpillar tractor paint...

Thanks for listening to my reminisces... I'm out'a here but in parting here are some pictures of new chain falls/hoists for reference.

http://www.aceindustries.com/c-4-hand-chain-hoists.aspx
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R.BOUDREAUX
Fireman

USA
1452 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2012 :  1:14:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SDFarmer

May I humbly offer an observation? Having worked in one of those old machine shops the "chain fall" was never rusty... grimy black, but never rusty because it was probably one of the most used tools.

I know, "rivet counter"... But, those hoists were used by men whose hands were black with oil, dirt, grime and metal chips that was soaked in more oil that was then ground into that chain.

In my humble opinion the chain would be some kind of a grimy black and the mechanism would be the paint color it came from the manufacturer, albeit chipped. In the photo the mechanism is up high enough to not get chipped or bumped so that the paint that was used to protect it on manufacturing wouldn't get chipped off. If it was on a short hoist it would be chipped because you would have to lift/move it around the shop and they were heavy and would get dropped, but if it was up on a beam that darn thing would look brand new (okay dusty). An aside, the paint that was used is a lot like what today we would call truck paint. An example is Caterpillar tractor paint...

Thanks for listening to my reminisces... I'm out'a here but in parting here are some pictures of new chain falls/hoists for reference.




Hey, Ken,

Thanks for the pics and info. You are probably right about the chain and the hoist, but I like rust.

Just something inside me that wants everything rusty. I don't know.


Rich
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Frank Palmer
Fireman

USA
1621 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2012 :  6:32:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ken and Rich, your both right. Ken is right, they ARE a greasy grimy mess and Rich your right because itís your railroad and youíll run it the way you want. Personally I love rust, but from now on Iím going to make my chain hoists grimy black. Thanks to both of you.

Frank
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deemery
Fireman

USA
4406 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2012 :  7:29:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This topic certainly brought out some interesting techniques and prototype observations. Who'd have thunk chain was so interesting?? ;-)

dave
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R.BOUDREAUX
Fireman

USA
1452 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2012 :  9:15:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

Ken and Rich, your both right. Ken is right, they ARE a greasy grimy mess and Rich your right because itís your railroad and youíll run it the way you want. Personally I love rust, but from now on Iím going to make my chain hoists grimy black. Thanks to both of you.



Frank,

I agree with Ken and you. The hoist chains are probably black or a shade of black, but black shows up in photos as black. The only thing anyone can see is a black silhouette and not much chain.

I, personally, like to see some detail, something that looks like chain. To do this, I think you need to lighten the black a tad. Gray it a little. The rust would probably not be there on a busy machine shop, but it also adds interest.

You also have to remember that you are viewing the object at maybe a 100 scale feet, plus or minus, and adjust your colors to account for distance and atmosphere which grays colors.

Of course, these notes are my opinions and I'm sure you can get a hundreds more.

To each, his own.

Rich
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