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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2012 :  6:51:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keep those 'cards and letters' coming, and don't worry about hijacking my thread. I'm learning LOTS!

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2012 :  6:54:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
By the way, Chuck Doan mentioned using Mylar for the leather belts. My brother (the architect) is sending me some Mylar scrap.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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closetguy
Fireman

USA
1855 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2012 :  6:57:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave
see if you can buy strapping from Peter at SS LTD. he has a great product and it is really strong.
Mike M
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Mario Rapinett
Fireman

Australia
5846 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2012 :  01:18:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave

I didn't realise you had completed so many machines and the base finish looks good.

Not sure if you have seens these photos, but they may give you a few ideas regarding a little weathering.

http://www.modvid.com.au/html/body_anders_machine_shop.html

ciao

Mario
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Dutchman
Administrator

USA
31577 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2012 :  09:23:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, very nice job on the construction and coloring of the tools.

I've also enjoyed following all the side links to other related threads here on the forum and elsewhere on the web found throughout your thread. What a treasure trove of info!
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George D
Moderator

USA
15354 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2012 :  12:05:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your tools look good, Dave. Did you use oils out of a tube, like many of us use for weathering washes?

George
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2012 :  12:12:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

Your tools look good, Dave. Did you use oils out of a tube, like many of us use for weathering washes?

George

I'm using a really cheap student's oils set I got at Michaels (with a 40% off coupon), augmented with a couple better quality colors. In particular, I'm off to Michaels (with another 40% off coupon in hand) to get some better quality white. The super-cheapo oils don't mix up quite as easily as the better stuff.

When my wife's off the phone, I'll do a consultation with her :-) on how to best do a transparent color wash. Based on feedback here and from Don Ball, I want to add some color to a couple of the tools, but I don't want to paint over the basic metal effects I've already gotten. A translucent (e.g. blue) coat over the bare metal should produce a great result (I hope!)

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2012 :  8:32:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm back at it... The machine tools are mostly done (need to apply Dullcote, chalks and then touch up the bright metal parts). I also need to do the engine. I did go with more colorful tools, although that's kinda hard to see in this overhead shot.

Here's the set of tools:


dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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TRAINS1941
Engineer

USA
11858 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2012 :  10:10:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave

Excellent job on the machines. Brett uses Tyvek I believe for the O-Scale machine belts. Stained with a roof brown they really do give the look of leather.

Jerry

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln
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railman28
Fireman

USA
5336 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2012 :  11:44:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The coloring of the machines came out very nice Dave. The layout look good too.

It's only make-believe
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George D
Moderator

USA
15354 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2012 :  07:43:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll bet that took a lot of time to achieve that nice coloring of the tools. Very nice, Dave.

George
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jaynjay
Fireman

USA
5704 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2012 :  10:21:18 AM  Show Profile  Visit jaynjay's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dougcoffey1950

As owner of a real world machine shop, I find it kind of strange seeing heavy machinery mounted on top of framed wood flooring. Rule number one is always have rigid flooring otherwise the machinery will warp or move and turn out inaccurate work. Today we use thick concrete. In the old days they used cut stone or made floors of square wood posts mounted upright.



In the sixties, I was a source inspector for Lockheed Aircraft in Burbank, CA. My job was to travel to the tooling companies that Lockheed would hire to do tooling work, and inspect the tooling and to sign off on key dimensions. One place I went to was in a quonset hut and had hard packed dirt as a floor. They had large boring bars resting on concrete pads. This was the one and only machine shop that I ever saw that had dirt floors.

John
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2012 :  10:42:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

I'll bet that took a lot of time to achieve that nice coloring of the tools. Very nice, Dave.

George

Elapsed time, yes :-)

In short: Pickled castings in diluted vinegar and dish washing soap, let air dry thoroughly. Primed with Model Master "jet exhaust". Let dry thoroughly. Colors applied with oil paints. Let dry thoroughly (I put the castings in the oven at 150 degrees for 30 minutes to help them dry.) Drybrush highlights and details (particularly shiny metal parts) with Vallejo acrylics (I really love the accidental weathered metal effect I got on the planer.) Let dry thoroughly. Today: Apply Dullcote and let it dry (but it doesn't have to fully cure, I can do the weathering powders about an hour or so after the Dullcote.)

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2012 :  9:01:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I started on the (SS Ltd) engine. I primed it with Model Masters Panzer Grey (which, incidentally, is almost a perfect match for Floquil Weathered Black). Then I painted the engine body (less the cylinder and valve, etc) with my favorite Model Masters "Jet Exhaust". I went back and did the cylinder and valve with Floquil Weathered Black. Now I need to let this dry/cure thoroughly. Incidentally, I used one of those reusable micro brushes to get paint inside the engine (i.e. below the rod). I didn't want to chance paint build-up trying to get spraypaint into there.

For the engine, I'm thinking about a blue-green wash over the metal color.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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railman28
Fireman

USA
5336 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2012 :  04:13:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Engine looks good Dave. I like that jet engine black. The lubricating cups and the Balls of the governor should be brass. A blue/green wash would look good. The Flywheel could be red but remember that the flywheel had no belt on it so it would NOT have a shinning ware surface.

It's only make-believe
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