Railroad Line Forums
Railroad Line Forums
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Mike Chambers' Craftsman's Corner
 Wichendon Machine Company
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 15

railman28
Fireman

USA
5329 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2012 :  5:49:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry Dave,
I wasn't talking RR track, but power line shafts. There was the Main shaft line usually down the center of the building (sometimes there were two, one running down each side). From this main line a belt was ran over to each machine's counter shaft that held the gearing drums for each machine.

It's only make-believe
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
7951 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2012 :  6:49:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah, the shafts run where I want them to run :-)

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman

USA
5329 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2012 :  7:24:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
oh yes. I've seen the main line set up along one wall, Especially in grain and textile mills, but also in machine shops where the machinery was set in bays off to the side of a assembly area. The thing is you want most of your machines parallel to your main drive. As making the 90 deg turn is complicated. In the Rio Grande line drive kit is as example of how you can power an Aux. main line at 90 deg to the main. you will notice that using it would requires a lot more vertical space.

In your first floor plan you had a couple of drill presses set up next to each other. That is good practice as the machinist would put different drill size in the drill press and then take the work from one press to the other so they wouldn't have to re-setup for each piece. My Uncle had several banks of drill presses each with about 6 presses in the bank so that he could do just that.


At least I am sharing my two cents before the glue is dry.

It's only make-believe
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
7951 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2012 :  10:32:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob (and others): For those bolt cutters, which way would the stock feed? I'm thinking the stock feeds from the pulley end, which means I should turn them 180 degrees, so the pulley end faces towards the center of the building.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

Schoolmaster
Fireman

USA
1581 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2012 :  11:37:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You might find some ideas here in American machinist, Volume 14, from 1891 which is available as a free e-book.
Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

USA
11838 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2012 :  11:42:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

Bob (and others): For those bolt cutters, which way would the stock feed? I'm thinking the stock feeds from the pulley end, which means I should turn them 180 degrees, so the pulley end faces towards the center of the building.

dave



Dave

On the bolt cutter from Sierrra West the stock is fed into the front of machine and the pully is at the back.

If you go to Bretts web site under machines there is a good picture of Chuck Doans Bolt Cutter with a pipe in it.

Jerry

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
7951 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2012 :  11:49:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I didn't realize Sierra West now owns the CHB models. Wrong scale, but -great stuff-!!

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman

USA
5329 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2012 :  5:55:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

Bob (and others): For those bolt cutters, which way would the stock feed? I'm thinking the stock feeds from the pulley end, which means I should turn them 180 degrees, so the pulley end faces towards the center of the building.

dave



Dave, Rather than trusting my memory I looked it up. The stock was feed from the Front (the non-pulley) side. The pulley end, the headstock held the die which was turned while stock was introduced from the other end.

Bob

It's only make-believe
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
7951 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2012 :  9:52:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by railman28

quote:
Originally posted by deemery

Bob (and others): For those bolt cutters, which way would the stock feed? I'm thinking the stock feeds from the pulley end, which means I should turn them 180 degrees, so the pulley end faces towards the center of the building.

dave



Dave, Rather than trusting my memory I looked it up. The stock was feed from the Front (the non-pulley) side. The pulley end, the headstock held the die which was turned while stock was introduced from the other end.

Bob

Thanks. That means I put the one crank handle in the wrong location. I'll have to look again at those models and maybe try to un-glue and move the crank handle.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
7951 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2012 :  8:58:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I started painting the machine tools. First I primed with Model Master "Jet Exhaust", a great weathered raw metal color. Then I worked on one of the lathes using oil paints: Payne's Grey, Pthalo Blue, Yellow Ochre, White, and Purple-Red (most of these from a really cheap student's oil paint set from Michaels.) I was trying to capture the tones Mario Rapinett got from his photos of the Sierra RR Machine Shop, particularly this photo:
.

On top a lathe primed with Jet Exhaust. Below a lathe weathered with the oil paints (and still wet):

and my palette, showing paints, brushes, etc (note the white tipped 'rubber brush' which is great for removing paint or spreading it very thin over a surface.):

Once the oils are thoroughly dry, I'll go back over polished metal/bearing surfaces with silver paint, and then finish with weathering chalks.

By the way, I mounted most of the tools on little wooden stands to make it easier to paint them, using double-stick Scotch tape. The top lathe came unstuck from its wood stand. :-)

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 03/01/2012 9:03:02 PM
Go to Top of Page

Schoolmaster
Fireman

USA
1581 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2012 :  10:01:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for showing that, and making progress.
Go to Top of Page

dougcoffey1950
Fireman

Canada
1009 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2012 :  1:46:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit dougcoffey1950's Homepage  Send dougcoffey1950 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
As owner of a real world machine shop, I find it kind of strange seeing heavy machinery mounted on top of framed wood flooring. Rule number one is always have rigid flooring otherwise the machinery will warp or move and turn out inaccurate work. Today we use thick concrete. In the old days they used cut stone or made floors of square wood posts mounted upright.

http://www.dougcoffey.com/html/model_railroad.html
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
7951 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2012 :  1:54:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dougcoffey1950

As owner of a real world machine shop, I find it kind of strange seeing heavy machinery mounted on top of framed wood flooring. Rule number one is always have rigid flooring otherwise the machinery will warp or move and turn out inaccurate work. Today we use thick concrete. In the old days they used cut stone or made floors of square wood posts mounted upright.

That's a good point, and add to it the problems with oil, etc on wood flooring. But I'm presuming LM3 is working from prototype, including having seen the interior's floors. Do you think it would make sense to mount each machine on some sort of pedestal, with the argument that the pedestal "hides" the anchoring of the machine to stuff underneath the wood flooring?

The Spencer NC roundhouse (museum) has one of those wood post floors, and I'm trying to convince a laser cut kitmaker to produce that flooring as a product. (He said he'd do it as a special cut, which I might well do. But this Wichendon project is taking all of my modeling time, so the roundhouse is still on the back burner.)

dave

p.s. I wish you lived close to me, I have a couple 1-1 scale machine shop projects that need to be done :-)

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

dougcoffey1950
Fireman

Canada
1009 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2012 :  2:42:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit dougcoffey1950's Homepage  Send dougcoffey1950 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Dave, I'm not convinced kit manufacturers follow prototype to the letter. Before I could sleep at nigh I'd have to modify the kit to be right. I've seen quite a few structural errors in kits.
What do you need done for maching Dave?

http://www.dougcoffey.com/html/model_railroad.html
Go to Top of Page

Mario Rapinett
Fireman

Australia
5846 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2012 :  7:47:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Doug. I noticed the same thing regarding concrete pads in old workshops.
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 15 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.34 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000