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TRAINS1941
Engineer

USA
11858 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2012 :  8:23:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave

Nice job so far.

Jerry

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln
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wesleybeks
Fireman

South Africa
2829 Posts

Posted - 01/24/2012 :  08:02:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Its all looking great Dave.

thank you for taking the time to post all the informative pics.
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 01/24/2012 :  8:16:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anyone have an extra "Model Masterpieces" turret lathe kit they'd like to sell/trade? Anyone have the instructions from such a kit?

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2012 :  9:31:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Most of the last couple of days was spent studying machine shop layout and machine tools. But I did get some modeling in, concentrating on the boiler annex.

The floor is laser cut wood to resemble concrete, with some nice cracks. I applied sanding sealer, sanded it with 600 grit paper, re-scribed the joints and cracks. Then I applied a little bit of this interesting stucco compound I got with a Michaels 40% off coupon to try out:

I then painted this with unbleached titanium buff, straight up, and then mixed in some olive green and did another coat. Then I applied a heavy alcohol and ink wash:


I started on the boiler annex walls. Turns out I must have lost one piece of clapboard, so I dipped into my 'bench stock' and cut a replacement piece. This is for the blank back wall segment. Anyway, the interior is painted the same antique white I used on the machine shop ground floor office. I scribed in clapboard seams and lifted some of the clapboards, which you can't see now, but they'll pop later on with an A&I wash, over the white paint. Here you see interior and exterior colors:


Finally, I primed the window and door castings with an antique white (spraypaint). Somewhere I learned to use "Press and Seal", which is a pressure sensitive kitchen wrap. It works well to hold the window castings into place.

Once these are fully cured I'll be able to add the door castings and then glue the interior ground floor office partitions in place.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2012 :  9:35:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A comment to anyone starting this kit: This has A LOT of pieces. I bought a cheap drawer organizer that had 4 long (12") sections, and sorted the various laser cut sprue pieces into them. I also sorted through the window and door castings and organized them into baggies. You don't want to lose a piece, and in particular you don't want one of those laser-cut detail parts to fall out of the carrier sheet and get lost.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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gnatshop
New Hire

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2012 :  10:18:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good! A great idea to keep the parts organized!

Just don't let the big wrinkled lizard come by
and rummage in the drawers and baggies! [:-censored][:-censored]

David Workman
Austin, Arkansas

www.picasaweb.google.com/Gnatshop
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Schoolmaster
Fireman

USA
1581 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2012 :  10:41:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good. Anyone built their coal bunker, it's HUGE?
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4674 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2012 :  11:32:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job on the concrete!

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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George D
Moderator

USA
15354 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2012 :  07:28:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like your floor, Dave. Those Michael's coupons let you try new things without breaking the bank.

George
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2012 :  1:26:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I guess I should talk a bit about the 'stucco compound': This has the texture of relatively thick paint with grit in it. It will take brushstrokes, so I applied with a stipply/swirly motion and worked out most of the brush strokes. It's water soluable, so I had to put the wood piece under weights to dry. Particularly on this basswood, whenever I apply a paint or wash to one side, I'm now brushing water on the other side, and then placing it under weights. This seems to be essential to keep warping to a minimum. It would probably be better, but more expensive, to cut this from plywood. Taskboard or similar cardboard product which doesn't warp as much might be another alternative material. I do really like the laser-cut cracks in the concrete.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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Schoolmaster
Fireman

USA
1581 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2012 :  1:31:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Concrete is great.
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swissrails
Engine Wiper

USA
443 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2012 :  2:47:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit swissrails's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Love that press and seal tip. . . . What a great idea!

Peter (swissrails)

http://www.randomrailroad.blogspot.com
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railman28
Fireman

USA
5336 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2012 :  2:47:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Time to echo, the concrete looks real good.

It's only make-believe
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TRAINS1941
Engineer

USA
11858 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2012 :  5:03:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Same here Dave nice concrete. And a good tip to hold windows.

Jerry

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln
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deemery
Fireman

USA
7967 Posts

Posted - 01/30/2012 :  8:32:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
First a picture of the windows painted the off-white color (sorry this didn't come out very well, too much monochrome...) The one dark spot is where I removed the double doors and tried them in the ground floor interior partition. (Looks great, but that's an effort for another day, I want these pieces completely dried/cured before I start handling them.)


Now some work on the boiler annex. Turns out the windows aren't quite centered, and you have to be careful to get the laser-cut framing oriented correctly. Wrong (too much gap on the left-hand side and none on the right-hand side):

vs Right:
.
Then there's a problem with the bracing one one of the slant sides:

So I carefully cut and patched the bracing with 1/16 balsa (which is a bit easier to squeeze into position producing a nice tight joint, which I then hide with paint.) I also provided some filler pieces in the corners to make sure the corner gaps were filled and to provide a stronger glue joint.

Tomorrow I'll paint the framing to match the (off-white) interior walls, and then apply A&I. Boiler rooms are definitely dirty places, so I'll add some coal dust chalks, etc. I want to do as much weathering as I can on the walls while they're flat.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
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