Railroad Line Forums
Railroad Line Forums
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Mike Chambers' Craftsman's Corner
 Wichendon Machine Company
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 15

closetguy
Fireman

USA
1855 Posts

Posted - 04/02/2012 :  10:54:14 AM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave
The machines look great. Thank you for the mention.
Mike M
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
8018 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  8:17:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob and others who have visited 1-1 scale machine shops: How did they handle raw material storage? Was this done by stuff just laying on the floor, on racks, in a separate part of the shop, or stored outside or separate building? I'm trying to figure out how much raw material clutter to add.

Thanks in advance!

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
8018 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  8:38:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I painted some shelf detail parts and I've been playing with where to put them:





It helps me to have a figurine to use for clearance/tool access, etc. You can see him to the left of the planer leaning against that post. The walls are there to keep me from putting a shelf casting that accidentally blocks a window.

The castings are a variety of BESTTrains, Rusty Rails and Model Tech resin and metal castings. They're primed with the new Liquitex water-based spray paint, unbleached titanium buff (a -great- starter color for simulating wood.)

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman

USA
5379 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  8:47:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, there was a lot of verity in storage depending on the specific requirements of the end product. Bins were provided for "small" (as relative here as anywhere) parts while providing racks to store "stock" materials that where needed regularly. Large heavy materials and special needs stock where usually stored on the floor or in a corner. Whenever possible storage was provided inside. Even a small mfg. would try to establish a flow pattern, obviously from stock storage to finish products. People are lazy and will natural eliminate repeated footsteps asap. So have fun and engineer your shop.

It's only make-believe
Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

USA
11931 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2012 :  10:17:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave
Nice job on this build. I like the way your moving things around to get a nice flow in the shop.

Jerry

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
8018 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2012 :  1:54:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I added an injector to the boiler:

This was bashed from an early loco injector casting, a valve casting, and some hunks of brass. I should have soldered everything, instead it's all done with ACC. (Obviously, this needs to be painted.) This was inspired by the photos of Richard Senges' boiler in this month's NMRA magazine and his website photos.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4674 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2012 :  10:21:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neat work all around ... shaping up nicely!

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
8018 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2012 :  10:12:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Wichendon Machine Shop picked up a new tool today (from Greenway Products at the Timonium show). As I understood it, this tool has an electric motor in it, and no 'controls', so I added a belt wheel, a handwheel, and a lever to engage/disengage the cutting head (don't know if that's prototypical, but I had an extra drill press lever so I decided it looked OK :-)

And here it is painted. The body has a thin coat of my favorite Model Masters Jet Engine. The steel stock has Vallejo Bright Steel, and the handwheel and lever, as well as some parts on the tool itself, are done with Vallejo Bronze.

Now I have to figure out where this is going on the shop floor, but that's a good problem to have.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
8018 Posts

Posted - 05/15/2012 :  6:31:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been looking for machine tool operators, and found this Preiser figure set (while on vacation in Poland):

Of course I'll have to back-date their clothing, as well as fit them to the specific tools. But I think they'll work out well, and if nothing else I'll remember the hobby shop in Wroclaw where I bought them....

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman

USA
5379 Posts

Posted - 05/15/2012 :  6:59:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My kind of souvenirs. Yes, redress them, they need hats too.

It's only make-believe
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
8018 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2012 :  7:56:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I started to put figures to the machines:


The figures with overalls come from a Woodland Scenics Train Mechanics set. I still need to figure out how to do the right kind of hats, my previous experiments haven't worked out well enough.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

Mario Rapinett
Fireman

Australia
5847 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2012 :  8:08:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[:-thumbu]
Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

USA
11931 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2013 :  08:29:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave just what happened to this project anyway???

Maybe it's time you got it going again.

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln
Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

USA
8018 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2013 :  11:34:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I tend to stall on large projects, and often do so on relatively small items. For this project, the 1890s era workers need hats, particularly derby hats, and I haven't had much luck figuring out how to do this.

Everything has to be done "in order". I need to get the workers done, so I can position the machines and workers, before I can tackle the belt drives. And I need to do the belt drives on the ground story before I can tackle the next part of the project...

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)
Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman

USA
5379 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2013 :  6:38:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I'm still looking for shop workers too. But really, adding them is easy. The hard part is the belting. Plan that very carefully as you have less room than I did.

It's only make-believe
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 15 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 1.05 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000