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 Overcoming Jordan-o-phobia
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AVRR-PA
Fireman

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  5:49:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I own a foot-high stack of Jordan kits - some that I bought, some that I received as gifts. I started one years ago, ran into trouble, and have been afraid of them ever since. It's sort of a styrene version of Westerfear.

As I've mentioned, one of the rules in acupuncture (which I've never tried - but I like the rule) is "Move toward the pain." So I have decided to build a bunch of the little buggers.

Moving on so I can edit.

AVRR-PA
Fireman

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  6:13:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I did some research before beginning. I printed out everything I could find on rr-line and also exchanged e-mails with Karl Osolinski.

I decided to follow Karl's advice on painting. I hope I'm summarizing somewhat accurately - "Put the vehicle together, spray it with a cheap black primer to give it some tooth, and brush paint it with multiple coats of thinned acrylics like craft paints." Karl may want to chime in with some refinements.

I asked him how he handled the window glazing. His response was a real surprise - he doesn't glaze the windows. Period. So I looked at pictures of Jordans that he had done and - there's no glazinig. His work is so awesome that I'd never noticed.

I told myself that if I made a mess out of the first few, I could always rust them up and model a junkyard.

I began with a 1923 Model T Ford Stake Truck. The results aren't great, but not totally awful either.




Left side view


Right front


Right rear


Left front after Future and headlight touchup Still sucks.


Left front overhead after touchup

1) I got the front axle on cock-eyed so only three wheels touch the ground. (I'll deal with that when I place it in the bridge repair scene.)

2) I'm really out of practice at delicate brushwork - maybe permanently, although I am slowly improving. But I definitely can't paint tiny headlights and headlight rims. I'll keep working on hand skills, but in the short term, I'll drill them out and put in lenses or fill the hole with paint and Micro Crystal Clear.

3) I didn't glaze the side windows but did do the windshield. It looked a lot worse before I gave it an application of Future but still looks like bleep. On the other hand, it doesn't look too bad on the module, from three feet away.

I'm already working on the next one - a Mack chain drive dump truck. It will also wind up on the closed bridge, decaled for a material supply company, bringing in new lumber.

More to follow as I move toward the pain.

Don
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jschumaker
Fireman

USA
1372 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  6:20:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don,

I think you've done a fine job on the Model T. What color green did you use?

Jeff S.
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AVRR-PA
Fireman

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  6:50:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jschumaker

Don,

I think you've done a fine job on the Model T. What color green did you use?

Jeff S.



Thanks, Jeff. The green is: Delta Ceramcoat Gamal Green. The tires, radiator shell, headlights, etc., is Badger 16-05 Weathered Black. The two colors are so close to one another that you can't see what a lousy job I did painting the wheels and tires.

P.S. The brighter green on the stake bed is a gloss green from a rattle can - nothing special. After it cured, I brushed over it with the Gamal Green.

Don

Edited by - AVRR-PA on 11/26/2011 7:58:39 PM
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George D
Moderator

USA
11207 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  7:40:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don, it looks good and I'm sure will be noticed on your module. I too have a stack of Jordan kits and I need to build up the courage to start one.

George
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brownbr
Fireman

USA
1215 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  8:27:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's a sweet looking little truck. It will surely be noticed on your module.

Bryan
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
1249 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  8:38:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is a nice litle truck. I haven't built that one but I have built a number of others. One thing I've done to make sure all wheels are on the ground is to atach the wheels to the axles, then glue them onthe the frame. Sometimes that makes a differnce.
I also stay away from gloss paint, especially in rattle-cans. It has a tendency to come out too thick. You're on the right track with the acrylic craft paints though, they tend to dry nice and flat when cured.

I may not be fast, but I'm slow
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jschumaker
Fireman

USA
1372 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2011 :  9:21:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
The tires, radiator shell, headlights, etc., is Badger 16-05 Weathered Black.


Don,

I've used PolyScale Guilford Grey on tires and like the result.

Jeff S.
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AVRR-PA
Fireman

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  06:47:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the comments and suggestions!

I'm working on the chain-drive Mack this morning. It's a neat little model. It's the one I started years ago. I screwed up the lift mechanism and quit. Since then, I've done a lot of styrene modeling and have accumulated various styrene shapes, so I now find it's easy to fix the problem.

I'm also starting to glue subassemblies together for the 1923 Packard truck.

Has anyone come up with any ideas on glazing, other than Karl O's solution of omitting it entirely? Just curious.

I'll post some pictures when I've made a bit more progress.

Don
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Dutchman
Administrator

USA
25228 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  07:38:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nicely done, Don. Like many others, I also have a large stack of Jordan's on the 'shelf'.

I'm looking forward to your next builds. Any tips would be appreciated by all.

In addition to the great work by Karl O, Ken Kersten (Marken) did a series of tutorials on building Jordan vehicles that Mike C. moved into "The Classroom" sub-forum and are now archived. Here are the links to Ken's tutorials:

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=8213

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=6195

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=6185

Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman

Canada
1249 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  10:37:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Has anyone come up with any ideas on glazing, other than Karl O's solution of omitting it entirely? Just curious.




I have been using the clear plastic that comes in the kits for the glazing, just carefully cutting it down to size. I wipe my figureprints off it before I glue it into place. Rrecently I found Testors Clear pars cement and window maker to work very well for attaching windows (or even making them) it dries as clear as the window material itself.

I may not be fast, but I'm slow
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Orionvp17
Fireman

USA
3637 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  11:00:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don,

The chassis of these little beasties are quite fragile, and since they're "close" to scale thicknesses, they can warp easily if liquid styrene cement is used, even sparingly. Rigs like the 1924 American LaFrance pumper, which has a long, thin, one-piece fender arrangement are particularly susceptible to this. Don't ask.... [:-banghead]

I've gone to CA for the chassis/hood assembly and still use liquid styrene cement for the bodies, fiddly bits and so on.

Some of the model airplane guys are using "Future" (the acrylic coating with the variety of names, all of which include the word "Future") floor "wax" for attaching their canopies, windows and so on with great success. I have not tried this, though, so this is third or fourth-hand information.

Nice job on the truck!

Pete
in Michigan

Edited by - Orionvp17 on 11/27/2011 5:30:39 PM
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desertdrover
Engineer

USA
12701 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  12:13:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Don, I did a window glazing how-to here; http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=34955 see what you think and let me know your thoughts.

Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
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AVRR-PA
Fireman

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  1:08:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by desertdrover

Hi Don, I did a window glazing how-to here; http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=34955 see what you think and let me know your thoughts.



Hi, Louis -- I certainly like the results you got. I posted a reply in your thread. Thanks for the suggestion.

Don
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Catt
Crew Chief

USA
926 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  3:13:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit Catt's Homepage  Reply with Quote
When it comes to flat windows I prefer to make a pattern (usually masking tape over the window material ,then cut the window out just to the outside of the pattern.(pattern usually is actually smaller than the opening)

Once the windows fit like I want them to I use any of several different glues that dry transparent such as Elmers white glue,Aleene's Tacky glue,or one of the window makers.

You can also use Future Floor Finish to install windows.

And this gentlemen is my quarter's worth ( inflation don'tcha know) on how I do it.
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AVRR-PA
Fireman

USA
4942 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2011 :  5:25:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi, Jonathon --

Sounds like an interesting approach. Do you make your patterns before assembling the pieces? I'm guessing it would be easier to get an accurate pattern if the tape were applied from the inside.

Thanks,

Don
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