Railroad Line Forums
Railroad Line Forums
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 The On30 Line
 Torres y Prietas mining narrow gauge
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 28

andykins
Fireman

United Kingdom
4060 Posts

Posted - 05/05/2012 :  1:00:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote
very cool truck!
Go to Top of Page

workwright
Section Hand

United Kingdom
54 Posts

Posted - 05/06/2012 :  09:33:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have got a bit confused, you were clearing up your bench having finished restoring a 1948 pickup. I thought it was a 12" to the foot one, but seeing the photo above I now have it straight. It was, given the visual delight of the set it is posed on, a model. It must be! Nowhere could be so modelable-that faded weathering of the writing on the bricks, that dinky little street lamp. It is obviously a corner of your layout that you hav'nt shared with us yet!
Go to Top of Page

MinerFortyNiner
Fireman

USA
2496 Posts

Posted - 05/10/2012 :  12:09:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit MinerFortyNiner's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Malcom, Duane is full of surprises.

Here's a pleasant surprise that came in the mail today...I have already framed it and it has a new home in my office:



Que bueno, Duane - gracias, amigo!

Edited by - MinerFortyNiner on 05/10/2012 12:34:18 AM
Go to Top of Page

OregonOn30
Crew Chief

USA
596 Posts

Posted - 05/10/2012 :  01:51:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
He is a good guy!
Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 05/10/2012 :  7:35:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thannks guys-too kind
Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2012 :  10:46:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Torres & Prietas has been invaded by spiders as of late:



Unfortunately, the Torres & Prietas doesnt have a hero like William Shatner to save its hapless citizens, as he did in "Kingdom of the Spiders" (filmed in Arizona's Verde Valley). Currently looking into chemical options...

full movie:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0JVZvvpU6E

Or skip directly to William Shatner highlights:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGI86TeIEN8
Go to Top of Page

MinerFortyNiner
Fireman

USA
2496 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2012 :  11:43:19 AM  Show Profile  Visit MinerFortyNiner's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ewww!

My favorite Shatnerism is #2 in the highlights, Crawling Under the Weight of Spiders...pure comedy gold!
Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman

USA
1456 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2012 :  01:35:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yuck. I have trouble with spiders on my layout too, but then, mine's outdoors. I have to patrol it at night with a flashlight and a can of Raid, because that's when the black widows and brown widows come out of all the crevices.

Shatner may have had "Kingdom of the Spiders", but DeForest Kelly had "Night of the Lepus", a film about giant bloodthirsty bunnies:

http://youtu.be/m0DKTM41r1s


Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2012 :  10:32:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ray-Your right, "Night of the Lepus" holds its own against "Kingdom of the Spiders"! It not only has Deforest Kelly but also Rory Calhoun!

Verne-Shatner was the king of overacting, I always thought he tried to (over)act like Marlon Brando...with a strong emphasis on "tried"

Meanwhile back on the Torres & Prietas concerned citizens are gathering...stay tuned
Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2012 :  12:47:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

I spent the morning vacuuming and cleaning up the mess, liberally sprayed chemicals, hope the problem is solved. What was strange was the way the Tumacacori church was infested the worse, every morning it was covered in spider webs with the little buggers scurrying for cover as the light was turned on…Reminded of some of the stories I had read about the real Tumacacori church when I was working on my thesis in grad school:
A few years back when I was in grad school I submitted a thesis proposal on the Father Kino Missions of Arizona and Northern Mexico. One of the first people I contacted was Leonard Garcia, who at the time was in charge of preservation efforts on the Tumacacori Mission. Leonard not only allowed me full access to the circa 1800 adobe church, but also allowed me to go through the original documents, some over 200 years old, and many still bearing scorched fringes from the numerous Apache attacks. In addition to birth certificates and marriage licenses, other documents suggested that the padres struggled from the conception of the church.
The earliest documents I found indicated that the padres could not get the local Pima Indians to settle down at the Mission, largely because their elders and shamans claimed that the Tumacacori Mission, located along the banks of the Santa Cruz River, was built in a place haunted by an “espiritu maligo,” or a bad spirit. Undaunted, the padres constructed the adobe mission. Corn, beans and squash flourished in the fields along the cottonwood-lined river, and mines in the nearby hills produced a wealth of silver for both church and crown. After a few years of prosperity, the good fortune of the Tumacacori Mission changed. Plagues of grasshoppers, droughts and constant Apache raids took their toll on the Tumacacori Mission. Despite efforts of the padres and support of the Spanish military, the unfinished Tumacacori Mission (you can see in early photographs that the tower was left uncompleted largely because of Apache raids) was abandoned before Mexico gained its independence in 1821.



After the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848, Americans began to trickle into the area in search of gold and silver. With the support of the American military, miners were able to reopen some of the rich Spanish mines that had been abandoned. One mine near the Tumacacori Mission was the famous Heintzelman, or Cerro Colorado Mine, located in the dusty desert hills a few miles west of Tumacacori. Another rich silver deposit, the Mowry Mine was a few miles east of Tumacacori near the present town of Patagonia. Like Tumacacori, both of these rich silver mines were plagued with a string of murders, robberies and cave-ins. Within a few short years, nearly everyone involved with these mines was either murdered, like Samuel Heintzelman, his partner Charles Poston, or in the case of Sylvester Mowry, suffered a fate worse than death; pent the remainder of his life in an adobe prison cell in Yuma. During the remainder of the 19th Century, murders and tragedies continued, in many cases entire families or groups of miners disappeared. Others, like the massacre at the Brunckow Cabin have never been explained. So forbidding was the desert of Southeastern Arizona that prospector Ed Schieffelin was told that all he would find there was his tombstone. When he did find a rich silver deposit near the burned remains of the Brunckow cabin, he named it Tombstone. Tombstone later earned the reputation for being one of the wildest mining camps in the west.
When surveyors for the Torres & Prietas Railroad staked their narrow gauge line past the abandoned Tumacacori Mission, the few remaining old-timers warned surveyors of the espiritu maligo, but neither management nor surveyors heeded warnings from the viejos. The Torres & Prietas has since been beset with mishaps. Financial problems, robberies, equipment failures, derailments, breakdowns, and even the failure of its suspension bridge across the Gila River.


Above: the Torres & Prietas suspension bridge over the Gila River was destroyed in a freak accident

Next: The curse continues!
Go to Top of Page

MinerFortyNiner
Fireman

USA
2496 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2012 :  1:00:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit MinerFortyNiner's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ay caramba!
Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2012 :  9:46:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thinking that the spider problem was solved, the Torres & Prietas returned to business as usual. Ore was hauled from the mine to the smelter, and business picked up. That was until the Torres & Prietas crew took the mixto past the old Tumacacori church, and ginormous spiders attacked the little train. Undaunted by the flury of webs and fangs, the little Baldwin pulled through, steaming to town faster than ever had before. The crew flagged down the deputy and tried to explain the horrors they had witnessed.





Clearly unimpressed (the deputy always thought the engineers were unrealistic and goofy) by the ridiculous tale of giant spiders, the deputy promised to head out to the church and take care of the problem...
Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2012 :  10:16:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The next day, after the deputy failed to return, the train crew and concerned citizens met and hatched a plan. They were not the brightest, nor the bravest, but they were miners, and miners know how to blow things up. So without further ado, they loaded up all of the explosives they could find:

Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2012 :  10:49:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
With a boxcar of Apache brand gelatin explosives, and a tankcar full of nasty chemicals, our heroes, much like William Shatner, headed out to the old church to meet the dreaded arachnids:





With a spray of said nasty chemicals as cover, our heroes filled the old church with explosives:






Edited by - elminero67 on 08/13/2012 10:53:03 PM
Go to Top of Page

elminero67
Engine Wiper

USA
407 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2012 :  11:03:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They say the explosion took out windows three villages distant. Our exhausted hereos repaired to the Buffalo Bar, where they had a sausage fest. After all, they were miners.



And that is a true story.
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 28 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-14 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.42 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000