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 On30 Buffers???
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anubis51
Fireman

Australia
1109 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2011 :  6:07:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello all,

I am currently 'bashing an old Lima OO scale steam loco to an On30 'critter' for my pike, and I have fallen over a problem that I haven't had before.

As British and European railways use the twin buffer system in the coupling of their trains together, I have done a search, but I can find no information on the correct (or suggested) spacing and height dimensions for these buffers, which I wish to upscale to On30 - 1:48.

(You will understand that most of the motive power on my Slate Tramway consists of US outline equipment, mostly from Bachmann, which use the US style of draft gear box coupler made by Kadee & etc., so there has been no consideration of buffers until now.)

Perhaps some of our British friends can assist me with the dimensions and spacing of their narrow gauge steam loco buffers, and buffer stops. I intend to continue to use the Kadees, in order to be able to couple my British and European rolling stock to my US and local locos, and vice versa.


Many thanks to all.


John.








Time is the Gauge of Existence

andykins
Fireman

United Kingdom
4126 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  07:18:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote
with the few narrow gauge railways that used buffers on their stock, it was much like the railways themselves, all having slight differences in loading gauges etc and im sure buffers too. most other railways had coupler boxes using link and pin, this ment that almost any stock could be coupled to a loco and together.

as for stops if it had buffers they would have had some kind of buffer at the same hight as the buffers themselves. if it was link and pin (or chopper couplers) posts in the centre of the track and/or something laid across the rails as a wheel stop.

if i was you id standardise everything, like most narrow gauge railways did. id chop the buffers off and make a new pilot so it looks less like what it did before and more like an import/home modifiyed loco
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desertdrover
Engineer

USA
13265 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  09:32:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by anubis51

Hello all,

As British and European railways use the twin buffer system in the coupling of their trains together, I have done a search, but I can find no information on the correct (or suggested) spacing and height dimensions for these buffers, which I wish to upscale to On30 - 1:48.

Perhaps some of our British friends can assist me with the dimensions and spacing of their narrow gauge steam loco buffers, and buffer stops. I intend to continue to use the Kadees, in order to be able to couple my British and European rolling stock to my US and local locos, and vice versa.

Many thanks to all.


John.




Well sorry I'm not British, but maybe this will be of some help.
For an idea of measurements; In Britain, (drawing shown) buffer height is 3' 5" above rail level, buffers are 5' 9" apart, maximum height above rail level is 13' 4", footplates are 4' above rail level.
The last clip is hard to read, but also shows the measurements.






Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Edited by - desertdrover on 03/05/2011 10:24:43 AM
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anubis51
Fireman

Australia
1109 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  4:13:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks fellas,

That gives me something to go on.

Now, where did I leave my vernier calipers???







Time is the Gauge of Existence
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Neil F
Section Hand

United Kingdom
95 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2011 :  5:28:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi John
What Louis has sent you is a standard gauge loco, the only narrow gauge lines that used buffers were the Corris, Talyllyn, and the Cambletown railway in Scotland, try looking at this sites Gallerys for more pictures, as a general rule the buffers were outside the track gauge.http://www.narrow-gauge.co.uk/ you can look at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php/topic/24288-mozzers-on30-workbench/ this has some pictures from a Cambletown loco.

best of luck


Neil F in Stockport

http://sites.google.com/site/purgatorypeakmodelrailroad/home
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anubis51
Fireman

Australia
1109 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2011 :  6:11:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Neil.

Your 0-6-2T looks great, mate. [:-eyebrows]









Time is the Gauge of Existence
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Oh_Mr_Porter
Engine Wiper

United Kingdom
236 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  5:07:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John, Neil is right that the LSWR loco, although small, is a standard gauge one.

On the Talyllyn Railway, a 2' 3" gauge concern in North Wales, the locos have buffers at 3' 6" centres with the centre line 1'6" above rail level for "Talyllyn" and 1' 5" on "Dolgoch"

The original Brown Marshall coaches have buffers at 3' 1" centres with the centre line approximately 1' 6" above rail height.

On this line the freight stock buffers are actually extended side beams. There is some slight variation in dimensions but a typical slate wagon has buffers with 36" centres (3' 6" over outside edges) and centre lines of appoximately 17.5" to 18" above the rail head.

So it can be seen that even on this one line there is a fairly standard height but no standard width between buffers amongst the different types of stock, but the locos and coaches do have much larger faces to the buffers than the freight stock.

On most lines using standard guage style side buffers of this type the buffer stops would be vertcal posts (often old rail) coming up from between, or just outside of, the rails with a wooden beam across that was of a size to comfortably accomodate the full variation in heights and outer widths of all buffer faces fitted to the engines and rolling stock. Buffer heads or additional blocks, as used frequently on standard gauge buffer stops, were quite a rare thing on the narrow gauge in Britain.

Hope this helps John. I'll try and find some dimensions for other British narrow gauge lines if it would be of interest.

Ian

"The next train's gone"

Edited by - Oh_Mr_Porter on 03/07/2011 5:09:55 PM
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Oh_Mr_Porter
Engine Wiper

United Kingdom
236 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  5:38:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John, I just found my Campbeltown & Machrihanish Light Railway book. This line was also 2' 3" gauge. Locos had buffers at 3' 4" centres, with centre line 1' 10" above the rail. The loco "Chevalier" was fitted with large wooden blocks with inner edges spaced less than the track gauge (approx 1' 8") and approx 4' 6" between outer edges. They extended down to a couple of inches above the rail.

Carriages on this line didn't have buffers, relying on the centre mounted Norwegian chopper couplers to maintain spacing.

Goods rolling stock had extended side beam buffers like on the Talyllyn but also the chopper couplers as fitted to the locos and carriages. The drawing I have has no scale or marked dimensions, but as the buffer heads on the locos were quite small the centres would be of similar dimensions.


Ian

"The next train's gone"
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anubis51
Fireman

Australia
1109 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  9:27:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Ian.

That sounds like just what I needed.

(It seems that I very well may be able to use the existing buffer locations on the Lima Loco, and just fit larger diameter discs.....)





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