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elwoodblues
Fireman

Canada
5755 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2011 :  08:46:57 AM  Show Profile  Visit elwoodblues's Homepage  Send elwoodblues a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Don't know what to say Dallas, another great tutorial, can't wait to see what you will do next.

On a different matter, you asked for ideas, comments etc for the workbench scene. I may be a bit premature here, but while all the details are fantastic (and mind boggling), everything looks too neat and clean. Most garages I've been in have been dirty with messy workbenches, right now your garage looks like it was opened yesterday.

Ron Newby
General Manager
Clearwater Valley Railway Co.
http://www.cvry.ca
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Ken Hamilton
Crew Chief

933 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2011 :  10:25:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ken Hamilton's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Holy Smokes, Dallas. What a fantastic How-To.
Talk about looking outside-the-box for modeling material.
Thanks for the great ideas.

Ken Hamilton
www.wildharemodels.com
http://public.fotki.com/khamilton/models/
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Ensign
Fireman

Canada
5185 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2011 :  3:57:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well you certainly put the lid on that can build Dallas!
You never waste our time,when it comes to new ideas & techniques!
Not like the trashy garbage stuff you see like those huge scissors in that up start Ensign's builds.

Greg Shinnie

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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4250 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2011 :  4:02:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by elwoodblues

On a different matter, you asked for ideas, comments etc for the workbench scene. I may be a bit premature here, but while all the details are fantastic (and mind boggling), everything looks too neat and clean. Most garages I've been in have been dirty with messy workbenches, right now your garage looks like it was opened yesterday.




Comments and suggestions made BEFORE things get glued in place are probably the most timely of all -- thanks!

YES! Thank you ... I really DO want this sort of feedback ... AND ... I changed the part about being "premature" to bold to emphasize: it's really nice to get these thoughts BEFORE things go wrong! So, anytime you're looking at these photos and some idea or suggestion occurs to you, please pass it along! (That "you" applies to Ron and everyone else. Thanks.)

Now, in that regard, I fully agree with you ... and among the inspirations I have tucked away are some beautiful drawings by a French artist courtesy of Frederic's posting the links somewhere along the way:
http://www.graphite-garage.com/illustration/ATELIERS/ateliers.html

So, it's been a long, slow haul gradually preparing the zillions of little details that will make this place a mess -- -- and I'm tending to pack those away carefully in the little jewelry/bead cases so they don't get lost ... but I really appreciate your reminder ... which also brings me to another item that's been bugging me a little ...

You mentioned "dirty" ... and I need to go through and "dirty" up the interior of the (two existing) walls a bit before things get fixed to those. Been experimenting with water color pencils, etc. on scrap boards -- will post some pix and notes once that moves forward. Also want to use some pastels and/or pigments on the fireblocks and along the base 2x4's to shows the accumulation of dust & dirt in the corners, etc ... then, of course, all the little places where dirty, greasy hands have left their marks ...

And, I've gotta do some additional coloring, dirt, grease, tire tracks, oil drips and such on the floor ... this place will be a real pig sty, I tell ya!

Glad y'all like the trash cans. Hope to see some others give it a try. As mentioned, the first one was tricky, but the second two were a piece of cake ... and the materials are cheap!

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Edited by - dallas_m on 03/13/2011 5:19:25 PM
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4250 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2011 :  11:10:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Tonight I'm working on adding more dimension and depth to the stick-built walls using watercolor pencils -- literally "coloring in" some shadows, additional woodgrain, color variations and so forth, then blending those tones into the woodwork using a paint brush and some isopropyl alcohol ...

Did a bunch of practice stuff first (of course), then did this first round of coloring on the end wall ... stopped to shoot some photos and do some comparison and review before moving on.



After reviewing the previous round of interior shots, the coloring/tones on the wood walls seemed a bit "flat" to me ... just all sort of blended together. So, I'm trying to create a little more depth & shadow here and some additional variations in the coloring ... plus some dirt/dust accumulating on the horizontal surfaces.

Not "finished" yet ... but if you compare the end wall (left side of photo) with the back wall, I think you can see a substantial difference. The back wall (at right) hasn't received any of this treatment yet, and the wood tones all sort of blend together. Going to study this a bit more and do some more work on the end wall, then do the longer back wall ...

Will post more notes on using the watercolor pencils when I get a chance ... meanwhile, gonna go do some more coloring and see if I can stay inside the lines!

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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mscwolf
Engine Wiper

USA
288 Posts

Posted - 03/14/2011 :  08:19:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit mscwolf's Homepage  Send mscwolf a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I'm now subscribed here, Dallas. Your work and photos are nothing short of amazing. Looking forward to your slow & steady process. These awesome build-threads are so worth it, if there's ever any doubt. I for one, am a more motivated and better modeler. Thanks for taking on this educational journey!

R/,
Norm
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4250 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  06:41:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Window Screens & Wild Women!



quote:
Originally posted by Ensign

The keys are really cool idea,does Mr. Mudgeon have a wall clock yet? I can't remember seeing one. How about a wall thermometer or Chambers Gas & oil calender. The open area/space above the fan, would this space be filled in with a piece of wood or something to keep the bugs out. Greg Shinnie



Well, thanks to my demented detailing mentor, I had to add a couple things to the list! Window screens are now underway ... these are made using the screen material provided with the little Vector Cut HO screen doors (which looks even better in the larger scale) ... I had Dave cut some of those screen doors for me in 1/35, so we can have one propped open in the store front ... with some cold pop on ice in a bucket and all that good old down-home charm. (Of course, Elwood Blues will quickly point out that I actually have to build a front wall before we can do that! Well, I've got the screen doors, I just need to order and build the working hinges, make the working windows and stuff ...)

Oops, started to nostalgia there ... one side of each screen is framed with bits of .010 x .020" styrene strip (seen at left in the shot comparing two screens) ... that gives a little strength to the assembly. Opposite side is framed with strips of paper cut to the same width, so the overall thickness doesn't get to be too much. Cut the screen after assembly by pressing STRAIGHT DOWN with a sharp knife ... if you drag the knife, you'll distort the screen.



And now, the wild women! [:-eyebrows]

DioArt makes a nice range of printed items for 1/35 scale, many of which are also suited for O scale. For example, the little minis in the pin-up set (aka playing cards) measure around 3x5 to 4x6" in 1/35 scale ... or about 4x6 to 5x7" in O scale. Posters are roughly 11x14 to 13x18" in 1/35 and 13x17 to 18x20" in O scale.

Recycling some old fruit and vegetable crates to sort and store auto parts seems reasonable, so I've got some of those labels too. The crates shown are actually Black Dog Mining O scale parts (item M004) available from www.pepper7.com

The DioArt web site leaves a bit to be desired in terms of photos, etc -- but the range is nicely illustrated on the BnA Model World site in Australia here:
http://www.bnamodelworld.com/military-section/diorama/scale-135/posters-signs?zenid=d0b4e1606dde17469735b563d757a7fc

(If that link doesn't work, go to BnAModelWorld.com and look for Posters & Signs in the 1/35 scale diorama items)

I got mine from Dave Reed Models in the US. Dave is an On30 railroader and 1/35 military modeler and a dealer for several lines. He also has some neat toolboxes from Inside the Armour:
http://www.insidethearmour.com/pages/addOnArmour.html
and a selection of neat accessories from Reality in Scale:
http://www.realityinscale.com/

So, I made my shopping list by browsing the BnA site (plus some calendar pages and clock faces that are coming soon), then sent Dave an email. No website for now, but you can email Dave Reed Models here: dave37167(at)hotmail.com

I got to know Dave thru the On30 stuff, and he's been helpful as I start to research 1/35 accessories -- thanks, Dave!



Thinning paper signs, coloring edges & gluing in place: As most of us know, it's best to thin down paper signs a bit so the thickness won't look too crazy in our small scales. Easiest to do this using a small sanding stick on the back of the sheet before cutting out the individual images. If it's still too thick after cutting, one of those little sanding needles I mentioned before can be handy for thinning it further. Use the tip of some rounded tweezers to hold down the sign and the sanding needle to do its thing ...

If you just stick the signs on a structure after thinning, you'll often see harsh white edges that jump out in an unrealistic way ... even after the signs have been thinned quite a bit. I took some Vallejo Sepia Ink, thinned one drop of that with one drop of wet water, and applied it to the edges with a very fine brush. This really helps tone down the edges.

Vallejo Mat Varnish is great for gluing the little posters in place -- especially the tiny ones. Use it straight, but slightly dampen a paint brush to apply it to the back of the sign or poster. Added advantage: it dries clear and FLAT, so any excess that squeezes out will become invisible! Once the poster is laid in place, you can use the tip of a knife to lift a corner here and there if you want to suggest that the poster is curling a bit at the edges.



Test fitting the little window screen panels in place ... had to go back with a felting needle and open up a couple little squares that filled with paint! Have some printed clock faces and calendar pages on order, so I can do a couple more items on Greg's checklist ... and some 1/35 scale currency (US, WWII era!) for the cash transactions.

BTW, Les kindly sent me some image files including a little thermometer and a sign that said "No Tools Loaned" -- thought that was a great idea and made my own version of that to fit this particular space. Surfed the web and found another image ("old advertising thermometers") with colors that worked well here ... and, instead of thinning that, actually glued it to a piece of .005" styrene to add some thickness and painted the edges. Go figure. Thanks for the help, Les!

Now, I think we'll break here and come back in a few minutes with some Watercolor Pencils ...

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Edited by - dallas_m on 03/16/2011 08:48:11 AM
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4250 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  07:30:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Making it POP with Watercolor Pencils



Sorry to say that I didn't have much luck shooting step-by-step photos here ... just a little too tricky to shoot pix of brown streaks on brown wood and get them to show up properly! [:-blindfold] So, I'll just show a few photos, say a few words and put the ideas out as "food for thought" ... photo above shows the colors that I used on the interior of these walls.



Those came from an inexpensive set purchased at Michaels. Should be pretty easy to find them (or similar) on-line at DickBlick.com and various art supply shops or web stores. The basic idea is to "draw" lines of color and to "shade" some shadows and highlights, then blend the tones in with isopropyl alcohol. The shading is much like you would do using colored pencils on paper -- perhaps drawing a bold line for a shadow, then using lighter strokes to feather that out into a lighter area.

Danger, Will Robinson! Okay, don't worry too much here ... ... using watercolor pencils is fun and pretty darn safe as long as you don't poke yourself in the eye with one ... BUT pleeeeease don't "try" this on a finished or prized structure UNTIL you've PRACTICED on some scrap material. Photo above right shows one of many practice boards used to test different approaches. You can see a darker line toward the top edge, which would represent a shadowed edge. That feathers out a bit, and there are also streaks of a couple other colors to add/enhance the woodgrain.

So, I'd suggest making up a batch of siding boards using your favorite stain, then practicing on those. Maybe even build a practice wall to see how it looks in 3-D and get the hang of working into corners, etc. If you decide to use the techniques on an actual structure, do a few more practice boards to "warm up" before jumping in ... it's fun, but you will be staining the wood by applying the alcohol to the watercolors. So, short of sanding and re-staining, it would probably be pretty tricky to un-do.



This is the long back wall PRIOR to using the watercolor pencils. There's some variety in the siding boards, but most of those and the studs all sort of blend together in color ... and the framing doesn't have as much definition as it could. So, I'm going to use the watercolor pencils to add some additional colors and exaggerate some of the shadowing and highlighting effects since real light waves don't scale themselves down when they enter our modeling scenes!



Again, I didn't have much luck with shooting SBS photos ... so we'll have to make do with these few shots and some long-winded chatter! Photo above shows what happens when your inner child lets loose and starts doodling on those walls you've scratchbuilt. In this shot, I've ONLY done the studs (not the siding yet) ... using a touch of black in each of the corners where the stud (or fireblock or top/bottom plate) meets the siding ... some darker brown along that edge feathered forward ... streaks of various browns on the sides and faces of the 2x4's ... and some golden brown on the face of those to add highlight and enhance the 3-D or "lighting" effects.

Once the doodling was done, I used a fairly wide brush and a liberal amount of 91% isopropyl alcohol to blend the colors into the woodwork. Brush the alcohol on in the direction of the woodgrain. When the alcohol hits, and while it's still wet, the effect appears quite INTENSE ... but don't worry, by now you've already done some practice boards and you know that the effect becomes much more subdued once the alcohol dries (which happens fairly quickly). Also note: Even after a bunch of practice, I did my first "actual" wall with a fairly light touch ... then went back after the alcohol dried and gave it a bit more. Easy does it.

Siding: Not shown here, but after the alcohol dried ... I doodled on the back (interior side) of the siding boards as follows. Very liberal application with the gray pencil, shading much of each surface, to "push the surface back" and make it appear a little more distant without darkening it. Again, this is an exaggeration using color to enhance the 3-D effects on a miniature. Then some moderate streaking, fairly liberal, with the white pencil ... followed by very LIGHT and occasional streaking with the black pencil. Then washed in the direction of the grain with 91% isopropyl alcohol.

PS -- If you "add up" the colors used on the siding, gray+white+black = gray ... but using the three different pencils puts some more natural looking variation by creating shades of gray.



This shot nicely illustrates the graying effects on the interior surface of the siding boards, but those unpainted tools are a bit of a distraction ... so let's try another shot ...



Here we get a better sense of how the shading and coloring makes the woodwork "pop" and gives more dimension. We're still looking at quite an expanse of woodwork here, so if you stare broadly at the overall photo, the wood tones will start to blend ... but as the foreground items and more color enter the picture ... well, focus on the fan and little posters and somehow all the woodwork around it starts to take on more dimension and feels a bit more "natural" (well, at lest it does to me!)

Again, using the watercolor pencils can produce some really cool effects, but pleeease PRACTICE on scrap materials, etc, before diving in on any finished structure or one where you've already invested lots of time in the build. A five dollar set of pencils and some scrap material might just add another layer of "technique" to the old repertoire! Have fun. [:-spin]

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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visman48
Fireman

USA
5311 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  08:16:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Dallas
If you are looking for cheap screens...not necessarily the frames...Christmas ribbons that have a mesh to them...work really well. I used that screen on screen doors in my current project. AND it paints up too. I ACC'ed one end then dabbed and secured my way around the screen door. I haven't tried a torn screen with flies yet.

Les


My forum build links;
Big Horn and Moose Creek :http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22704&whichpage=1
Locomotives: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20279
Railcars: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=17827
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railman28
Fireman

USA
2353 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  09:34:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dallas,
It's really looking good and now complete with the "No Tools Loaned" sign.

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris
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Ensign
Fireman

Canada
5185 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  10:18:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good morning Dallas,well you seem to have a lot going on with your last posts.Real glad to see that you have closed that opening above the "K" fan off. That should keep the bugs out of there.
I love the pin-up girls and the thermometer these help make the place more lived/worked in.
I always felt that Mr.Mudgeon was a bit like you Dallas.So the "No Tools Loaned" does not seem like him/you.I bet if Miss. Millie came over and asked if she could barrow a tool, this new policy would go out the window.Well not quite their are screens now.
This watercolour pencil technique looks vary interesting. I have never seen this before, I might give it a try sometime.By the way you are the Mentor & I am the menti or something like that.

Thanks again for the lessons!

Greg Shinnie
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visman48
Fireman

USA
5311 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  10:46:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Greg and Dallas
I use both watercolor and lead pencils. Lead pencils for nail heads just push and twist. I use the watercolor pencils on many of my projects, it works for "drybrushing" and is more controllable than traditional drybrushing. I like the tanish pencils...BTW I will use a stump to soften the pencil work.

Les

My forum build links;
Big Horn and Moose Creek :http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22704&whichpage=1
Locomotives: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20279
Railcars: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=17827
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onl26
Fireman

USA
1283 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  12:18:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That was one of the best tutorials I've ever seen on the good ole trash can. It all looks fantastic and your ingenuity is just fun to watch as you come up with one great idea after another. Hey I just noticed the keys hanging under the window, nice...!
Kevin
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Neil M
Fireman

Australia
2264 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2011 :  3:45:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
using Matt Varnish to glue down the signs and posters is a great idea - i'm going to steal that one

The area around the work bench is fantastic

Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4250 Posts

Posted - 03/19/2011 :  02:26:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Thanks all! Playing around with the layout for some dry-lathing (aka "boards") on the back wall for hanging tools, belts, hoses, gaskets and so forth. These boards are thicker than I'd use, but they happened to be stained the right color!

Everything is kinda wiggly and crooked here, cuz it's all stuck together with poster-tack ... which really doesn't stick to wood very well. ANY and ALL thoughts and ideas welcome here. Still very much in the planning/thinking stage.

BTW, the wood boards under the workbench to the left are there to remind me to raise the height of that a bit when I build a replacement bench ... and, no, at this point I'm not planning to build the other bench on top of Coca-Cola crates!

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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